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Article
Publication date: 20 March 2009

Rodrigo Werlinger, Kirstie Hawkey and Konstantin Beznosov

The purpose of this study is to determine the main challenges that IT security practitioners face in their organizations, including the interplay among human…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to determine the main challenges that IT security practitioners face in their organizations, including the interplay among human, organizational, and technological factors.

Design/methodology/approach

The data set consisted of 36 semi‐structured interviews with IT security practitioners from 17 organizations (academic, government, and private). The interviews were analyzed using qualitative description with constant comparison and inductive analysis of the data to identify the challenges that security practitioners face.

Findings

A total of 18 challenges that can affect IT security management within organizations are indentified and described. This analysis is grounded in related work to build an integrated framework of security challenges. The framework illustrates the interplay among human, organizational, and technological factors.

Practical implications

The framework can help organizations identify potential challenges when implementing security standards, and determine if they are using their security resources effectively to address the challenges. It also provides a way to understand the interplay of the different factors, for example, how the culture of the organization and decentralization of IT security trigger security issues that make security management more difficult. Several opportunities for researchers and developers to improve the technology and processes used to support adoption of security policies and standards within organizations are provided.

Originality/value

A comprehensive list of human, organizational, and technological challenges that security experts have to face within their organizations is presented. In addition, these challenges within a framework that illustrates the interplay between factors and the consequences of this interplay for organizations are integrated.

Details

Information Management & Computer Security, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-5227

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Article
Publication date: 16 February 2021

Johannes von Bloh

Entrepreneurial Ecosystems (EES) is among the fastest growing entrepreneurship research topics. With even greater vigour, the non-scientific world of economic development…

Abstract

Purpose

Entrepreneurial Ecosystems (EES) is among the fastest growing entrepreneurship research topics. With even greater vigour, the non-scientific world of economic development agencies, administrations and policymakers has adopted the construct and applies it widely “in the field”, often lacking a solid empirical foundation and pursuing sub-optimal approaches. Improving policy instruments for EES development requires a data driven approach to first understand an EES of a specific region before making any attempts to change it. The paper showcases an empirical approach to create empirically rooted EES policy implications, contributing to closing the gap for insight in regional EES data of sub-national regions.

Design/methodology/approach

Exploring a mixed method design, utilising quantitative Global Entrepreneurship Monitor data and combining it with EES stakeholder interviews, focusing on dysfunctions, redundancies, power asymmetries and cut off elements as well as in-layer division and public organisation behaviour.

Findings

One finding is, that regional economic development agencies (EDA), as a main public instrument to foster regional entrepreneurial activity, seem to bring the potential of a negative impact on Entrepreneurial Ecosystems bottom-up development and the ability to become self-sustained if they assume the role of competitors towards private organisations and businesses.

Research limitations/implications

As other work on EES, the approach used in this paper only sub-optimally covers temporal system dynamics.

Practical implications

This paper contributes to future EES support policies being rooted in an empirical foundation.

Originality/value

This paper not only progresses the empirical basis for research on regional EES but also lays the foundation for specific policy implications for a sub-national level entrepreneurial ecosystem.

Details

Journal of Entrepreneurship and Public Policy, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2045-2101

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1995

Marilyn E. Barnes

Libraries need to develop information processing systems for evaluation, budgeting, planning, and operations. Electronic spreadsheets lend themselves to a variety of…

Abstract

Libraries need to develop information processing systems for evaluation, budgeting, planning, and operations. Electronic spreadsheets lend themselves to a variety of applications, but are time‐consuming to create. A model template and macros that can be used in many different types of library data analysis have been developed here. The procedures demonstrated here can build an essential set of tools for meeting fundamental goals of administrative efficiency, effective use of library resources, staff motivation, and rational policy making.

Details

The Bottom Line, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0888-045X

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Article
Publication date: 13 October 2021

Sobia Hassan, Nighat Ansari and Ali Rehman

The present research aims to examine the effect of workplace spirituality (WPS) and employee well-being (EWB) on public service motivation (PSM) in the public…

Abstract

Purpose

The present research aims to examine the effect of workplace spirituality (WPS) and employee well-being (EWB) on public service motivation (PSM) in the public institutions. Workplace spirituality and EWB are two concepts related to the optimal level of human performance, while the motivation of academic staff is a vital concern in higher education institutions (HEIs), particularly in the public sector. In this competitive age, it is a challenge to improve the motivation of academic staff due to limited resources in developing countries. This study examines the association between WPS and PSM through the lens of EWB in the context of HEIs.

Design/methodology/approach

This study opted for a quantitative research method by using a stratified sampling technique. A structured questionnaire was used to collect data from the academic staff of renowned public sector universities located in Lahore, Pakistan. Hypothesized relationships were tested using structural equation modeling through AMOS: 22.

Findings

The results supported the established conceptual model that WPS is positively associated with PSM through the mediating role of EWB.

Research limitations/implications

The research approach chosen may lack generalizability of the results because the data were collected from a specific population. Moreover, self-report measures were used, which may have led to common method bias which is also another drawback of the study.

Practical implications

This study is a pioneer in conceptualizing and testing a model that links WPS, EWB and PSM in the context of HEIs. The implications regarding enhancing the culture of spirituality in the workplace, EWB and PSM are elaborated in the specific context of academic staff, attempting to fill a gap in the extant literature.

Originality/value

This study accomplishes a recognized need to study how PSM can be improved by facilitating EWB and WPS.

Details

Journal of Economic and Administrative Sciences, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1026-4116

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2021

Wanglin Ma, Puneet Vatsa, Xiaoshi Zhou and Hongyun Zheng

The purpose of this study is to explore the relationship between farmers' happiness and farm productivity, taking maize production in China as an example.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to explore the relationship between farmers' happiness and farm productivity, taking maize production in China as an example.

Design/methodology/approach

The conditional mixed process model is employed to account for the endogeneity that inevitably arises in regression models studying happiness and estimate the 2015 China Household Finance Survey data.

Findings

The empirical results show that a higher level of farmers' happiness is associated with higher maize productivity. The marginal return in maize productivity changes unevenly with increments in farmers' self-reported happiness on a five-point Likert scale. Farmers' happiness is positively determined by their age, educational level, farm size, machinery ownership, access to agricultural subsidy and car ownership. Machinery ownership and access to credit are two important factors that improve maize productivity.

Research limitations/implications

The finding suggests that promoting the subjective well-being of farmers is conducive to higher productivity and improved national food security. The results have implications for China and other developing countries aiming for sustainable agricultural development.

Originality/value

Firm-level data show that workers' happiness improves productivity. However, it is still unclear whether farmworkers' happiness affects farm productivity. Thus, this study provides the first empirical analysis of the impact of farmworkers' happiness on farm productivity.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 1 March 2021

Ermita Yusida, Vika Annisa Qurrata, Vidya Purnamasari and Wen-Chi Huang

Internet technology and social media especially from mobile social commerce are known to have lavish impacts on the economic development. The purpose of this study was to…

Abstract

Internet technology and social media especially from mobile social commerce are known to have lavish impacts on the economic development. The purpose of this study was to identify the impact of the online market on the level of social welfare of online market traders which is proxies by the level of income. Bulan Terang Utama (BTU) area was used as an object in this study due to the fact that it is a subsidized housing area with a level of middle-income community income. The method used in this study was a quantitative method using the analysis of three-stage least square (3SLS). The results of the 3SLS estimation indicate that there was a significant increase in online seller income with the presence of the BTU online market. This situation happened by the fact that many buyers switch to sellers after they join the BTU Online Market. They began as a buyer and then offered their merchandise through the online market and became a permanent seller in this group. When many residents in these areas are using online markets as their primary place for selling, there will be need for strong connectivity (internet network) in each region to develop current economic activities. Furthermore, the government rule in enhancing technology literacy is also very important especially for the middle to lower regions.

Details

Recent Developments in Asian Economics International Symposia in Economic Theory and Econometrics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-359-8

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Book part
Publication date: 21 November 2014

Esfandiar Maasoumi, Melinda Pitts and Ke Wu

We examine the cardinal gap between wage distributions of the incumbents and newly hired workers based on entropic distances which are well-defined welfare theoretic…

Abstract

We examine the cardinal gap between wage distributions of the incumbents and newly hired workers based on entropic distances which are well-defined welfare theoretic measures. Decomposition of several effects is achieved by identifying several counterfactual distributions of different groups. These go beyond the usual Oaxaca–Blinder decompositions at the (linear) conditional means. Much like quantiles, these entropic distances are well-defined inferential objects and functions whose statistical properties have recently been developed. Going beyond these strong rankings and distances, we consider weak uniform ranking of these wage outcomes based on statistical tests for stochastic dominance. The empirical analysis is focused on employees with at least 35 hours of work in the 1996–2012 monthly Current Population Survey (CPS). Among others, we find incumbent workers enjoy a better distribution of wages, but the attribution of the gap to wage inequality and human capital characteristics varies between quantiles. For instance, highly paid new workers are mainly due to human capital components, and in some years, even better wage structure.

Details

Essays in Honor of Peter C. B. Phillips
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-183-1

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 2 April 2021

An Duong

This study aims to examine the impact of the preferential credit (represented by loan volume and duration) provided by the Vietnam Bank for Social Policies on household…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the impact of the preferential credit (represented by loan volume and duration) provided by the Vietnam Bank for Social Policies on household welfare (represented by household income and consumption) in Ninh Binh province, Vietnam. It also identifies and ranks the barriers of accessing the credit.

Design/methodology/approach

The study applies fixed-effects method to handle the panel data to examine the impact of the credit on poverty reduction. It also uses face-to-face interviews and group discussions to identify and rank the barriers of accessing to the credit.

Findings

The results show that the loan volume significantly helps improve household income, but does not help improve household consumption. For example, a 1% increase in the loan volume is associated with an increase of almost 0.69% in household income, significant at the 1% level. In addition, the loan duration does not help improve household welfare. The major barriers of accessing the credit include the time spent to get to the nearest bank branch and the transparency of household poverty status assessment.

Research limitations/implications

Data are collected in three years, the number of the sample limits at 300 households. A few variables are not included in the models due to resource limitation for data collection or the nature of the study method.

Practical implications

The Vietnam Bank for Social Policies preferential credit may need to increase the loan volume to significantly help improve household welfare, hence reduce poverty. In addition, barriers of accessing the credit such as bank coverage and the household poverty status assessment should be eliminated so that more households, including poor ones, can have a better access.

Social implications

The Vietnam Bank for Social Policies preferential credit can help to improve household welfare, hence ease household poverty status. To help the credit reach more people, accessing barriers such as bank coverage and the household poverty status assessment should be eliminated.

Originality/value

This is the first study that has examined the impact of the Vietnam Bank for Social Policies preferential credit on household welfare and identified barriers of accessing the credit. The quantitative analysis uses a panel data set constructed from 300 face-to-face interviews with households located in one city and two districts in Ninh Binh province during 2016–2018 and applied the fixed-effects method to examine the impact of the credit on household welfare. The qualitative analysis uses in-depth interviews and group discussion with key persons and related parties to identify barriers of accessing the credit.

Details

Journal of Economics and Development, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1859-0020

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Book part
Publication date: 26 August 2015

Andrew E. Clark, Conchita D’Ambrosio and Simone Ghislandi

We consider the link between poverty and subjective well-being, and focus in particular on the role of time. We use panel data on 49,000 individuals living in Germany from…

Abstract

We consider the link between poverty and subjective well-being, and focus in particular on the role of time. We use panel data on 49,000 individuals living in Germany from 1992 to 2012 to uncover three empirical relationships. First, life satisfaction falls with both the incidence and intensity of contemporaneous poverty. Second, poverty scars: those who have been poor in the past report lower life satisfaction today, even when out of poverty. Last, the order of poverty spells matters: for a given number of years in poverty, satisfaction is lower when the years are linked together. As such, poverty persistence reduces well-being. These effects differ by population subgroups.

Details

Measurement of Poverty, Deprivation, and Economic Mobility
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-386-0

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Book part
Publication date: 26 August 2019

Kim Abildgren

Empirical studies on household-level inflation inequality have so far only focused on periods with positive inflation rates. However, the major concern on the policy…

Abstract

Empirical studies on household-level inflation inequality have so far only focused on periods with positive inflation rates. However, the major concern on the policy agenda since the most recent financial crisis has been deflation rather than inflation. This naturally raises the question regarding the effect of deflation on the distribution of real income when households spend their budget on different consumption bundles. This chapter compiles annual household-level inflation rates in Denmark from 1930 to 1935 based on microdata from the Expenditure and Saving Survey of 1931 and price data from the official Retail Price Index. The results indicate that lower-income households faced a larger decline in prices on their consumption of goods and services during the deflation years 1930–1932 than higher-income households did. The deflation thus contributed to narrowing the difference in real incomes between the top and bottom parts of the income distribution during the recession. In the years 1933–1935 with positive inflation rates, the lower-income households experienced higher inflation rates than higher-income households. Over the period 1930–1935 seen as a whole, the price development contributed slightly to reducing real income inequality. The low degree of medium-term persistence of differences in household-specific inflation rates is consistent with previous findings in various time periods from the 1960s to the 2000s without any persistent deflation events. The chapter at hand is the first empirical study of the direct distributional effects of price developments at the household level in a period with persistent deflation.

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