Search results

1 – 10 of over 158000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 23 September 2021

Aravindi Samarakkody and B.A.K.S. Perera

Like in many other countries, in Sri Lanka, minimal attention is paid to the performance of a building after it has been taken over by its end-user. Hence, a gap often…

Abstract

Purpose

Like in many other countries, in Sri Lanka, minimal attention is paid to the performance of a building after it has been taken over by its end-user. Hence, a gap often exists between the actual performance of the building and its predicted performance. This performance gap led to the origin of the Soft Landings (SL) framework by Building Services Research Information Association (BSRIA). The applications of SL have been studied only in contexts like Australia, New Zealand and the United Kingdom, although optimal building performance is being discussed extensively all over the world. Thus, this paper aims to determine the possibility of applying SL to building construction projects in Sri Lanka.

Design/methodology/approach

Two rounds of expert interviews were conducted to collect data; they were analyzed using content analysis and later validated using pattern matching.

Findings

At a glance, the application of SL is welcoming as the performance gap in Sri Lankan buildings is significant. However, the existing practices encumber the application of certain aspects like three years post-construction aftercare. The actual application to the Sri Lankan context requires a modification to the periods specified for the SL stages in theory.

Originality/value

Adaptability of the SL framework has not been systematically researched in the context of a developing country yet. The enablers and barriers in the application of SL and the level of effort required in its implementation too have not been studied before. The research addressed this literature gap as well as the industry need.

Details

Smart and Sustainable Built Environment, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6099

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 24 August 2021

Kofi Agyekum, Elorm Emil Koku Akli-Nartey, Augustine Senanu Kukah and Amma Kyewaa Agyekum

The excellence in design and greater efficiencies (EDGE) certification system has seen a gradual adoption worldwide, with Ghana having six out of its eight certified green…

Abstract

Purpose

The excellence in design and greater efficiencies (EDGE) certification system has seen a gradual adoption worldwide, with Ghana having six out of its eight certified green buildings bearing an EDGE certification. However, little is known about occupants’ satisfaction with the indoor environmental quality (IEQ) of EDGE-certified buildings. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to examine the satisfaction of occupants with the IEQ of an EDGE-certified building in Ghana by identifying their perceived performance of the indoor environment relative to their perceived importance.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was conducted to evaluate the performance of 12 IEQ parameters with the occupants of an EDGE-certified office building. The survey results were evaluated using a gap analysis and both traditional and alternative Importance-Performance Analysis (IPA) matrices.

Findings

The findings revealed that noise level, temperature, cleanliness, sound privacy, air quality and humidity were IEQs that required the highest priority for improvement. Daylight and artificial lighting showed no appreciable performance gap. Space layout was adequately satisfied, whereas space size was overly satisfied. Visual privacy and outdoor view were found to require low priority of improvement.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the state-of-the-art of the IEQ of green buildings. It pioneers the research that seeks to examine the IEQ of EDGE-certified buildings. The gap analysis and the IPA were effective in prioritizing the IEQs for improvement action and provided a practical research framework that helped researchers examine the performance of green buildings, thereby giving valuable feedback to policymakers and building owners.

Details

International Journal of Building Pathology and Adaptation, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-4708

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 22 March 2021

Ayman Ahmed Ezzat Othman and Fatma Othman Alamoudy

This paper aims to develop a framework for optimising building performance through the integration between risk management (RM) and building information modelling (BIM…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to develop a framework for optimising building performance through the integration between risk management (RM) and building information modelling (BIM) during the design process.

Design/methodology/approach

To achieve this aim, a research strategy consisting of literature review, case studies and survey questionnaire is designed to accomplish four objectives. First, to examine the concepts of design process, building performance, RM and BIM; second, to present three case studies to explain the role of using RM and BIM capabilities towards optimising building performance; third, to investigate the perception and application of architectural design firms in Egypt towards the role of RM and BIM for enhancing building performance during the design process; and finally, to develop a framework integrating RM and BIM during the design process as an approach for optimising building performance.

Findings

Through literature review, the research identified 18 risks that hamper optimising building performance during the design process. In addition, 11 building performance values and 20 BIM technologies were defined. Results of data analysis showed that “Design budget overrun”, “Lack of considering life cycle cost” and “Inefficient use of the design time” were ranked the highest risks that affect the optimisation of building performance. Respondents ranked “Risk avoid” or “Risk transfer” as the most risk responses adopted in the Egyptian context. In addition, “BIM As Built” was ranked the highest BIM technology used for overcoming risks during the design process. These findings necessitated taking action towards developing a framework to optimising building performance.

Originality/value

The research identified the risks that affect optimising building performance during the design process. It focuses on improving the design process through using the capabilities of BIM technologies towards overcoming these risks during the design process. The proposed framework which integrates RM and BIM represents a synthesis that is novel and creative in thought and adds value to the knowledge in a manner that has not previously occurred.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology , vol. 19 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 December 1994

James Douglas

Over the past few years there has been a significant upsurge of interestin building performance and its appraisal. As the expectations andstandards of property users…

Downloads
1686

Abstract

Over the past few years there has been a significant upsurge of interest in building performance and its appraisal. As the expectations and standards of property users increase, appraisers of buildings have had to develop improved evaluation methods. Building surveyors, as key technical appraisal specialists in construction, have a contribution to make in this growing field. A great deal of the extant research on building performance has been at the “micro‐level” where either individual building elements or aspects of a building′s internal environment have been critically evaluated. Such work can highlight component failures and cryptoclimate problems, but it does little to enlarge our understanding of how buildings perform overall. Discusses some of the current issues assessing the total performance of buildings. Refines the model labelled property efficiency appraisal (PEA) for evaluating the total performance of existing buildings. Considers the key factors and influences for a “macro‐level” assessment of the total performance of existing buildings and points the way ahead.

Details

Structural Survey, vol. 12 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-080X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 12 April 2013

Isabelina Nahmens and Claudette Reichel

The purpose of this paper is to explore the adoption process of high performance building technologies, including alternative wall systems, in hot‐humid climates…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the adoption process of high performance building technologies, including alternative wall systems, in hot‐humid climates. Challenges faced by homebuilders adopting high performance building technologies, and resulting energy performance are discussed.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is a case study of four homebuilders using high performance building technologies, including advanced framing, panelised and modular. For each homebuilder, a baseline and a demonstration house were evaluated for energy performance and technology adoption. Homebuilders were interviewed to identify implementation challenges and barriers faced during the construction process.

Findings

The advanced framing, modular and panelised houses used 50 percent, 42 percent, and 35 percent less energy when compared to the traditional stick‐built. Further, the modular appeared to have the greatest opportunity to boost performance for least cost. Participating builders identified cost as the top constraint to a wide adoption of high performance criteria, followed by a slow learning curve and the lack of proper marketing channels to transition from construction to sale.

Research limitations/implications

Several limitations of the research restrict generalisation of findings: results are based on a small sample of homebuilders; and results reflect energy performance in a hot and humid climate. It is likely that relative energy usage will change as the size, scope, and design complexity of the common element changes.

Originality/value

Findings from this study will contribute to a better understanding of the usability of high performance technologies and ease the transition towards implementing high performance criteria into every builder company's culture.

Details

Construction Innovation, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-4175

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 18 September 2019

Rajat Gupta, Matthew Gregg and Rohini Cherian

The field of building performance evaluation (BPE) forms a fragmented whole with tools and methods that are not widely applicable. In response, the purpose of this paper…

Abstract

Purpose

The field of building performance evaluation (BPE) forms a fragmented whole with tools and methods that are not widely applicable. In response, the purpose of this paper is to develop and demonstrate a novel BPE framework to bring consistency and flexibility in evaluating actual building performance.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper critically reviews and evaluates existing BPE methods and techniques and situates them in different building life stages. Using a hierarchical approach, a “BPE framework” is devised for new and existing buildings as well as refurbishments. The working of the BPE framework is demonstrated by applying it to four discreet BPE studies to enable cross-comparison of different BPE approaches based on their stage of application, depth and duration of BPE investigations.

Findings

The framework is designed to have four graduated levels starting at the “basic” level and developing incrementally to “core”, “comprehensive” and “advanced” levels, thereby focussing on “need to know” rather than “nice to have”. The framework also offers a mechanism to map different types of BPE studies with varying scope and content.

Practical implications

As we enter a world of smart meters and smart buildings, we are transitioning into a new future of understanding building performance. The study helps to better understand which BPE method can be used to study what aspect of building performance and in what building lifecycle stage, against time, cost and user expertise.

Originality/value

The graduated and flexible framework helps to bring consistency in evaluating building performance in an otherwise fragmented field, to help improve building performance.

Details

International Journal of Building Pathology and Adaptation, vol. 38 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-4708

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 4 April 2008

Low Sui Pheng, Liu Jun Ying and Wong Heng Lock

The purpose of this paper is to show that, while the buildability concept and habitation comfort have been studied extensively, these have so far been examined separately…

Downloads
1628

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to show that, while the buildability concept and habitation comfort have been studied extensively, these have so far been examined separately. In particular, the implications, which the Total Building Performance (TBP) concept may have on buildability, are as yet unknown. Arising from this lacuna, the objective of this study is to develop an understanding of the relationship between buildability and the two TBP mandates of Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) and visual performance (VP).

Design/methodology/approach

In studying the relationship between the IAQ and VP mandates and buildability, a base model was used to establish the baseline for comparison. This base model was adopted from the Code of Practice on Buildable Design implemented by the Building and Construction Authority in Singapore. The incorporation of IAQ and visual performance guidelines on the base model was examined to assess their influence on the buildability score.

Findings

Analysis for the IAQ component yielded a slight increase in the buildability score after the incorporation of the guidelines. However, this was not the case in the visual performance component, where there was a slight decrease in the buildability score. Nevertheless, the reduction does not affect the buildability score significantly. The minimum buildability score requirements set by the Building and Construction Authority in Singapore were still met after the incorporation of the guidelines. This seems to suggest that there is minimum effect on the buildability score arising from the implementation of both the IAQ and visual performance mandates.

Practical implications

The study determined that the two TBP mandates of IAQ and visual performance do not have any significantly adverse effect on buildability. Building professionals can therefore incorporate appropriate IAQ and visual performance guidelines in their architectural layout designs without compromising on buildability.

Originality/value

This study presents a better understanding of the relationship between buildability and the two TBP mandates of IAQ and visual performance.

Details

Structural Survey, vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-080X

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 3 October 2017

Tristan Gerrish, Kirti Ruikar, Malcolm Cook, Mark Johnson and Mark Phillip

The aim of this paper is to demonstrate the use of historical building performance data to identify potential issues with the build quality and operation of a building, as…

Downloads
2248

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to demonstrate the use of historical building performance data to identify potential issues with the build quality and operation of a building, as a means of narrowing the scope of in-depth further review.

Design/methodology/approach

The response of a room to the difference between internal and external temperatures is used to demonstrate patterns in thermal response across monitored rooms in a single building, to clearly show where rooms are under-performing in terms of their ability to retain heat during unconditioned hours. This procedure is applied to three buildings of different types, identifying the scope and limitation of this method and indicating areas of building performance deficiency.

Findings

The response of a single space to changing internal and external temperatures can be used to determine whether it responds differently to other monitored buildings. Spaces where thermal bridging and changes in use from design were encountered exhibit noticeably different responses.

Research limitations/implications

Application of this methodology is limited to buildings where temperature monitoring is undertaken both internally for a variety of spaces, and externally, and where knowledge of the uses of monitored spaces is available. Naturally ventilated buildings would be more suitable for analysis using this method.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the understanding of building energy performance from a data-driven perspective, to the knowledge on the disparity between building design intent and reality, and to the use of basic commonly recorded performance metrics for analysis of potentially detrimental building performance issues.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 8 July 2014

Olivia Guerra-Santin, Aidan Christopher Tweed and Maria Gabriela Zapata-Lancaster

The purpose of this paper is to determine the usability of design reviews to inform designers about low carbon technologies and building performance. The design review of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to determine the usability of design reviews to inform designers about low carbon technologies and building performance. The design review of three domestic and two non-domestic case studies are evaluated.

Design/methodology/approach

Data collection and analysis methods include interviews and meetings with design teams and contractors, design tools audit and revision of drawings and project documentation. In addition, building's envelope and systems, and in-use performance evaluations are used to inform design teams about the actual performance of the buildings.

Findings

This study showed that targets and intentions defined in the design process are not always compatible or reality checked. These contradictions between targets within a project can undermine the performance of a building. The design review can identify unrealistic expectations to assess fairly the performance of buildings. The study showed that changes made during construction to the original design are related to lack of specifications or experience with low carbon technologies. Design reviews can help designers to identify the knowledge gaps within their practice. Furthermore, the results showed that building-related energy consumption was close to expectations, while user-related consumption was higher than expected due to occupancy assumptions made during the design. The design review showed that designers require more knowledge about buildings’ in-use performance in order to take informed-based design decisions.

Originality/value

This paper showed the main stages of a design review, and their usability to assess building performance and to inform designers. The results of this study suggest that designs can benefit from design reviews by learning about low carbon technologies installation and building's operation.

Details

Structural Survey, vol. 32 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-080X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 April 2002

Gavin McDougall, John R. Kelly, John Hinks and Umit S. Bititci

With the purpose of creating a forum for discussion on the scope and nature of building performance evaluation. This paper provides a definition of performance measurement…

Downloads
1621

Abstract

With the purpose of creating a forum for discussion on the scope and nature of building performance evaluation. This paper provides a definition of performance measurement from an organisational perspective, and a review of three leading industry tools for post‐occupancy evaluation that examines the gap between evaluation and measurement. The paper concludes by asking what role facilities managers might play in building performance appraisal, what barriers cost imposes on measurement of the built infrastructure, and what are the limitations regarding the methods included in the review.

Details

Journal of Facilities Management, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-5967

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 158000