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Book part

Sherwood Thompson

Diversity is a somewhat amorphous concept; however, it is crucial to our growth as a nation, especially the growth and personal development of college and university…

Abstract

Diversity is a somewhat amorphous concept; however, it is crucial to our growth as a nation, especially the growth and personal development of college and university students. Most college and university campuses are diverse societies, composed of individuals of many ethnicities, religions, ages, sexual identities, and physical abilities. It is not hard to see the diversity on a campus; people of different backgrounds and cultures comprise the vast majority of the campus population. The University Diversity and Inclusion Office commonly has a vice president, an associate provost, or chief diversity officer for diversity who serves as the senior administrative head. This leader has the responsibility to provide educational activities and programs systematically.

This chapter discusses the role that the University Diversity and Inclusion Office plays in educating the campus about global diversity awareness and inclusivity excellence. The chapter outlines a systematic and flexible approach to addressing the demographic shift that is occurring on college and university campuses and how best to deal with campus bias incidents. The components of the University Diversity and Inclusion Office strategic direction are examined with particular attention focused on the role of the office, its leadership, and the mission of the institution. A section on proposed successful campus-wide diversity initiatives is included as examples of an essential endeavor that enhances campus diversity. This organizational structure has won a national (HEED) Higher Education Excellent in Diversity Award.

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Article

Spencer Lessans, Kristijan Bogdanovski, Katherine R. Porter, Katie Ballantyne and Magdalena Pasarica

As the need for effective physician leaders caring for underserved populations grows, it is important to initiate interventions for medical professionals early in their…

Abstract

Purpose

As the need for effective physician leaders caring for underserved populations grows, it is important to initiate interventions for medical professionals early in their education. Board experience on a student-run free clinic serving vulnerable populations within the community has the potential to educate medical students in a hands-on environment. This paper aims to determine if serving as a leader of a student-run free clinic impacts leadership skills and future leadership goals of medical students.

Design/methodology/approach

Medical students leading a student-run free clinic completed an anonymous electronic survey to determine how this experience affected their teamwork skills, interprofessional leadership skills and future leadership career goals. The survey consisted of 12 items to which students responded with how closely they agreed via a five-point Likert scale with 1 = strongly disagree and 5 = strongly agree. Descriptive statistics are reported.

Findings

From the 46 students (42.2% response rate) responding to the survey, 95.45% had a previous leadership experience and 89.2% expressed previous interest in a leadership position. Students scored on average 4.36 (out of 5) for improvement in teamwork skills, 4.34 (out of 5) for improvement in interprofessional skills and 3.88 (out of 5) for impact on future leadership career goals.

Originality/value

This study suggests that service on a student-run free clinic improves teamwork and interprofessional leadership skills as well as future leadership plans of medical students in an underserved vulnerable population environment. Other institutions could use student-run free clinics for early development of effective leaders in medical health care for the vulnerable population.

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1879

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Article

Jill Barr-Walker

The purpose of this paper is to assess the involvement of libraries in health literacy programs and initiatives based on a review of the literature.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess the involvement of libraries in health literacy programs and initiatives based on a review of the literature.

Design/methodology/approach

Four databases were searched for papers that described health literacy programs and initiatives within libraries.

Findings

Several themes of health literacy programs in libraries emerged: health literacy for older adults, underserved populations, the general public, healthcare professionals, and medical students, and patients. Collaborations between libraries and community organizations were frequently used.

Practical implications

Librarians may use this review to understand the history of health literacy efforts and libraries to inform future programming. This review will contextualize current research on health literacy and libraries.

Originality/value

Despite the currency and relevance of this topic, there are no literature reviews on health literacy and librarianship.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 44 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article

Michael H. Slotkin, Christopher J. Durie and Jarin R. Eisenberg

The purpose of this paper is to highlight the role blended learning plays in expanding study abroad opportunities.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to highlight the role blended learning plays in expanding study abroad opportunities.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach utilized involves providing a synopsis of research dealing with study abroad and its benefits, particularly for student populations likely to comprise a significant portion of the distance learning market. Perspectives on the benefits derived from incorporating distance learning into short‐term study abroad programs are then discussed based on the experiences of a business college with a significant enrollment of online students.

Findings

This paper highlights the flexibility afforded by online education in fulfilling academic content requirements, showcasing blended learning as a strategic complementary input in content delivery. The enhancement in study abroad options afforded offers the potential to introduce international business experiences to student populations historically underserved.

Practical implications

Blended learning facilitates the inclusion of online students, enhancing the financial viability of study abroad courses and programs.

Social implications

Blended learning facilitates the inclusion of online students, expanding study abroad opportunities to student populations historically underserved.

Originality/value

Conceptualizing blended learning as a facilitating device for study abroad is a contribution to the literature; research surrounding the nexus between online learning and study abroad is embryonic. Within this nascent area, this paper also provides value in offering suggestions for future empirical research.

Details

Journal of International Education in Business, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-469X

Keywords

Content available
Book part

Angela W. Peters, Verlie A. Tisdale and Derrick J. Swinton

Findings within the last decade reveal a core set of activities that have been correlated to student success metrics such as persistence, retention, and graduation (Kuh…

Abstract

Findings within the last decade reveal a core set of activities that have been correlated to student success metrics such as persistence, retention, and graduation (Kuh, 2008). These research-based activities are called high-impact practices (HIPs). Students who have participated in HIPs have shown gains in retention, in persistence, intellectually and in an overall positive college experience. This chapter provides an overview of 10 HIPs and their importance and benefits to underserved students, that is, first-generation college students, low-income college students, and underrepresented students of color such as African American, Latino/a, and Native American. Findings within the chapter also recognize how HIPs can be extremely beneficial for historically Black colleges and universities to build capacity and to ensure student success, particularly in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM).

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Case study

Hristina Kostadinova Dzharova, Sudheer Gupta and Jai Ganesh

The case features WaterHealth International India (WHIN) – a subsidiary of WaterHealth International (WHI) Inc. WHIN was launched in 2006 with the vision to “be the leader…

Abstract

Synopsis

The case features WaterHealth International India (WHIN) – a subsidiary of WaterHealth International (WHI) Inc. WHIN was launched in 2006 with the vision to “be the leader in providing scalable, safe, and affordable water solutions to underserved populations through an innovative business model.” The company incorporated a Build-Operate-Transfer model with decentralized production and distribution. Following a successful pilot project, WHIN installed its WaterHealth Centers in 175 sites throughout rural India by 2009, and attracted a $15 million investment from the International Finance Corporation to further expand its operations in India. Mr Vikas Shah, the Chief Operating Officer of the company, is faced with the issue of assessing scalability and sustainability of the company's business model. He needs to examine and evaluate the company's value proposition, resources and capabilities, and decide how to generate economic value while maintaining a focus on its social vision. The latter entails an ability to create shared value for stakeholders as an important contributor toward the company's sustainability. Additionally, Mr Shah is evaluating alternative public-private partnerships in terms of their suitability for the Indian context and viability to drive profitability.

Research methodology

The case uses primary and secondary data, i.e. interviews with company representatives, company reports, presentations, and consulting papers.

Relevant courses and levels

The case is written for graduate (and advanced undergraduate) students that enroll in classes with a focus on emerging markets, sustainability, innovation, and entrepreneurship. Examples are courses in Entrepreneurship and Innovation (especially those that include one or more sessions on the social dimensions) as well as those in Inclusive Growth and Sustainable Development.

Details

The CASE Journal, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 1544-9106

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Article

Patrick Richard, Kristina D. West, Peter Shin, Mustafa Z. Younis and Sara Rosenbaum

In 2010 the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act boosted the expansion of community health centers (CHCs) with $11 billion in mandatory funding from 2011 to 2015…

Abstract

In 2010 the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act boosted the expansion of community health centers (CHCs) with $11 billion in mandatory funding from 2011 to 2015. This study used data from the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS) and the North Carolina Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) to assess the cost savings associated with the use of community health centers compared to other primary care providers. After controlling for various demographic, socioeconomic characteristics and health conditions, we found savings at an average of $3,437 in total expenditures and $1,211 in ambulatory care expenditures. These results suggest that continuing investment in health centers are important during times of budget cuts in order to improve access to care and to generate cost savings to the healthcare system.

Details

Journal of Public Budgeting, Accounting & Financial Management, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1096-3367

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Book part

Christa Boske and Azadeh F. Osanloo

Authors’ experiences encourage teachers and learners to consider the impact of integrating an intersensory transformative curriculum that explores how the senses interact…

Abstract

Authors’ experiences encourage teachers and learners to consider the impact of integrating an intersensory transformative curriculum that explores how the senses interact with each other in different combinations and hierarchies (see Howes, 2003). Such efforts may require a deeper and more comprehensive analysis of the senses in understanding self with a focus on increasing consciousness, meaning-making, and embodied experiences (Boske, 2011b; Burns, 1978; Eisner, 1994; Noddings, 1984). All human experiences are essential to interpretation of the senses. Attending to the sensorium, which embeds the senses throughout learning, may encourage connectedness among self and others; and ultimately, provide spaces to promote equity in schools. Teachers and learners, in developing this socioecological perspective by designing curricula to include readings and activities centered on deepening personal knowings, can work to collectively engage in making connections among self, social justice and equity, and addressing larger societal issues (Furman, 2012; Jean-Marie et al., 2009).

Details

Living the Work: Promoting Social Justice and Equity Work in Schools around the World
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-127-5

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Abstract

Details

Handbook of Transport Strategy, Policy and Institutions
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-0804-4115-3

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Book part

Marta B. Rodríguez-Galán and Luis M. Falcón

To examine aging Puerto Ricans’ experiences with and perceptions of depression treatment.

Abstract

Purpose

To examine aging Puerto Ricans’ experiences with and perceptions of depression treatment.

Methodology/approach

In-depth analysis of eight exemplary cases from ethnographic interviews with a subsample of 16 aging Puerto Ricans in the Boston area who are part of the Boston Puerto Rican Health Study.

Findings

The results show that respondents were resistant to accepting pharmacological treatment for their depression, and they often characterized antidepressants as “dope.” Moreover, they claimed that in addition to their health problems, social stressors such as financial strain, lack of jobs, housing problems, and social isolation are triggering or contributing to their depression. Because of this, they express reluctance in accepting clinical treatment only, and suggest that broader social issues and other health needs ought to be addressed as part of an effective treatment. For many, pharmacological treatment is acceptable only in the more severe forms of depression.

Research limitations/implications

These results have important implications for improving the quality of depression treatment and reducing health disparities for mainland Puerto Ricans.

Originality/value of chapter

Even though recent studies continue to show a high frequency of depression among Puerto Ricans, issues of treatment quality are still understudied and ethnographic accounts are especially lacking. Our study offers an exploratory investigation of this unresolved research issue.

Details

Technology, Communication, Disparities and Government Options in Health and Health Care Services
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-645-3

Keywords

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