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Article

Dianne Thurab-Nkhosi, Gwendoline Williams and Maria Mason-Roberts

The purpose of this paper is to explore the extent to which student assessments used in two capstone courses in a Master’s in Human Resource Management (HRM) Program were…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the extent to which student assessments used in two capstone courses in a Master’s in Human Resource Management (HRM) Program were authentic, and encouraged confidence in competencies identified.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative approach was taken to evaluate the perception of lecturers, clients and students regarding authenticity of assessments and the competencies achieved. The authors used a five-dimensional framework for authentic assessment developed by Gulikers et al. (2004) as a basis for an online survey of the students and focus group, reflection of the client and for self-reporting their reflections.

Findings

It was found that the assessments in the two courses were aligned with the five criteria of the framework for defining authentic assessments developed by Gulikers et al. (2004), however, there were challenges noted by the students and clients. Students reported attaining some of the competencies identified in the HRM graduate competency profile but needing reinforcement for more confidence. While the students felt that they benefitted, one major challenge of the authentic assessments was the heavy workload.

Practical implications

Graduate programs in HRM may be producing students without the relevant competencies and the confidence to perform, partly because approaches to teaching and learning and in particular design of assessments may not be sufficiently practical. The findings of this study can provide support for more authentic assessments in professional business education programs.

Originality/value

Few cases studies exist on application of authentic assessments to mastery of competencies in developing countries. This contributes to the discussion on competency-based education and authentic learning, with particular reference to developing country contexts.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 37 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article

Brandy Whitlock and Julie Nanavati

The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the learning outcomes assessment process and a five‐step, systematic approach for incorporating learning outcomes…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the learning outcomes assessment process and a five‐step, systematic approach for incorporating learning outcomes assessment into information literacy instruction. The paper focuses specifically on using performative and authentic assessments to measure higher‐level skills and ensure that students are able to perform the information literacy skills that library instruction programs intend to teach.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors reviewed current assessment literature from both the information literacy and instructional design fields and pulled successful examples from their respective institutions in order to provide an overview of how best to incorporate performative and authentic assessment into the information literacy instruction process. This also includes discussions of assessment terminology, tools, and strategies.

Findings

Engaging in learning outcomes assessment can be invaluable when performed as part of the information literacy instruction process. Following a systematic approach and incorporating tools that allow for performative and authentic assessment will enable librarians to successfully ascertain if students can do what we teach them to do.

Practical implications

This paper provides instruction librarians with a structured way to integrate learning outcomes assessment into their information literacy programs, and it includes an extensive exploration of assessment strategies and tools as they relate to fostering information literacy skills.

Originality/value

There is limited literature on the use of performative and authentic assessment in information literacy instruction. The exploration of a wide selection of possible assessment tools, specifically – their benefits and drawbacks – is especially valuable.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 41 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Book part

Allison R. Johnson, Matthew Thomson and Jennifer Jeffrey

Brand narratives are created to differentiate brands, and consumers base their assessments of a brand’s authenticity on this narrative. We propose that the default…

Abstract

Purpose

Brand narratives are created to differentiate brands, and consumers base their assessments of a brand’s authenticity on this narrative. We propose that the default consumer position is to accept a brand’s narrative, and we find that consumers maintain belief in this narrative even when explicitly reminded that it is manufactured by firms with an underlying profit motive. Because belief seems to be the default position adopted by consumers, we investigate what factors act as disruptors to this default position, thereby reducing assessments of authenticity.

Methodology

This research uses a series of studies to investigate when and why consumers view some brand stories as authentic and others less so. In addition, we examine the impact of changes to authenticity assessments on managerially important brand outcomes.

Findings

Only when one or more authenticity disruptors are present do consumers begin to question the authenticity of the brand narrative. Disruption occurs when the focal brand is perceived to be nakedly copying a competitor, or when there is a gross mismatch between the brand narrative and reality. In the presence of one or both of these disruptors, consumers judge brands to be less authentic, report lower identification, lower assessments of brand quality and social responsibility, and are less likely to join the brand’s community.

Implications

Creating compelling brand stories is an important aspect of any marketing manager’s job; after all, these narratives help drive sales. Care must be taken when crafting narratives however, since consumers use these as the basis of their authenticity assessments, and brands deemed inauthentic are penalized.

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Book part

Fabiola P. Ehlers-Zavala

Purpose – To highlight and discuss a framework for promoting effective classroom assessment practice that supports the language and literacy development of English…

Abstract

Purpose – To highlight and discuss a framework for promoting effective classroom assessment practice that supports the language and literacy development of English Learners (ELs).

Design/methodology/approach – Though it includes some practical recommendations, it primarily synthesizes the work found in theoretical books on EL assessment.

Findings – Provides information on the main issues teachers need to consider for engagement in effective assessment practices at the classroom levels, with particular attention to classroom-based assessment. It highlights the need for considering a multiliteracies approach.

Research limitations/implications – It focuses on ELs in the U.S. K-12 system, therefore, it does not encompass all the possible types of ELs. It does not focus on high-stakes testing.

Practical implications – A very useful source of information for both preservice and in-service teachers of ELs.

Originality/value – This chapter offers an overview of essential elements involved in the assessment of special populations of students as is the case of ELs in U.S. public schools.

Details

Using Informative Assessments towards Effective Literacy Instruction
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-630-0

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Article

Morgan P. Miles, Huibert de Vries, Geoff Harrison, Martin Bliemel, Saskia de Klerk and Chick J. Kasouf

The purpose of this paper is to address the role of accelerators as authentic learning-based entrepreneurial training programs. Accelerators facilitate the development and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to address the role of accelerators as authentic learning-based entrepreneurial training programs. Accelerators facilitate the development and assessment of entrepreneurial competencies in nascent entrepreneurs through the process of creating a start-up venture.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey data from applicants and participants of four start-accelerators are used to explore the linkages between accelerators and the elements of authentic learning. Authentic learning processes are then mapped onto the start-up processes that occur within the accelerators.

Findings

Accelerators take in nascent entrepreneurs and work to create start-ups. This activity develops the participants’ entrepreneurial competencies and facilitates authentic self-reflection.

Research limitations/implications

This study explores how accelerators can be useful as authentic learning platforms for the development of entrepreneurial competencies. Limitations include perceptual measures and the inability to conduct paired sampling.

Practical implications

Entrepreneurship training is studied through the lens of authentic learning activities that occur within an accelerator. Participants develop and assess their mastery of and interest in entrepreneurship through tasks, exposure to experts and mentors, peer learning, and assessments such as pitching to investors at Demo Day.

Originality/value

This paper reports on the authentic learning processes and its usefulness in competency development and self-appraisal by accelerators participants. The opportunity for competency development and self-appraisal by nascent entrepreneurs before escalating their commitment to a start-up may be an accelerator’s raison d’être.

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Article

Carol Perruso Brown and Barbara Kingsley‐Wilson

This paper aims to report on how a close collaboration between librarian and instructor made it possible for an existing course assignment to organically evolve into an…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to report on how a close collaboration between librarian and instructor made it possible for an existing course assignment to organically evolve into an information literacy assessment, overcoming some of the impediments educators confront in assessing student learning. In addition, the paper seeks to discuss how assessment with realistic scenarios requiring actual research helped to highlight deficiencies in skills and critical thinking, a method known as “authentic assessment”. Results from a pilot and the formal assessment are included.

Design/methodology/approach

A six‐question pre‐ and post‐test “authentic assessment” was piloted with 60 students, then administered to 43 students. Other journalism instructors and librarians reviewed the questions for validity. A detailed scoring rubric was used, with the authors reviewing each other's work for reliability.

Findings

Of students completing both tests, 80 percent showed an average improvement of 47 percent, and average scores increased on five of the six questions. The assessment tool, which addresses most learning outcomes for the course, appears to be a useful gauge of information literacy for journalism students.

Research limitations/implications

The reliability of the instrument needs to be tested. Also, modifying questions between pre‐ and post‐test, to prevent copy‐and‐paste answers, requires care to assure similar levels of difficulty.

Originality/value

While there are many case studies of collaboration in information‐literacy instruction and of assessment performed by librarians, there are few examples of assessments jointly developed by librarians and course faculty, and fewer still “authentic assessments” using measures requiring real‐world research because of the effort involved. Additionally, the paper finds no examples of what is described as “organic assessment”, wherein an existing course assignment, if developed to demonstrate student learning, was adapted to become an assessment tool.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 38 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article

Pat Neely and Jan Tucker

Simulations are designed as activities which imitate real world scenarios and are often used to teach and enhance skill building. The purpose of this case study is to…

Abstract

Purpose

Simulations are designed as activities which imitate real world scenarios and are often used to teach and enhance skill building. The purpose of this case study is to examine the decision making process and outcomes of a faculty committee tasked with examining simulations in the marketplace to determine if the simulations could be used as assessment instruments in a new MBA program.

Design/methodology/approach

The criterion for evaluating the decision making process was developed by adapting the five dimensional framework developed by Gulikers, Bastiaens and Kirschner.

Findings

The paper will conclude with a review of outcomes from the evaluation process and suggestions on how the decision process might be streamlined for faculty and curriculum designers who are developing new business programs.

Research limitations/implications

Expectations for evaluating simulations need to be completely defined before beginning the review process, assign an individual with content knowledge to lead the review of individual simulations, vendor presentations of the simulations tended to sway the evaluator's opinion of the product in a more positive manner regardless of content.

Practical implications

Competency based education continues to be a focus in higher education as the pressure to illustrate demonstrable skills continues to mount. Simulations may play a role in helping students obtain competencies in specific areas but their ability to assess competencies acquired warrants further research. A solid and rational decision making process is required to accurately determine the effectiveness of using simulations in an MBA program.

Social implications

Simulations allow students to interact with complex systems and ideas but assessing the actual learning that takes place can be challenging (Frezzo, Behrens, and Mislevy). Students still need a conceptual framework of the material being presented in order for the simulations to be meaningful. Finding an effective instructional model which supports both hard (technical or procedural) and soft (people, communication) skills can be challenging as the soft skills are more difficult to quantify. Instituting an effective evaluation and decision process when evaluating these types of assessments is important when determining their value in a classroom.

Originality/value

This case study was based on the decision process of the University and the College of Business Administration in determining how simulations could be used in a competency based MBA program.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 55 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Article

Leon Wong and Yichelle Zhang

The purpose of this paper is to describe certain choices in assessments, in the digital pivot in response to COVID-19.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe certain choices in assessments, in the digital pivot in response to COVID-19.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is a discursive reflection about one’s personal experience and response to COVID-19.

Findings

Communicating suggestions of the changes in advance for feedback, consistency in maintaining the same assessment formats and styles, and being available in real-time during key assessment tasks are important in providing assurance and certainty to students in a time of great uncertainty and stress. Anticipating resource constraints will help to avoid potential system fails. Developing assessments that are authentic in using real-world company filings, the answers to which cannot be readily searched on the internet can significantly reduce the risk of cheating, especially where examination supervision resources are unavailable.

Research limitations/implications

Course assessment choices may be specific to a particular course and may not be applicable to all courses.

Practical implications

Course assessment choices and the rationales for them, may be of applicability to other educators.

Originality/value

This note describes the authors’ personal experiences in adapting to the learning and teaching in the COVID environment.

Details

Accounting Research Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1030-9616

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Article

Kristal Curry and Doug Smith

The purpose of this paper is to present results from three years of a longitudinal “Assessment Attitudes and Practices” survey collected from a large school district in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present results from three years of a longitudinal “Assessment Attitudes and Practices” survey collected from a large school district in the Southern USA.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper focuses on both formative and summative “assessment practices” results from secondary (middle and high school) social studies teachers.

Findings

There was no statistically significant difference between secondary social studies teachers’ use of assessments and secondary teachers of other disciplines, nor was there a statistically significant difference in assessment use by year. Data results by assessment type were ranked in order of how often teachers claimed to use various assessment practices, and discussed in terms of assessment practices recommended by NCSS. Social studies teachers in this study were often more likely to report use of assessments of knowledge (including selected-response items) than performance-based assessment techniques (such as authentic assessments).

Research limitations/implications

The lack of statistically significant differences in assessment practices along disciplinary lines indicates homogeneity in the use of assessments that does not do justice to social studies.

Practical implications

Using Common Core standards or not, having a 1:1 technological environment or not, teacher respondents essentially reported using the same assessments, perhaps because high-stakes assessments did not change.

Social implications

There is a need for professional development that helps teachers see how performance-based assessments can be used to boost student performance on high-stakes assessments.

Originality/value

Studies of actual assessment practices (as opposed to ideas about how teachers should assess) are still quite rare, and provide a helpful window in understanding what is actually happening inside schools.

Details

Social Studies Research and Practice, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1933-5415

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Article

Adriana Ornellas, Kajsa Falkner and Eva Edman Stålbrandt

The purpose of this paper is to introduce a theoretical framework based on authentic learning approaches that can be taken into consideration in higher education (HE…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to introduce a theoretical framework based on authentic learning approaches that can be taken into consideration in higher education (HE) contexts to design activities that enable students to develop employability skills.

Design/methodology/approach

Three methods were used to develop the framework: desk research on current demand and supply of new graduate’s employability skills; interviews in four European HE institutions to identify authentic learning scenarios; and asynchronous online focus group to validate the framework.

Findings

The paper takes a competence-centred approach to the concept of employability skills and sets out a taxonomy of skills required to enhance new graduates’ employability. It also gives criteria and examples of authentic learning scenarios in HE settings that promote the acquisition of these skills.

Research limitations/implications

The framework developed remains theoretical. In a second phase, the framework will be applied to implement authentic activities in different programmes and subjects of five HE institutions, and the results will be reported in future publications.

Practical implications

The framework gives directions to create real and practical ways to enhance new graduates’ employability skills by improving the connection between HE curricula and the demands of the real world.

Originality/value

The added value of the paper lies in adopting a learner-centred, genuine and effective learning approach, such as authentic learning as a catalyst for bringing work experience to formal learning in HE institutions, in order to better develop graduates’ employability skills.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

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