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Book part
Publication date: 10 June 2019

Luciana Crawford-Starks

Many of today’s top organizations have implemented formal mentoring programs as a vital strategy to attract, develop, and retain talent. Human resource professionals have…

Abstract

Many of today’s top organizations have implemented formal mentoring programs as a vital strategy to attract, develop, and retain talent. Human resource professionals have long recognized mentoring programs as an effective method to grow their organization’s intellectual capital and remain competitive. Both qualitative and quantitative research found that mentored employees experience job satisfaction, productivity and career advancement, which in turn creates profitability and cost savings for organizations. Historically, formal workplace mentoring programs were for a select number of employees. Due to time and geography constraints, face-to-face meetings between mentor and protégé were difficult to coordinate. While traditional mentoring programs provide benefit, logistics prohibit these relationships from taking full progression, giving rise to a new alternative: E-Mentoring. E-Mentoring lowers hurdles to participation using synchronous and asynchronous computer-mediated means. Technological advances and forms of computer-mediated communication such as emails, chat groups, and video conferencing offer the potential for enhancing the E-Mentoring process. These new methods help to transcend functional, sectoral, and hierarchical barriers of formal mentoring relationships. Also, the non-face-to-face nature of the E-Mentoring relationship overcomes traditional barriers of age, race, gender, and status, which might negatively affect a traditional mentoring relationship. This chapter defines and compares traditional mentoring with E-Mentoring. It discusses the benefits and challenges of using technology or computer-mediated communication (CMC) for mentoring purposes. The chapter concludes with a discussion of how organizations can implement E-Mentoring as a professional development tool in the age of technology.

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Advances in the Technology of Managing People: Contemporary Issues in Business
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-074-6

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Article
Publication date: 25 September 2020

Mandi MacDonald, Andrew Dellis, Shanaaz Mathews and Jenna-Lee Marco

This paper aims to describe the challenges and potential benefits of moving a mentoring programme for young people in care and care leavers to an online mode of delivery…

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489

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to describe the challenges and potential benefits of moving a mentoring programme for young people in care and care leavers to an online mode of delivery in response to the South African Government’s efforts to curb the spread of the novel coronavirus disease COVID-19.

Design/methodology/approach

A descriptive account incorporating reflections from staff responsible for the move to e-mentoring and from South African and UK researchers undertaking an exploratory study of mentoring vulnerable youth at the time when COVID-19 restrictions were imposed.

Findings

E-mentoring can provide an effective means to maintaining the essential elements of a well-established mentoring programme for young people in care and care leavers under government enforced “lock-down”. E-mentoring presents particular challenges and benefits in the South African context. Youth in care and care leavers have unequal access to a digital infrastructure, but this can be overcome by investment in resourcing, equipping and training carers, mentors and mentees. The geographical reach offered by online platforms gives young people access to a more diverse pool of mentors.

Originality/value

Both care leaving services and the use of e-mentoring to meet the needs of vulnerable young people are emerging areas of practice and research interest. This paper brings the two areas together in the context of South Africa under COVID-19 “lock-down” through describing the response of one mentoring programme and highlighting the benefits and challenges.

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Journal of Children's Services, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-6660

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Article
Publication date: 15 November 2021

Zain Haider and Rabia Dasti

The present correlational research study examined the theoretical and statistical relationship between mentoring, research self-efficacy, work–life balance and the…

Abstract

Purpose

The present correlational research study examined the theoretical and statistical relationship between mentoring, research self-efficacy, work–life balance and the psychological well-being of doctoral program students. The study highlights the positive role of mentoring for uplifting the eudemonic aspects of well-being of doctoral program students of natural sciences.

Design/methodology/approach

A purposive sample (N = 72) of natural sciences doctoral program students was selected from the Higher Education Commission recognized universities of Lahore and Sargodha. Participants' experiences regarding mentoring were operationalized utilizing the Mentorship Effectiveness Scale (Berk et al., 2005). Similarly, their levels of research self-efficacy, work–life balance and psychological well-being were operationalized via the Self-Efficacy in Research Measure (Phillips and Russell, 1994), Work–life Balance Scale (Brough et al., 2014) and Psychological Well-Being Scale (Ryff, 1989), respectively.

Findings

Results indicated that mentoring, research self-efficacy, work–life balance and psychological well-being were significantly positively related to one another. The parallel mediation analysis through the process established the path model of mentoring and psychological well-being. The model highlights the importance of mentoring mechanisms in strengthening research self-efficacy and work–life balance and in turn enhancing the psychological well-being of doctoral program students.

Originality/value

This paper highlights the significance of mentoring for the psychological well-being of doctoral program students. It can guide policymakers and mentors to acknowledge and address the research-based needs of these students in terms of improved well-being and productivity.

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International Journal of Mentoring and Coaching in Education, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6854

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Article
Publication date: 19 April 2011

Randy Emelo

This paper aims to evaluate group mentoring as a large‐scale form of collaborative learning.

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to evaluate group mentoring as a large‐scale form of collaborative learning.

Design/methodology/approach

Researchers used a 12‐question survey and personal interviews to assess the relevancy and success of group mentoring, and its impact on personal productivity/effectiveness and organizational success.

Findings

A total of 93 percent said topics discussed during their group mentoring events were relevant to them and their jobs, and 96 percent reported that they could apply information gained during group mentoring directly to their role in the organization.

Research limitations/implications

Further research with a larger survey population would be valuable, particularly as the use of group mentoring expands.

Practical implications

Group mentoring can replace costly classroom training, allowing more people to gain useful and practical knowledge in a setting that supports large‐scale productivity and effectiveness back on the job.

Originality/value

All content in this paper is new. Readers will discover the latest research and trends in group mentoring and collaborative learning.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 43 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2000

Bob Garvey and Geof Alred

The article is in three parts. The first, based on survey data, looks at the extent of and the provision for development for mentors and those interested in mentoring. The…

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2680

Abstract

The article is in three parts. The first, based on survey data, looks at the extent of and the provision for development for mentors and those interested in mentoring. The second part is a discussion about ideas on learning and their relationship to mentoring. It draws on some issues raised by the survey material and highlights the need for a mentor development based on specific contexts and a learner‐centred approach. The third element of the article offers a development programme for mentors devised and used by the authors.

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Career Development International, vol. 5 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

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Article
Publication date: 5 September 2016

Linda J. Searby and Denise Armstrong

The purpose of this paper is to introduce readers to the special issue on “middle space” education leaders (those individuals who are second-in-command in schools). The…

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612

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to introduce readers to the special issue on “middle space” education leaders (those individuals who are second-in-command in schools). The special issue contains papers pertaining to mentoring those preparing for and aspiring to the assistant school leader role, as well as papers on programs that support new assistant principals/vice-principals through mentoring and coaching. The authors provide background on middle space leadership and mentoring from existing research literature, introduce the international papers selected for the issue, and identify unifying themes across the papers.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors provide highlights of relevant research literature on the importance of mentoring for school leaders in general, but also specifically address the need for mentoring for middle space leaders from the scant literature that exists on the topic. After reviewing the relevant literature, the authors provide an overview of the seven papers that were chosen for the issue through a rigorous peer-review process.

Findings

The co-editors of this special issue identify common themes that emerged from the papers chosen for the issue. In general, authors note that middle space leaders have unique mentoring and coaching needs, and there are few formal programs that address their needs. However, there is a growing awareness of the need to support assistant principals through structured mentoring programs, as well as preparing and mentoring those who aspire to the position.

Research limitations/implications

The seven papers chosen for the special issue represent a variety of research methodologies. A limitation is that the majority of the studies are qualitative, with small sample populations. However, even with small sample sizes, commonalities can be seen across the studies and across international contexts.

Practical implications

This review summarizes the issues facing middle space leaders in education and how they can be effectively addressed. The global audience that can benefit from engaging with the papers in this special issue includes educational leadership faculty, educational governing bodies, policymakers, school district central office personnel, senior principals, and assistant principals themselves.

Originality/value

This paper and the seven that follow extend the scant research literature in the realm of middle space leaders in education. They provide unique insights – from different international contexts including the USA, Canada, Hong Kong, and New Zealand – into the need for and potential benefits of mentoring and coaching aspiring and new middle space leaders.

Details

International Journal of Mentoring and Coaching in Education, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6854

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Article
Publication date: 8 January 2018

Nuria Gisbert-Trejo, Jon Landeta, Eneka Albizu and Pilar Fernández-Ferrín

The changing nature of work dynamics demands that managers keep up-to-date in skills, knowledge, and competencies. Besides, nowadays these professionals need to understand…

Abstract

Purpose

The changing nature of work dynamics demands that managers keep up-to-date in skills, knowledge, and competencies. Besides, nowadays these professionals need to understand the business beyond the frontiers of their own organizations. This phenomenon has led to new forms of alternative mentoring for managers and entrepreneurs, as companies battle for talent in a globalized way. Professional associations, consultancy firms, and other agents are starting to offer mentoring programs in which the mentor and mentee often belong to different organizations or take place within a group.

Design/methodology/approach

The purpose of this study is to present a conceptual model for alternative mentoring for managers. This model is a new approach to mentoring, and it will try to clarify some of the bases of a phenomenon that is increasingly present in the managerial field.

Findings

The paper also suggests some advantages of alternative mentoring when compared to traditional mentoring.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to a better understanding of new forms of alternative mentoring while providing practitioners in the field with a better understanding of key issues for alternative mentoring.

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest, vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1988

Audrey Collin

The significance of the mentor in organisations has been clearly established in the management literature. Having first defined mentoring and described the roles of mentor…

Abstract

The significance of the mentor in organisations has been clearly established in the management literature. Having first defined mentoring and described the roles of mentor and protégé, the distinction between “essential” and “instrumental” mentoring is noted. The reasons for the present interest in this topic is discussed and the purposes for which formal mentoring programmes are established are indicated. The several steps to be take in setting‐up a programme are outlined, some of the problems which might be encountered are identified and what such a programme might achieve is indicated.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2014

Tom William Short

This article is written in two parts and is presented as research-based insight on the growth of formal workplace mentoring programs and the alignment of mentoring with…

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2145

Abstract

Purpose

This article is written in two parts and is presented as research-based insight on the growth of formal workplace mentoring programs and the alignment of mentoring with workforce development strategy.

Design/methodology/approach

The research is taken from a two-year study conducted in the Australian rail industry aimed at establishing a harmonized approach to the use of workplace mentoring. Using mixed-methods and an interpretive approach seven major rail organizations from Australia and New Zealand contributed to detailed case studies, on-line surveys and in-depth interviews. Responses were obtained from all levels and functional areas within the organizations

Findings

Research findings support the literature and show a growing interest in the use of formal workplace mentoring to deal with a wide range of organizational issues such as employee retention, engagement, absence and turnover. Importantly, mentoring was found to be highly valued in the area of knowledge transfer and especially across multi-generational groups. In parallel with other traditional industries, rail organizations in Australia are about to lose large volumes of highly qualified and long-serving Baby-Boomers. Therefore, workforce development strategies will need to facilitate the transfer of tacit knowledge to a new generation of rail employees who are eager to learn, but less conformable with formal training courses. Mentoring is becoming an effective option for delivering this change.

Research limitations/implications

The findings are contextual and may not fit all settings, but they offer a comparative account of workplace mentoring in an industry facing perpetual change, economic challenges and an impending shortage of skills in key areas.

Practical implications

These articles have practical implications for human resource practitioners and professionals involved in the implementation of workforce development projects. Mentoring is an old concept enjoying new fame, but the intrinsic nature of mentoring, such as the need for highly-trusted relationships and confidential meetings means that organizations should tread carefully as they can engage mentees at a deep psychological level.

Originality/value

These articles will be of value to human resource professionals and managers, assisting them to think differently about workplace mentoring and consider how the characteristics of mentoring are interdependent with the broader goals of workforce development.

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2011

Beth N. Carvin

This paper seeks to examine the methodologies for developing a group mentoring component as an add‐on to an existing or new corporate mentoring program.

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2969

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to examine the methodologies for developing a group mentoring component as an add‐on to an existing or new corporate mentoring program.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper defines group mentoring and explains the differences between group mentoring and classroom training. It provides the hallmarks of mentoring that should exist in a group mentoring program along with the individual development areas that can be successfully addressed through group mentoring. Also included are seven tips for starting and sustaining a group mentoring program. These tips cover areas such as the optimal group structure, logistics, the use of facilitators, obstacles and measuring the success of the program.

Findings

When implemented correctly, mentoring groups have proven to be a successful training and development strategy. Some of the documented outcomes for participants are increased confidence, expanded understanding of the organization and increased commitment and connectedness to the organization.

Originality/value

Training and development managers who are struggling to expand their mentoring programs can use the information provided in the paper to add group mentoring to their mentorship program.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 43 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

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