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Article
Publication date: 6 September 2021

Levent Altinay and Hasan Evrim Arici

Drawing on chaos theory as an overarching approach, as well as guidelines from effectuation and transformative learning theories, this study aims to evaluate the changing…

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing on chaos theory as an overarching approach, as well as guidelines from effectuation and transformative learning theories, this study aims to evaluate the changing marketing channels in the hospitality industry in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic. It also aims to develop a conceptual framework that demonstrates the transformation of the marketing structure; in particular, the transformation of hospitality organizations, employees and customers.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses the hermeneutic method and conceptually evaluates the existing actors of the services marketing structure. It also discusses how to transform this structure into the new normal in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Findings

The findings of the study demonstrated that COVID-19 has resulted in changing marketing channels in the hospitality industry. These include external, internal, interactive and substitutional marketing channels. In response to these changes, the hospitality industry needs to adopt a more transformative marketing structure that requires the transformation of hospitality companies, employees and customers.

Research limitations/implications

The conceptualized transformation of the services marketing structure could help hospitality practitioners, employees and customers to understand the new normal and acquire new abilities, meanings, awareness and learning accordingly.

Originality/value

This study uses chaos, effectuation and transformative learning theories to reconceptualize the hospitality services marketing structure. The contribution of this paper lies in the conceptual pathways it suggests for transforming hospitality firms, employees and customers and for demonstrating their transformed roles and positions in the wake of the pandemic.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Article
Publication date: 2 August 2021

Leandro da Silva Nascimento, Fernanda Kalil Steinbruch, Daniel Max de Sousa Oliveira, Júlio César da Costa Júnior and Fernando Bins Luce

Due to social enterprises' (SEs) relevance to social value creation, marketing increases its attention to these hybrid organizations. However, there is no consensus on how…

Abstract

Purpose

Due to social enterprises' (SEs) relevance to social value creation, marketing increases its attention to these hybrid organizations. However, there is no consensus on how strategic marketing can improve SE performance. Thus, this paper aims to discuss how commercial, social and societal strategic marketing approaches relate to compensatory and transformative social entrepreneurship scopes to improve SE performance.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is conceptual. We hold discussions and raise reflections to advance knowledge on both marketing and social entrepreneurship fields, more precisely by intertwining them.

Findings

We develop a conceptual model for adapting three strategic marketing approaches to compensatory and transformative SEs. We argue that SEs have three types of performances: commercial, social and societal. Social and commercial strategic marketing are essential for SEs acting in compensating local failures of capitalism. Societal and commercial strategic marketing are essential for SEs focused on transformative actions to changing global system. Such relations can leverage social impact, which we conceptualize as compensatory or transformative.

Practical implications

The model contributes to improvements on strategic marketing decisions by marketers and entrepreneurs in social entrepreneurship.

Originality/value

We propose a decomposition of strategic marketing into three approaches: commercial, social and societal, which constitutes a novelty to the field. This can facilitate management of SEs with different actions and performances, whether at local or international levels.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 39 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Article
Publication date: 25 August 2021

Afshin Tanouri, Ann-Marie Kennedy and Ekant Veer

Although the concept of transformative gamification is mentioned in previous research, no research has provided a theoretically based explanation of how gamification can…

Abstract

Purpose

Although the concept of transformative gamification is mentioned in previous research, no research has provided a theoretically based explanation of how gamification can lead to transformative change. This paper aims to provide the explanation for the first time by combining storytelling elements with cognitive behavioural therapy logic and incorporating these into a framework to show the process of transformative behaviour change through gamification. The proposed framework not only furthers the theoretical understanding of transformative gamification services but also provides practical insight into design and implication of such services.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is based on critical analysis and synthesis of literature from different fields of research such as transformative service research (TSR), gamification, game studies, social marketing, storytelling and journalism. Ergo, several propositions based on the extensive literature review are proposed and aggregated in a conceptual framework.

Findings

This paper argues that apart from game mechanics that are often considered as an inseparable aspect of gamification services, immersive storytelling and a mechanism to encourage reflection are the pivotal components of transformative gamification services. In addition, this paper suggests that although reflection and immersive storytelling are often considered as opposite sides of the spectrum, they can have a synergistic effect once they work in tandem in gamification services.

Originality/value

This paper proposes a novel framework and an operational definition for transformative gamification services. It contributes to TSR, gamification and health promotion research through differentiating this concept from similar concepts, such as mHealth, propelling gamification to a more meaningful and user-centric version and providing service researchers with a practical guide to make use of gamification as a tool to serve TSR.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 17 December 2016

Poula Helth

The purpose of this chapter is to document how a new learning technic may create transformative learning in leadership in an organisational practice.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this chapter is to document how a new learning technic may create transformative learning in leadership in an organisational practice.

Design/methodology/approach

The learning methods developed in the learning in practice (LIP) project include aesthetic performances combined with reflections. The intention has been to explore how leadership may be transformed, when leaders work as a collective of leaders. The learning methods developed and tested in the LIP project are art-informed learning methods, concepts of liminality and reflection processes carried out in the leaders’ organisational practice.

Findings

One of the most important findings in the LIP project in relation to transformative learning is a new learning technique based on guided processes rooted in aesthetic performance combined with reflections and separation of roles as performer and audience. Reflection processes related to aesthetic performance serve as argument for the impact of ‘the audience wheel’.

Originality/value

Leaders who perform and reflect in a collective of leaders can better deal with complex organisational problems and enhance growing of welfare-in-the-making from an inside and out perspective. Moreover, the separation between classroom teaching and practical intervention will diminish when leaders learn aesthetic performance and reflections as a practical technique.

Details

Developing Public Managers for a Changing World
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-080-0

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Article
Publication date: 13 May 2021

Giovanni Schiuma, Eva Schettini, Francesco Santarsiero and Daniela Carlucci

In the digital age, companies require leaders to foster digital transformation entrepreneurship, i.e. the organisational attitude and orientation of the creation of a new…

Abstract

Purpose

In the digital age, companies require leaders to foster digital transformation entrepreneurship, i.e. the organisational attitude and orientation of the creation of a new business or the development of an existing business by having at the core or embracing digital transformation as the continuous development and application of digital knowledge for companies' value creation. This paper identifies six critical competencies distinguishing the transformative leadership profile supporting enterprises' digital transformation development.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper, through a critical literature review focussing on three research streams, i.e. wise, transformative and digital leadership, addresses the following research question: What competencies characterise a digital transformative leader promoting and encouraging digital transformation entrepreneurship? Methodologically, first, explorative analysis of the literature has been carried out exploring the role and relevance of leadership in driving companies' digital transformation. Second, focussing on the three leadership perspectives, wise, transformative and digital, the critical features distinguishing each view have been identified. A set of hypotheses has been formulated to develop a framework to profile a digital transformative leader. In the third stage, the framework of the digital transformative leadership compass has been developed.

Findings

The paper profiles the digital transformative leader, a critical figure in companies competing in the digital age to nurture digital transformation entrepreneurship. Six specific competencies are synthesised and proposed throughout the transformative leadership compass. It is presented as an interpretative framework helpful to understand what affects the organisational culture and behaviours driving digital transformation. The proposed model defines theoretical foundations to operationalise an assessment framework and developing empirical research about leadership characteristics hampering and enabling successful companies' digital transformation.

Originality/value

The study proposes a novel framework based upon a critical analysis of the leadership literature. Combining insights gathered from the literature review on transformative, wise and digital leadership, the need for nurturing a transformative digital leadership allowing enterprises to stay competitive and able to change and adapt to the scenario's evolution emerged. Accordingly, the paper defines the digital transformative leader as a leadership profile sustaining organisational and digital transformation. The transformative leadership compass is proposed as a model to outline the critical competencies distinguishing a digital transformative leader capable of driving continuous company innovation and specifically digital transformation entrepreneurship.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 18 November 2019

Tonya G. Ensign

In the field of global leadership, much of the research has focused on uncovering competencies and methods for assessing competencies. The process of developing global…

Abstract

In the field of global leadership, much of the research has focused on uncovering competencies and methods for assessing competencies. The process of developing global leaders has been researched less frequently; however, it is widely accepted that this process involves learning on the part of the leader. Mezirow’s (1978, 1991) transformative learning is a special type of learning in the domain of adult education and a useful lens to better understand the disorienting triggers that are thought to induce global leadership development (GLD). In simple terms, a disorienting experience occurs when we discover that something we thought was certain is now uncertain. Conducting business in another country or merely navigating to a grocery store or restaurant there can be a disorienting experience. In these situations, people are exposed to new information that does not fit their current meaning structures or thought paradigms, and at this juncture, people have a choice: to transform their perspective or remain unchanged. When individuals transform their perspective, they are experiencing transformative learning. The first section of this chapter reviews the concept of disorienting experiences across disciplines and within the domain of learning and education. The second section explains three GLD process models with a special focus on the role played by disorienting trigger events in each one. The final section explains the Disorientation Index (Ensign, 2019), which articulates dimensions of trigger events. The chapter concludes with future research directions and practical implications.

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Article
Publication date: 27 January 2021

Ahir Gopaldas, Marina Carnevale, Richard Kedzior and Anton Siebert

The marketing literature on service conversation in dyadic services has elaborated two approaches. An advisory approach involves providers giving customers expert advice…

Abstract

Purpose

The marketing literature on service conversation in dyadic services has elaborated two approaches. An advisory approach involves providers giving customers expert advice on how to advance difficult projects. By contrast, a relational approach involves providers exchanging social support with customers to develop commercial friendships. Inspired by the transformative turn in service research, this study aims to develop a third approach, one that helps customers to cultivate their own agency, potential and well-being.

Design/methodology/approach

The emergent model of service conversation is based on in-depth interviews with providers and clients of mental health services, including psychological counseling, psychotherapy and personal coaching.

Findings

A transformative approach to service conversation involves the iterative application of a complementary pair of conversational practices: seeding microtransformations by asking questions to inspire new ways of thinking, feeling and acting; and nurturing microtransformations via non-evaluative listening to affirm customers’ explorations of new possibilities. This pair of practices immediately elevates customers’ sense of psychological freedom, which, in turn, enables their process of self-transformation, one microtransformation at a time.

Practical implications

This study offers dyadic service providers a conceptual framework of advisory, relational and transformative approaches to service conversation for instrumental, communal and developmental service encounters, respectively. This framework can help dyadic service providers to conduct more collaborative, flexible and productive conversations with their customers.

Originality/value

Three approaches to service conversation – advisory, relational and transformative – are conceptually distinguished in terms of their overall aims, provider practices, customer experiences, customer outcomes, allocations of airtime, designations of expertise, application contexts, prototypical examples and blind spots.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 35 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 29 June 2020

Rebekah Russell–Bennett, Rory Mulcahy, Kate Letheren, Ryan McAndrew and Uwe Dulleck

A transformative service aims to improve wellbeing; however, current approaches have an implicit assumption that all wellbeing dimensions are equal and more dimensions led…

Abstract

Purpose

A transformative service aims to improve wellbeing; however, current approaches have an implicit assumption that all wellbeing dimensions are equal and more dimensions led to higher wellbeing. The purpose of this paper is to present evidence for a new framework that identifies the paradox of competing wellbeing dimensions for both the individual and others in society – the transformative service paradox (TSP).

Design/methodology/approach

Data is drawn from a mixed-method approach using qualitative (interviews) and quantitative data (lab experiment) in an electricity service context. The first study involves 45 household interviews (n = 118) and deals with the nature of trade-offs at the individual level to establish the concept of the TSP. The second study uses a behavioral economics laboratory experiment (n = 110) to test the self vs. other nature of the trade-off in day-to-day use of electricity.

Findings

The interviews and experiment identified that temporal (now vs. future) and beneficiary-level factors explain why individuals make wellbeing trade-offs for the transformative service of electricity. The laboratory experiment showed that when the future implication of the trade-off is made salient, consumers are more willing to forego physical wellbeing for environmental wellbeing, whereas when the “now” implication is more salient consumers forego financial wellbeing for physical wellbeing.

Originality/value

This research introduces the term “Transformative Service Paradox” and identifies two factors that explain why consumers make wellbeing trade-offs at the individual level and at the societal level; temporal (now vs. future) and wellbeing beneficiary.

Details

Journal of Service Management, vol. 31 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 24 September 2020

Chang-kyu Kwon, Seung-hyun Han and Aliki Nicolaides

The purpose of this study is to examine the impact of psychological safety on transformative learning in the workplace. This study focused on psychological safety as a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the impact of psychological safety on transformative learning in the workplace. This study focused on psychological safety as a specific practice that may or may not independently contribute to transformative learning outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

Data was gathered from 132 employees in one US manufacturing company through a survey asking about the perception of psychological safety and the experience of transformative learning. A mediation analysis was conducted to test the effects of transformative learning processes – social support, attitude toward uncertainty and criticality – on the relationship between psychological safety and transformative learning outcomes.

Findings

The results of this study showed that psychological safety led to transformative learning outcomes mediated by transformative learning processes including social support, attitude toward uncertainty and criticality.

Originality/value

Existing literature reveals little about the mechanism of how transformative learning occurs in the workplace. This study contributes to the field of human resource development by explaining the relationship between psychological safety and transformative learning, as well as first attempting to use transformative learning as a viable construct in workplace research.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 32 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 12 June 2020

Heini Taiminen, Kimmo Taiminen and Juha Munnukka

This study aims to understand how online weight loss services could help customers achieve a durable change. The particular focus is on exploring the roles of value…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to understand how online weight loss services could help customers achieve a durable change. The particular focus is on exploring the roles of value co-creation and well-being outcomes in reinforcing the transformative value potential, which is argued to be realized as customers’ intentions to continue a healthier lifestyle after the service period has ended.

Design/methodology/approach

Data was collected from the participants of an online weight loss service (n =498), and a conceptual research model was tested using structural equation modelling.

Findings

The results imply that compliance with the guidelines and social support are two value co-creation activities that can influence the well-being outcomes of transformative services (i.e. perceived behavioral control and satisfaction with one’s achievements). These well-being outcomes help attain the transformative value potential of online weight loss services. However, the actual weight loss affected the transformative value potential only through customers’ satisfaction with their achievements as a subjective well-being outcome.

Originality/value

This study provides insight into the transformative value potential of services in the weight loss context. This study contributes to the transformative service research by focusing on the role of online services in reinforcing a durable change through the co-creation of value and improvements in customers’ well-being.

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