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Article
Publication date: 30 September 2014

Gyles Glover, Anna Christie and Chris Hatton

The purpose of this paper is to present information from the Joint Health and Social Care Self-Assessment Framework (JHSCSAF) on reported rates of cervical cancer, breast…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present information from the Joint Health and Social Care Self-Assessment Framework (JHSCSAF) on reported rates of cervical cancer, breast cancer and bowel cancer screening for eligible people with learning disabilities in England in 2012/2013 compared to screening rates for the general population.

Design/methodology/approach

Between 94 and 101 Learning Disability Partnership Boards, as part of the JHSCSAF, provided information to allow the calculation of rates of cervical cancer, breast cancer and bowel cancer screening in their locality, for eligible people with learning disabilities and for the population as a whole.

Findings

At a national level, reported cancer screening coverage for eligible people with learning disabilities was substantially lower than for the population as a whole (cervical cancer screening 27.6 per cent of people with learning disabilities vs 70 per cent of total population; breast cancer screening 36.8 per cent of people with learning disabilities vs 57.8 per cent of total population; bowel cancer screening 28.1 per cent of people with learning disabilities vs 40.5 per cent of the general population). There were considerable geographical variations in reported coverage for all three screening programmes.

Originality/value

Consistent with previous research, localities in England report cancer screening rates for eligible people with learning disabilities considerably below those of the general population. There is an urgent need to address data availability and quality issues, as well as reasonable adjustments to cancer screening programmes to ensure uniformly high rates of cancer screening for people with learning disabilities across England.

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2006

Brenda Leese, Phil Heywood, Victoria Allgar, Reg Walker, Aamra Darr and Ikhlaq Din

Primary care cancer lead clinicians (PCCLs) act strategically in primary care trusts (PCTs) in England to improve communication and understanding of cancer across primary…

507

Abstract

Purpose

Primary care cancer lead clinicians (PCCLs) act strategically in primary care trusts (PCTs) in England to improve communication and understanding of cancer across primary and secondary care and provide a link between Cancer Networks and primary care. The aim is to evaluate the first three years of the initiative.

Design/methodology/approach

A postal questionnaire was sent to all PCT chief executives in all PCTs in England and some were passed on to other PCT managers for completion. The response rate was 61 per cent. PCT directors of public health were the largest group of respondents (29 per cent). Most (74 per cent) PCCLs were GPs and 22 per cent were nurses.

Findings

PCCLs were most likely to focus on palliative care and preventive services. Key achievements were identified as raising awareness of cancer, developing relationships and promoting primary care. The personal skills of the PCCLs were important as was support of colleagues at all levels. Lack of time was a major barrier to achievement, as was a lack of understanding of the role from others. Links with the Cancer Networks were being developed. About 85 per cent of managers wanted the role to continue.

Originality/value

The paper illustrates that PCCLs are at the forefront of improving cancer services in primary care. They are particularly important in view of the priority of reducing premature deaths and promotion of healthy lifestyles.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1986

Willa J. Thomas

To gain a better understanding of the importance of the control of cancer, one must first know and understand certain basic facts about the disease. Cancer is the…

Abstract

To gain a better understanding of the importance of the control of cancer, one must first know and understand certain basic facts about the disease. Cancer is the uncontrolled growth of malignant cells. Cancer detection tests determine whether neoplasms (new, abnormal cells) are benign (non‐cancerous) units, or malignant, health‐threatening growths. Of the hundreds of known cancers, there are four types principally affecting humans: sarcoma, cancer of connective tissue and muscles; carcinoma, cancer of lining tissues; leukemia, cancer of blood‐forming tissue; and lymphoma, cancer of lymphatic tissue. Detailed scientific and medical information on cancer can be found in texts written by authorities such as Ruddon (1981).

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Article
Publication date: 24 July 2019

Marianne Cirone

The purpose of this paper is to provide suggestions regarding how cancer resource center directors, staff and volunteers may encourage men battling cancer, as well as male…

201

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide suggestions regarding how cancer resource center directors, staff and volunteers may encourage men battling cancer, as well as male cancer survivors, to patronize cancer resource centers and to participate in center services.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper provides a personal viewpoint based on research and on the author’s managerial experiences with cancer resource center services, including planning services and programming.

Findings

This paper offers cancer resource center directors suggestions regarding how they can attract male cancer patients to their organizations and encourage their participation in center services.

Research limitations/implications

No limitations were identified.

Practical implications

This paper provides possible strategies for overcoming barriers to access to cancer resource centers in the male cancer-survivor population.

Social implications

Given the medical costs associated with cancer care, encouraging men with cancer to actively participate in cancer resource center programming, which profoundly influences their physical, mental, social and spiritual well-being, can yield many societal benefits.

Originality/value

Cancer resource centers desire to be inclusive of all cancer patients, regardless of gender; however, these centers tend to be disproportionally patronized by women with cancer. This viewpoint addresses how this problem may be addressed via service enhancement, service programming and service design to encourage greater usage by men.

Article
Publication date: 1 May 2002

King Kam and Brian H. Kleiner

Worldwide, there are over six million new cancer cases and more than four million cancer deaths each year. Today, millions of people in the workforce have a history of…

242

Abstract

Worldwide, there are over six million new cancer cases and more than four million cancer deaths each year. Today, millions of people in the workforce have a history of cancer. Therefore, employers are seeing incidents of cancer among their employees. Many cancer survivors experience discrimination because of their cancer history. How to protect employees with cancer and what are their legal rights become very important to both employees and employers.

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 23 March 2012

Emmanuel Ehiwe, Paula McGee, Mike Filby and Kate Thomson

Cancer discussion is perceived as a taboo subject among different cultures and societies including Africans. This perception has caused limited knowledge about the disease…

285

Abstract

Purpose

Cancer discussion is perceived as a taboo subject among different cultures and societies including Africans. This perception has caused limited knowledge about the disease and prevented some from seeking early diagnosis and treatment. With West Africans now living in western societies where cancer is openly discussed, this study aims to explore how black Africans perceive the disease and the implications for healthcare.

Design/methodology/approach

Five focus groups of 53 persons from Ghanaian and Nigerian migrant communities in Luton participated in this study.

Findings

Perceptions of fear, shame and denial were identified as key elements of how people perceive and react to cancer among the study population.

Originality/value

Secrecy and apprehension were identified as major barriers and have prevented some from adequately accessing and utilizing cancer facilities in the country. The feelings of fear, secrecy and stigma associated with the disease across different ethnic groups, cultures and nations also exist among the study population. These outcomes are similar and chime with published findings of limited cancer perception research among other ethnic groups and races here in the UK and across the globe.

Details

Ethnicity and Inequalities in Health and Social Care, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0980

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2006

Becky Chandler

This paper provides an overview on the links among diet, obesity and cancer prevention. It also highlights a study which confirms that following specific diet and health…

4237

Abstract

Purpose

This paper provides an overview on the links among diet, obesity and cancer prevention. It also highlights a study which confirms that following specific diet and health recommendations can help prevent cancer.

Design/methodology/approach

Literature searches were conducted to find the most up‐to‐date and relevant literature on diet, obesity and cancer to be included in this paper.

Findings

The World Cancer Report predicts that worldwide new cases of cancer will increase by 50 per cent by 2020 and will present a huge challenge for health and cancer support services. However, it is estimated that eating healthily, staying physically active and maintaining a healthy body weight could reduce cancer risk by 30–40 per cent. Evidence suggests that a plant‐based diet including fibre rich foods and a wide range of vitamins and minerals may offer cancer protection, while obesity and low levels of physical activity may increase cancer risk. In 1997 World Cancer Research Fund (WCRF) and the American Institute of Cancer Research (AICR) produced a pioneering international report: Food Nutrition and the Prevention of Cancer: A Global Perspective. The report drew attention to several links between diet and cancer prevention, and made diet and health recommendations to guide health policy and help reduce cancer risk. Adhering to these guidelines has now been shown to predict risk of and mortality from cancer. WCRF/AICR are compiling a second report which will systematically review published research on food, nutrition (including obesity), physical activity and cancer prevention. Also included will be the new and emerging area of nutrition and lifestyle factors for cancer survivors.

Originality/value

Information is presented to give non‐experts a general, up‐to‐date overview on the links between diet, obesity and cancer prevention.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 36 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 2000

Wynnie Chan

Outlines the main proven dietary links for various forms of cancer – breast, colorectal, lung, prostate, bladder, gastric, cervical and ovarian, endometrial, pancreatic…

1521

Abstract

Outlines the main proven dietary links for various forms of cancer – breast, colorectal, lung, prostate, bladder, gastric, cervical and ovarian, endometrial, pancreatic, oesophageal, laryngeal, oral and pharyngeal, testicular and melanoma. Provides some practical dietary advice in line with the UK Government’s recommendations.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 30 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 4 October 2012

Marit Kristine Ådland and Marianne Lykke

Purpose – The purpose of this chapter is to explore whether and how social tagging can be useful in an information web site for cancer patients and their relatives.…

Abstract

Purpose – The purpose of this chapter is to explore whether and how social tagging can be useful in an information web site for cancer patients and their relatives.

Methodology/approach – Three studies have been carried out in order to investigate the research questions. First, we reviewed and analyzed literature about cancer patients’ information needs and seeking behavior, and about social tagging and patient terminology. Second, we analyzed tags applied to blog postings at Blogomkraeft.dk, a blog site at the Danish information web site Cancer.dk. The tags were compared with the formal browsing structure of Cancer.dk. Results from the two studies were used to develop a prototype for social tagging at Cancer.dk. Thus third, we evaluated the prototype in a usability study.

Findings – We found that tags have the potential to describe and provide access to web site content from the users’ perspective and language use. Social tags may be a means to bridge between scientific viewpoints and terminology and everyday problems and vocabulary. Tags at Blogomkraeft.dk are mainly factual, often detailed, and do not cover as many functions as tags in more general bookmarking systems. An important finding is that some tags seemed to add to and supplement the content instead of factually describing the content of a blog posting. The usability test showed that our test persons liked the tagging feature.

Social implications – Tagging features give the public an opportunity to apply their own terms to documents, reflecting their own model of the current topic. Tags may furthermore function as colloquial lead-in terms from users’ search formulations at search engines such as Google to the domain-specific, tailored cancer web site.

Originality/value – Unlike most research on social tagging so far, we investigate tagging in a domain-specific setting, how tags can improve the interaction and communication between layman users and domain experts in an information web site within health care.

Details

Social Information Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-833-5

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 24 July 2012

Lauren D. Arnold and Vetta L. Sanders Thompson

Purpose – To provide an overview of racial/ethnic disparities in human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, HPV vaccination, and cervical cancer on domestic and international…

Abstract

Purpose – To provide an overview of racial/ethnic disparities in human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, HPV vaccination, and cervical cancer on domestic and international levels.

Design/methodology/approach – The literature, cervical cancer prevention guidelines, and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention resources were culled to aggregate information on epidemiology, racial/ethnic disparities, and knowledge and attitudes related to HPV, HPV vaccination, and cervical cancer. Original data supplement information about HPV and HPV vaccination knowledge and attitudes.

Findings – Cervical cancer is among the leading causes of female death worldwide, with substantial racial/ethnic and geographic disparities. In the United States, African American and Hispanic women suffer disproportionate cervical cancer incidence and mortality compared to their Caucasian counterparts. Globally, the greatest burden of cervical cancer (and HPV infection) is shouldered by developing regions. Prevention efforts, such as HPV vaccination and adaption of screening programs to resource-poor areas, have the potential to reduce such disparities, but cultural context is critical to successful development and implementation of such interventions.

Research limitations/implications – As this is not a systematic review, but rather a viewpoint on issues related to disparities in cervical cancer, the literature review is not exhaustive.

Practical implications – This chapter provides a context for examining cervical cancer disparities domestically and globally and serves as a starting point for formulating future research.

Originality – This perspective on HPV and cervical cancer presents disparities both within the United States and worldwide. The chapter supplements the literature with new data that provide additional insight into knowledge and attitudes about these health issues.

Details

Health Disparities Among Under-served Populations: Implications for Research, Policy and Praxis
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-103-8

Keywords

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