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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2021

Mahdi Salehi, Safoura Rouhi, Mohana Usefi Moghadam and Faezeh Faramarzi

Success in corporate relative performance is one of the factors for the growth and durability of firms. Since the relative performance is a function of managers' decisions…

Abstract

Purpose

Success in corporate relative performance is one of the factors for the growth and durability of firms. Since the relative performance is a function of managers' decisions and such decisions are under the influence of behavioral and psychological characteristics, this paper aims to assess the managers’ and auditors’ narcissism's effect on the management team's stability relative to corporate performance.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper has used the signature magnitude for examining narcissism and the regression model of Jenter and Kanaan (2015) for assessing relative corporate performance. The logistic regression is used to test the model of the management team's stability, and the multivariate regression is used to test the model of relative corporate performance. Research hypotheses were also examined using a sample of 768 listed year-companies on the Tehran Stock Exchange during 2012–2017 and by employing a panel data approach and fixed effects method.

Findings

The obtained results show a negative and significant relationship between managers' and auditors' narcissism and the management team's stability. The relationship between the narcissism of managers and auditors and relative corporate performance is positive and significant. Moreover, managers' narcissism positively and significantly impacts the relationship between auditors' narcissism and team management stability. A negative and significant relationship is evident between auditors’ narcissism and relative corporate performance.

Originality/value

This study's results can identify the effect of psychological components such as narcissism on people's performance by directing and influencing their decisions. Many studies have been conducted on narcissism, but none of them have examined the impact auditors’ and managers' narcissism has on the management team's stability and the corporate relative performance. Therefore, considering the importance of success in the corporate relative performance and benefits of the management team's stability, this study's results can reveal the importance of such features in accounting research. Also, the results of this research can make it important to know more about financial behavioral theory.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

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Article
Publication date: 12 August 2020

Jie Yang, Mingchao Chang, Jian Li, Lulu Zhou, Feng Tian and JiangJiang Zhang

Based on the social information processing theory, the purpose of this study is to propose a conceptualized moderated mediation model for testing the linkage between…

Abstract

Purpose

Based on the social information processing theory, the purpose of this study is to propose a conceptualized moderated mediation model for testing the linkage between leader narcissism and employees’ innovative behavior through the mediating effect of employees’ cognitive dependency and the moderating effect of environmental uncertainty between employees’ cognitive dependency and their innovative behavior.

Design/methodology/approach

In this study, multisource data from 266 employees and their supervisors in 11 large high-tech Chinese companies were collected through a field study and an online survey. The hypotheses were tested using structural equation modeling and bootstrapping.

Findings

The results of this study show that leader narcissism has a negative impact on employees’ innovative behavior and that employees’ cognitive dependency plays a mediating role between leader narcissism and employees’ innovative behavior. Cognitive dependency and environmental uncertainty play moderated mediation roles between leader narcissism and employees’ innovative behavior.

Research limitations/implications

In the future, longitudinal research and experimental methods can be used to avoid common method bias. Further studies could allow leaders to evaluate environmental uncertainty and explore the emotional path by which leader narcissism has negative effects on followers’ innovation from social information processing theory. In addition, future studies can explore cognitive dependency more deeply from the perspectives of forced obedience and active worship.

Practical implications

Organizations should warn leaders to control the dark side of narcissism and minimize environmental uncertainty to reduce barriers to innovation.

Originality/value

This study constructs the path of the effect of leader narcissism on employees’ innovation through employees’ cognitive dependency in a specific context, which enriches theoretical research on the link between leaders’ traits and employees’ innovative behavior. Along with the finding of leader narcissism’s negative effect on employees’ innovative behavior, this study explores the dark side of leader narcissism in the context of China’s high-tech firms and environmental uncertainty.

Details

Chinese Management Studies, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-614X

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Article
Publication date: 24 August 2020

Widya Paramita, Felix Septianto, Rokhima Rostiani, Sari Winahjoe and Handini Audita

This study aims to empirically test the proposition that high narcissistic consumers are more likely to perform donation-related behavior, such as the intention to donate…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to empirically test the proposition that high narcissistic consumers are more likely to perform donation-related behavior, such as the intention to donate and to share the donation link, compared to low narcissistic consumers when the organization’s reputation is high. Built upon the evolutionary psychology theory, this study proposes that narcissism activates the status motive, and the relationship between narcissism, organization reputation and donation-related behavior can be explained by status motive.

Design/methodology/approach

The current research comprises two between-subject experimental studies that use both measured and manipulated narcissism subsequently, whereas the organization’s reputation was manipulated in both studies.

Findings

The results demonstrate that narcissistic consumers are more likely to donate and to share the donation advertisement when the donation organization is perceived as having a high (vs low) prestige. Further, the status motive mediates the effect of narcissism on donation decisions only when the donation organization is perceived as having high (vs low) prestige.

Research limitations/implications

This research’s main limitation is that it only examines two alternate ways to improve perceived organization’s reputation (e.g. highlight the organization’s reputational features and link to reputable entities such as celebrities), although organizational literature suggests that perceived organization reputation can be improved in many ways.

Practical implications

From a practical perspective, social marketers and donation organizations potentially benefit from this research because it demonstrates that high narcissistic consumers potentially involve in donation-related behaviors more than consumers with low narcissism when the organization is perceived as highly reputable.

Originality/value

The current research contributes to the narcissism literature and adds to the evolutionary psychology theory by providing empirical evidence that narcissism, whether manifesting as a trait or a state, can activate a status motive that leads to prosocial behavior, but only when the donation organization is perceived as prestigious.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

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Book part
Publication date: 10 August 2011

Suzy Fox and Arthur Freeman

We link counterproductive work behavior (CWB) (particularly workplace bullying) and organizational citizenship behavior to individual narcissism and organizational…

Abstract

We link counterproductive work behavior (CWB) (particularly workplace bullying) and organizational citizenship behavior to individual narcissism and organizational culture. We link counterproductive work culture in turn to organizations' leader(s), enumerating multiple roles an executive may play: actor, target, ignorer, enabler, rewarder, or, ultimately, champion of change. Both positive (citizenship) and negative (counterproductive) behaviors are associated with narcissism, a complex, multifaceted set of personality characteristics, primarily based on the individual's cognitive interpretation of self and the world. Theoretical interpretations of reactive CWB (stressor-emotion-control theory) and instrumental CWB (theory of planned behavior) support the development of coaching and counseling interventions. Cognitive behavioral theory (CBT)-based prescriptive executive coaching is proposed as a promising mechanism for redirecting narcissistic organizational players from counterproductive to citizenship schemas and behaviors.

Details

The Role of Individual Differences in Occupational Stress and Well Being
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-711-7

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Article
Publication date: 3 September 2020

Tom Aabo, Mikkel Als, Lars Thomsen and Jesper N. Wulff

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the role of CEO narcissism in corporate acquisitions with a focus on frequency and size and furthermore to examine the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the role of CEO narcissism in corporate acquisitions with a focus on frequency and size and furthermore to examine the subsequent stock market reaction.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors investigate 751 acquisitions made by 158 UK nonfinancial firms and 202 CEOs in the 10-year period 2007–2016. The authors use the ratio of first-person singular pronouns to total first-person pronouns in CEO speech as the main proxy for CEO narcissism but the results are robust to the use of signature size and picture as alternative measures.

Findings

The authors find that increased CEO narcissism is associated with an increase in M&A expenditures, an increase in deal size and a decrease in deal frequency. Thus, the authors find that narcissistic CEOs favor size over frequency (“go big”). Furthermore, the authors find that the stock market reacts less favorably to acquisitions announced by firms run by narcissistic CEOs.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to upper echelon research by investigating the association between CEO narcissism and corporate decisions in a UK setting. More specifically, the paper contributes to the existing literature by investigating how CEO narcissism is associated with corporate acquisitions in terms of the size and frequency of deals and how such irrational behavior is penalized by the stock market. Previous literature has focused on the more broad association between CEO narcissism and M&A expenditures.

Details

Review of Behavioral Finance, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1940-5979

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Article
Publication date: 16 April 2020

Tom Aabo, Frederik Hoejland and Jesper Pedersen

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the role of narcissistic supply for the association between CEO narcissism and corporate risk taking.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the role of narcissistic supply for the association between CEO narcissism and corporate risk taking.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors investigate a sample of 281 non-financial S&P 1500 firms and a corresponding 457 CEOs in the 10-yr period 2006–2015.

Findings

The association between CEO narcissism and corporate risk taking depends on the admiration, attention, and affirmation of own superiority (“narcissistic supply”) that the CEO receives given her/his current position. Thus, a narcissistic CEO with an insufficient narcissistic supply (small firm/small compensation) will crave for more and take more risks (“rock the boat”) while a narcissistic CEO with a sufficient narcissistic supply (large firm/large compensation) will protect the status quo and be reluctant to take new risks. Specifically, the authors find that a change from a slightly narcissistic CEO to a strongly narcissistic CEO, for positions entailing limited (abundant) narcissistic supply, is associated with an increase (a decrease) in corporate risk of 6%–8% (11%–27%).

Originality/value

Previous research indicates a positive association between CEO narcissism and corporate risk taking in specific domains such as M&A and R&D activities. This paper provides a novel contribution to the existing literature by identifying and assessing the important role of narcissistic supply for the association between CEO narcissism and corporate risk taking in general.

Details

Review of Behavioral Finance, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1940-5979

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Article
Publication date: 6 April 2020

Kiran Sakkar Sudha and M. Ghazi Shahnawaz

The present study explored the direct as well as indirect relationships between narcissism personality trait and performance. Two leadership styles (task oriented and…

Abstract

Purpose

The present study explored the direct as well as indirect relationships between narcissism personality trait and performance. Two leadership styles (task oriented and authoritarian styles) were identified as possible mediators.

Design/methodology/approach

Narcissism was measured by using Narcissistic Personality Inventory (Ames et al., 2006), performance was measured by performance scale (Greene-Shortridge, 2008). Sinha's leadership scale (Sinha, 2008) was used to measure task-oriented and authoritarian leadership styles. 273 senior-level managers of a big public sector Indian organization participated in the study. SPSS 22 and SmartPLS 2.0 were used to analyze the data.

Findings

Correlation result shows that narcissism personality trait was positively related to authoritarian leadership style and negatively to task-oriented leadership style, task performance and teamwork dimensions of performance. Task-oriented leadership style mediated the relationship between narcissism and task performance and teamwork more than the authoritarian leadership style.

Originality/value

The study attempts to empirically test the behavioral manifestation of narcissism personality trait as positive or negative and has considered the whole measure of performance which has not been previously explored. Practical implications were also highlighted beside the theoretical concerns.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 41 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 24 December 2019

Zhuolin She, Quan Li, Manuel London, Baiyin Yang and Bin Yang

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationships between CEO narcissism and strategic decision-making (SDM) processes (decision comprehensiveness and decision…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationships between CEO narcissism and strategic decision-making (SDM) processes (decision comprehensiveness and decision speed), and to explore the mediating role of top management team (TMT) members’ participation in decision making and the moderating role of TMT power distance.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from a multisource, time-lagged survey of 103 CEOs and their corresponding TMT members in China. Structural equation modeling was used to test the hypothesized relationships.

Findings

The results indicated that CEO narcissism was negatively related to decision comprehensiveness and positively related to decision speed. These relationships were mediated by TMT members’ participation in decision making, especially when TMT power distance was high.

Practical implications

The results show the potential negative effects of CEOs’ narcissistic personality and suggest ways to attenuate it by increasing TMT participation and decreasing TMT power distance.

Originality/value

This study is an initial attempt to empirically examine how and under what conditions CEOs’ narcissism is a barrier to more comprehensive and more deliberate (slower) SDM.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 35 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Article
Publication date: 12 August 2019

Manuel London

Drawing on existing theory, a model is developed to illustrate how the interaction between leaders and followers similarity in narcissism and goal congruence may influence…

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing on existing theory, a model is developed to illustrate how the interaction between leaders and followers similarity in narcissism and goal congruence may influence subgroup formation in teams, and how this interaction influences team identification and team performance.

Design/methodology/approach

The proposed model draws on dominance complementary, similarity attraction, faultline formation and trait activation theories.

Findings

Leader–follower similarity in narcissism and goal congruence may stimulate subgroup formation, possibly resulting in conformers, conspirators, outsiders and victims, especially when performance pressure on a team is high. Followers who are low in narcissism and share goals with a leader who is narcissistic are likely to become conformers. Followers who are high in narcissism and share goals with a narcissistic leader are likely to become confederates. Followers who do not share goals with a narcissistic leader will be treated by the leader and other members as outsiders if they are high in narcissism, and victimized if they are low in narcissism. In addition, the emergence of these subgroups leads to reduced team identification and lower team performance.

Practical implications

Higher level managers, coaches and human resource professions can assess and, if necessary, counteract low team identification and performance resulting from the narcissistic personality characteristics of leaders and followers.

Originality/value

The model addresses how and under what conditions narcissistic leaders and followers may influence subgroup formation and team outcomes.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 34 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Article
Publication date: 18 November 2019

Loukas N. Anninos, Alexandra Paraskevi Chytiri and Leonidas Chytiris

The purpose of this paper is twofold: first, to examine the level of narcissism and its individual traits in students who study business, in the particular context of a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is twofold: first, to examine the level of narcissism and its individual traits in students who study business, in the particular context of a regional country such as Greece; and, second, to test how several demographic variables are related to narcissism levels.

Design/methodology/approach

The study consists of a theoretical part on narcissism in business education and an empirical part that was based on a survey conducted with the use of a questionnaire. The analysis includes hypothesis testing and basic statistical tests.

Findings

Findings suggest that sex, study levels, years of business experience and (personal/family) income do impact specific narcissistic dimensions, which may be a cause for concern both for employers and higher education providers.

Research limitations/implications

The study was conducted in a regional country, the participants were students of public higher education institutions only and the questionnaire was self-reported, which could lead to likely social desirability effects.

Practical implications

The investigation of narcissism in the Greek business education might be of interest to business education providers (for providing curriculum that help future managers/leaders to deploy the positive characteristics of narcissism and avoid or not to develop the negative ones) and to future employers to apply more effective human resource practices, i.e. selection, training, rewarding.

Originality/value

The study at hand aimed to investigate the presence of narcissism and its individual (narcissistic) behavioral dimensions in students studying business in Greece.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

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