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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2004

Carsten K.W. De Dreu, Dirk van Dierendonck and Maria T.M. Dijkstra

Conflict theory and research largely ignored the possible relationships between conflict at work, and individual health, well‐being, and job satisfaction. We present a…

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Abstract

Conflict theory and research largely ignored the possible relationships between conflict at work, and individual health, well‐being, and job satisfaction. We present a model that argues that poor health and well‐being can trigger conflict in the workplace, and reduce the extent to which conflict is managed in a constructive, problem solving way. The model further proposes that conflict, especially when managed poorly, can have negative long‐term consequences for individual health and well‐being, producing psychosomatic complaints and feelings of burnout. We review research evidence and conclude, among other things, that the model is more likely to hold up when conflict involves relationships and socio‐emotional, rather than task‐related issues. Avenues for future research and implications for policy and organizational design are discussed.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 June 2022

Roger Lee Mendoza

This study aims to explore the use and relevance of WALYs (well-being-adjusted life years) in light of the utilitarian premises of neoclassical economics that continue to…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore the use and relevance of WALYs (well-being-adjusted life years) in light of the utilitarian premises of neoclassical economics that continue to dominate health outcomes evaluation. QALYs (quality-adjusted life years) and DALYs (disability-adjusted life years) measure longevity and quality of life in terms of purely health-related aspects and outcomes of medical interventions. However, evaluative questions of subjective well-being may be equally important in comparing outcomes and cost-effectiveness of these interventions.

Design/methodology/approach

A two-phase online search strategy for refereed research on dry eye treatment with omega-3 fatty acids (omega-3s) was adopted. Phase I aimed to identify and contrast clinical parameters of efficacy in omega-3 dietary supplementation. Phase II aimed to find a preference-based, multi-attribute utility instrument specific and sensitive enough to dry eye and its consequences on patients’ subjective well-being. We then illustrate how WALYs can be conceptualized and calculated based on the search results.

Findings

Empiric therapies like omega-3s can be assessed in terms of reducing or relieving symptomatic discomfort and pain, and enabling the patient to enjoy life and derive satisfaction from daily activities. We find in VisQoL (Vision and Quality of Life Index) a viable alternative to conventional multi-attribute utility instruments, including those typically used in QALY and DALY calculations. Clinical efficacy indices of dry eye can be linked to VisQoL’s quality of life dimensions. Differently weighted outcomes can be aggregated. And WALYs per patient per year can be computed by scaling aggregated outcomes to match the WALY rating scale. The implications of subjective well-being for both patient and society can thus be approached from a broader and richer perspective.

Originality/value

To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study of its kind in pharmaceutical outcomes valuation and marketing. It offers a framework for analyzing life satisfaction and well-being among dry eye patients under treatment. It is also the first to use and adapt a multi-attribute utility measure to treatment outcomes of omega-3s in ocular diseases, from which this study suggests WALYs may be computed. However, it does not suggest that WALYs should supplant QALYs and DALYs in evaluating health outcomes. Medical economics is enriched if alternative methods of outcomes evaluations can help fill in the gaps in existing paradigms and do so by accounting for other effects of condition-specific interventions. Costs and benefits of interventions to the individual and society can then be valued not just more effectively, but also more equitably.

Details

International Journal of Pharmaceutical and Healthcare Marketing, vol. 16 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6123

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 June 2020

Inga Jona Jonsdottir, Gudbjorg Linda Rafnsdottir and Thorhildur Ólafsdóttir

The purpose of this paper is to further the understanding of public sector line managers' work-related well-being and health in relation to job strain, gender and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to further the understanding of public sector line managers' work-related well-being and health in relation to job strain, gender and workplace social support.

Design/methodology/approach

An online survey was sent to all senior and middle line managers (N = 357) in three administrative departments of Iceland's largest municipality. The response rate was 64.7%. Multivariate logistic regression was used to analyse the data.

Findings

A minority of respondents experience high job strain. However, for these managers, the risk of experiencing emotional exhaustion is about fivefold, compared to those not experiencing high job strain. Social support is an important buffering against job strain and enhances well-being. Female managers are more likely than their male counterparts to report myositis, back or shoulder pain and sleeping difficulty.

Practical implications

The study emphasises that workplace social support attenuates the negative impact of job strain on line managers' work-related well-being. Furthermore, it demonstrates that in a society at the forefront in gender equality, gender differences in health symptoms exist among line managers in the public sector – a finding that highlights the importance of studying all aspects of workplace well-being by gender. This calls for future research using a more comprehensive survey data and interviews to shed light on the pathways through which female line managers' health is negatively affected.

Originality/value

Knowledge relating to well-being and health of line managers in the public sector is scarce. This study contributes to filling that gap. As work-related well-being is often gender-blind, the value of the study is also the investigation of the gender patterns in the authors’ data.

Details

International Journal of Workplace Health Management, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8351

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 26 August 2022

Sehrish Ilyas, Ghulam Abid and Fouzia Ashfaq

This study aims to examine the impact of ethical leadership style on the subjective well-being of health-care workers by examining the sequential mediating effects of…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the impact of ethical leadership style on the subjective well-being of health-care workers by examining the sequential mediating effects of perceived organizational support and perceived ethical-philanthropic corporate social responsibility (CSR).

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from frontline health-care workers (i.e. doctors and nurses). Further, to cope with the response burden during the acute wave of the coronavirus pandemic, this study used split-questionnaire design for data collection.

Findings

This study’s findings fully support the hypothesized framework of the study, illustrating that ethical leadership positively influenced the subjective well-being of health-care workers. Moreover, this study found that the ethical leadership and well-being relationship is sequentially mediated by perceived organizational support and perceived ethical-philanthropic CSR.

Practical implications

This study possesses practical implications for health-care institutions to encompass the agenda of developing ethically appropriate conduct in their administration and become genuinely concerned about health-care workers and society as well.

Social implications

By highlighting the role of ethical leadership in participating in ethical and philanthropic CSR activities, this study possesses social implications for the well-being of health-care workers and society at large.

Originality/value

A positive and strong chain of perceptions about organizational support accorded to employees specifically and society at large emerges as an important sequential mediating mechanism that helps ethical leaders in hospital administration in building subjective well-being in their followers amid the COVID-19 pandemic.

Details

International Journal of Ethics and Systems, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9369

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 January 2022

Andrew Cox and Liz Brewster

To discover how UK academic libraries sought to support student mental health and well-being during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Abstract

Purpose

To discover how UK academic libraries sought to support student mental health and well-being during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Design/methodology/approach

The data was from a 24-question survey of UK universities distributed in May 2021 which received 56 responses from 47 different Higher Education Institution libraries. Descriptive statistics are combined with thematic analysis of open text comments.

Findings

Libraries were undertaking a wide range of activities, targeted chiefly at students and broadcast via Twitter, other social media and library web sites. The problem being addressed was the stresses of studying in the context of the pivot online and isolation caused by social distancing. Digital well-being seemed also to be an increased concern. COVID-19 had proved the value of digital support but created a number of challenges such as loss of physical space, communication barriers and lack of extra resource. The role had a somewhat informal place in the organisation. Overall library activities were aligned but not strongly integrated into institutional efforts.

Research limitations/implications

This was a study in one specific national context with a relatively limited number of total responses. There could be a non-response bias where respondents were doing more than was typical in the sector.

Originality/value

The paper is one of the first papers to gather sector wide data and move beyond case studies of what individual libraries due to support to mental health and well-being. It also offers a case study of the impacts of COVID-19 on management pointing to its catalysing the digital shift, creating constraints on resources and communication and prompting the emergence of staff well-being as a consideration in management decision making.

Details

Library Management, vol. 43 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 December 2021

Anupama Singh and Sumi Jha

The purpose of this study is to understand the bi-directional causal relationship (regular and reverse causation) between employee well-being and organizational health

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to understand the bi-directional causal relationship (regular and reverse causation) between employee well-being and organizational health, which is grounded in the micro-foundations of institutional theory.

Design/methodology/approach

In this study, employee well-being has two facets: work engagement and burnout. The positive aspect of employee well-being has been conceptualized by work engagement, whereas the negative aspect has been conceptualized with the help of burnout. As concurrent triangulation method was adopted, the qualitative data, as well as quantitative data, was collected from various laboratories of Council of Scientific and Industrial Research – an Indian research and development organization.

Findings

The findings did not show the existence of a symbiotic relationship between employee well-being and organizational health. The findings indicated the existence of a significant positive relationship between organizational health and employee well-being, but the reverse effect was found to be non-significant. This shows that when organizational health is good, employees’ health will also be good but not vice versa.

Originality/value

This study shows that health is not a static state, and so, at any given point in time, employee well-being cannot have a positive relationship with organizational health. Employee engagement helps enhance organizational health, whereas burnout can hinder organizational health if not properly mitigated.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 54 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1999

Mark Dooris

The University of Central Lancashire's ‘Health Promoting University’ initiative has adopted a ‘settings‐based’ approach to health promotion, aimed at embedding within the…

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Abstract

The University of Central Lancashire's ‘Health Promoting University’ initiative has adopted a ‘settings‐based’ approach to health promotion, aimed at embedding within the organisation an understanding of and commitment to holistic health and to development of its healthpromoting potential. Action to promote mental well‐being is one of the initiative's priority foci, overseen by a multidisciplinary inter‐agency working group. Experience to date suggests that the university is an important setting for the protection, promotion and maintenance of mental well‐being. It also suggests that the Health Promoting University offers a robust theoretical framework that can enable the practical development and implementation of a holistic, comprehensive and integrative approach to promoting mental well‐being. This paper provides an overview of the Health Promoting University initiative, describes work carried out on mental well‐being and explores the challenges and opportunities involved in seeking to use the Health Promoting University framework to promote mental well‐being.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 1 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2005

Anthea Cooke and Tony Coggins

This paper describes the process of developing a mental health and well‐being impact assessment tool in Lewisham, as part of an attempt to increase understanding of mental…

Abstract

This paper describes the process of developing a mental health and well‐being impact assessment tool in Lewisham, as part of an attempt to increase understanding of mental health and well‐being in the context of regeneration programmes. It is presented as a work in progress and the authors would welcome feedback and debate on the complex issues raised when adapting health impact assessment methods to the assessment of mental well‐being.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

Article
Publication date: 8 January 2020

Neha Garg and Pankaj Singh

The purpose of this paper is to examine the role of work engagement as a mediator in the relationship of subjective well-being with work performance, work withdrawal…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the role of work engagement as a mediator in the relationship of subjective well-being with work performance, work withdrawal behavior, physical and mental health.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey design was used to collect the data from 369 Indian software developers. Latent variable structural equation modeling was used to test the hypothesized relationships.

Findings

Subjective well-being was found to have a significant positive association with work engagement and this, in turn, had significantly enhanced employee’s work performance and reduced work withdrawal behavior, mental and physical ill-health. In addition, work engagement was found to fully mediate the association of subjective well-being with work performance and mental ill-health, while it partially mediated the association of subjective well-being with work withdrawal behaviors and physical ill-health.

Practical implications

This paper contributes to the development of self-sustaining approach toward increasing work engagement and provides a way to deal with work-and-health outcomes.

Originality/value

This study is one of the early attempts to examine direct and indirect associations of subjective well-being with work-and-health outcomes in an Indian setting.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. 43 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 April 2017

Marcello Bertotti, Ifeoma Elizabeth Dan-Ogosi and Mala Rao

Workplace well-being is key to improving health and therefore productivity. Although the Chinese population and their influence on business in the UK are growing rapidly…

Abstract

Purpose

Workplace well-being is key to improving health and therefore productivity. Although the Chinese population and their influence on business in the UK are growing rapidly, little is known about the attitudes of Chinese employers and employees towards workplace well-being. The paper aims to discuss this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted a qualitative study to explore the views of Chinese employees and employers in London and interviewed occupational health and workplace well-being experts.

Findings

Employers’ understanding of workplace well-being was limited, their approach was reactive rather than proactive. Contextual factors hampered most efforts towards workplace well-being. Employees reported that working conditions were generally poor with likely implications for employees’ physical and mental health. Generational and migratory changes further complicate the scenario but potentially usher in positive change.

Research limitations/implications

This study was conducted in a London area with a high density of Chinese businesses. The study nevertheless covered only a limited selection of business sectors. Caution may therefore be necessary in assuming the transferability of these findings to other parts of the UK.

Practical implications

Chinese businesses are agreeable to being informed about and considering the business case for workplace well-being. Chinese workers need better working conditions, easier access to health services preferably delivered through Chinese-based networks of community and business associations which are trusted by both employers and employees.

Originality/value

This study offers novel evidence on the attitude of Chinese employers and employees towards workplace well-being by comparing views from both groups. Chinese people face considerable health and mental health problems through their work environment, in contrast with conclusions from the Health Survey for England and Labour Force Survey.

Details

International Journal of Workplace Health Management, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8351

Keywords

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