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Article
Publication date: 30 September 2014

Gyles Glover, Anna Christie and Chris Hatton

The purpose of this paper is to present information from the Joint Health and Social Care Self-Assessment Framework (JHSCSAF) on reported rates of cervical cancer, breast…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present information from the Joint Health and Social Care Self-Assessment Framework (JHSCSAF) on reported rates of cervical cancer, breast cancer and bowel cancer screening for eligible people with learning disabilities in England in 2012/2013 compared to screening rates for the general population.

Design/methodology/approach

Between 94 and 101 Learning Disability Partnership Boards, as part of the JHSCSAF, provided information to allow the calculation of rates of cervical cancer, breast cancer and bowel cancer screening in their locality, for eligible people with learning disabilities and for the population as a whole.

Findings

At a national level, reported cancer screening coverage for eligible people with learning disabilities was substantially lower than for the population as a whole (cervical cancer screening 27.6 per cent of people with learning disabilities vs 70 per cent of total population; breast cancer screening 36.8 per cent of people with learning disabilities vs 57.8 per cent of total population; bowel cancer screening 28.1 per cent of people with learning disabilities vs 40.5 per cent of the general population). There were considerable geographical variations in reported coverage for all three screening programmes.

Originality/value

Consistent with previous research, localities in England report cancer screening rates for eligible people with learning disabilities considerably below those of the general population. There is an urgent need to address data availability and quality issues, as well as reasonable adjustments to cancer screening programmes to ensure uniformly high rates of cancer screening for people with learning disabilities across England.

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Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

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Article
Publication date: 20 December 2003

Vonny Martanegara and Brian H. Kleiner

The purpose of this article is to show the importance of pre‐employment screening for hospitals. Pre‐employment screening in the hiring process is a must for hospitals…

Abstract

The purpose of this article is to show the importance of pre‐employment screening for hospitals. Pre‐employment screening in the hiring process is a must for hospitals, especially in the health care industry, where financial damages and lawsuits for hospitals recently increased because of negligent hiring. The information in this article is based on books about human resources in the health care industry, journals about medicine and law, and mostly articles from outsourced screening firms that provide service in the health care field. The scope of the article is to show the effectiveness of employee screening for hospitals in order to prevent or minimise lawsuits because of negligent hiring. Based on information about the benefits of employment screening in the health care industry, it is important for hospitals to implement “due diligence” by including screening programmes in their hiring process. The screening process can be done in‐house or be delegated to outside service providers that match the criteria. It is better to outsource these tasks so that hospitals can focus on other human resources tasks such as managing their employees to improve services for their visitors or customers.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 26 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

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Article
Publication date: 5 October 2015

Anna Marriott, Sue Turner, Sharon Ashby and Deborah Rees

– The purpose of this paper is to describe the role of the screening liaison nurses for adults with learning disabilities employed by Peninsula Community Health.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe the role of the screening liaison nurses for adults with learning disabilities employed by Peninsula Community Health.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper reports on the national situation in regard to cancer screening for people with learning disabilities and explores the barriers which limit their participation in these screening programmes. It describes the screening liaison nurse role and presents case examples of the work they do.

Findings

The local screening rates for people with learning disabilities have increased since the creation of this role in 2011.

Originality/value

Increasing the uptake of cancer screening by people with learning disabilities is clearly in line with existing national priorities. To the author’s knowledge this is a unique role in this country and the authors propose that other areas would benefit from adopting this model of working.

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

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Article
Publication date: 13 September 2021

Ramesh Athe, Rinshu Dwivedi, Krushna Chandra Sahoo, Debdutta Bhattacharya, Shalu Jain and Sanghamitra Pati

Congenital hearing disabilities among children are associated with lifetime discrepancies in the attainment of speech, poor academic-performance, socio-individual…

Abstract

Purpose

Congenital hearing disabilities among children are associated with lifetime discrepancies in the attainment of speech, poor academic-performance, socio-individual isolation and emotional-maladjustments. The present study aims to combine evidence from randomized, controlled trials to assess the accuracy of hearing-screening procedures and relative diagnostic-tests concomitant with partial/permanent hearing loss (HL) among neonatal and under-five children.

Design/methodology/approach

The steps in this process were conducted according to the PRISMA (Preferred-Reporting-Items-for-Systematic-reviews-and-Meta-Analysis) guidelines. The PubMed, ProQuest, Science-Direct, Cochrane-Library and secondary reference databases were searched. Analyses were carried out by using fixed/random-effects-models for calculating the summary estimates on hearing-screening and test-procedure. Meta-regression-analysis is performed to explore the influence of confounders on the net-pooled effect.

Findings

A total of 1,656 articles were identified, and 1,575 were excluded as they were not relevant to the purpose of the study. Further, out of 81 studies, 67 were excluded with reasons and 14 were included in the final analysis. Three independent reviewers have assessed the titles/abstracts for their potential relevance. The results from meta-analysis indicate that hearing-screening was significantly higher in the intervention group (n 8,102; OR 0.52, 95% CI 0.34, 0.79; p < 0.00001), as depicted via forest plot. Meta-regression analysis indicates a positive relationship between the age and effect size (regression-coefficient 0.638, 95% CI 0.005, 0.731; p < 0.05).

Research limitations/implications

The evidence from the present study can be used as reference for identifying the associated risk indicators, improved hearing-screening and reduction of hearing disability among under-five children.

Practical implications

The results of this review will be used for implementation of a new-born hearing screening, diagnostic accuracy and understanding the risk indicators for HL among under-five children in the South-Asian region. The evidence will be helpful for strategic directions for improved hearing screening and reduction of hearing disability among under-five children.

Social implications

By understanding the underlying dynamics of hearing-screening procedures, hearing-impairments can be identified at an early stage and required treatment can be provided to the children.

Originality/value

The findings of this study indicate that early detection, screening and diagnosis of the HL among the children, especially among the infants and new-born (0–2 years of age), will be of utmost importance in reducing the prevalence of HL, especially among the South-Asian region. This study can be used as a reference for other future studies in the area of hearing-screening, diagnostic accuracy and associated risk indicators among children.

Details

International Journal of Human Rights in Healthcare, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4902

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Article
Publication date: 16 August 2021

Parveen Ali, Peter Allmark, Andrew Booth, Julie McGarry, Helen B. Woods and Farah Seedat

The purpose of this paper is to estimate the accuracy and effectiveness of screening tools and subsequent interventions in the detection and treatment of intimate partner…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to estimate the accuracy and effectiveness of screening tools and subsequent interventions in the detection and treatment of intimate partner violence (IPV) in non-high-risk settings (defined here as those in which routine IPV screening does not take place in the UK, such as in general practice).

Design/methodology/approach

Rapid review as defined by Grant and Booth – it is used under time or financial constraint to assess what is known using systematic review methods. Medline, PsycINFO, Embase and Cochrane Library databases to May 2019 were searched for “intimate partner violence” and synonyms plus terms related to screening and interventions. A Medline update was performed in August 2020. Data were extracted with the help of a predesigned tool and were synthesised to answer the two study aims. Data were mixed quantitative and qualitative.

Findings

The search yielded 10 relevant papers on screening (6 on accuracy and 4 on effectiveness) and 13 on intervention. These showed evidence of the effectiveness of simple screening tools and of subsequent interventions. However, the evidence was insufficient to support a change in UK guidelines which currently do not recommend their use outside of current high-risk environments.

Originality/value

Clinicians outside of high-risk areas should consider the use of some IPV screening tools and interventions but only within research protocols to gather further evidence.

Details

Journal of Criminal Psychology, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2009-3829

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Article
Publication date: 6 April 2021

Azime Karakoc Kumsar, Feride Taskin Yilmaz and Gulbahtiyar Demirel

The aim of this study is to determine the preferences to participate in diabetes screening program of women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) in postpartum period.

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this study is to determine the preferences to participate in diabetes screening program of women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) in postpartum period.

Design/methodology/approach

The data of retrospective and descriptive study were collected using “Individual Identification Form” and “Information Form for the Screening of Diabetes in the Postpartum Period” from 151 women in referred to obstetrics and gynecology clinic of a university hospital in Turkey.

Findings

Only 21.9% of women had diabetes screening in postpartum period and 21.2% of the participants were diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. It was determined that the participants mostly participated in screening because of the diabetes history in their family (30.3%). Women who had diabetes screening in postpartum period had lower level of education than those who did not and their level of knowledge about the screening in postpartum and the history of abortion were higher (p < 0.01).

Originality/value

The rate of participation in the screening for diabetes in the postpartum period is very low in pregnant women diagnosed with GDM. It was determined that the educational status, history of previous abortion and knowledge level of the women were factors that prevented participation in diabetes screening. This research is original because there are inadequacy of studies examining determining the participation status of pregnant women with GDM to diabetes screening in the literature. This study will contribute to health professionals in order to improve preventive factors and increase the participation of pregnant women with GDM in diabetes screening in the postpartum period.

Details

Journal of Health Research, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0857-4421

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Book part
Publication date: 8 August 2013

Donald H. Kluemper

It is widely established that many hiring managers view social networking websites (SNWs) such as LinkedIn and/or Facebook in the employment selection process, leading to…

Abstract

Purpose

It is widely established that many hiring managers view social networking websites (SNWs) such as LinkedIn and/or Facebook in the employment selection process, leading to the acceptance or rejection of job applicants. Due to the rapid evolution of social media, scientific study of SNWs has been substantially outpaced by organizational practice. This chapter focuses on a wide range of issues related to SNW screening relevant to research and practice.

Design/methodology/approach

The chapter: (1) reviews the current state of SNW screening practices, (2) describes a wide range of HR issues that should be considered such as privacy, discrimination, negligent hiring, validity, reliability, generalizability, impression management, applicant reactions, and utility, (3) draws connections to related issues already addressed by established employment selection methods to inform SNW screening, (4) discusses pros and cons of potential SNW screening approaches, and (5) provides a framework of best practices that should be incorporated into social network screening policies.

Findings

As an emerging employment selection approach, SNW screening demonstrates potential as a rich source of applicant information, but includes numerous legal and ethical issues. Further, these potential benefits and risks vary widely depending on the approaches used.

Originality/value

Provides HR practitioners with a wide range of information necessary to develop an effective social network screening policy, while making the case for academics to pursue research in this nascent area.

Details

Social Media in Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-901-0

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Book part
Publication date: 30 December 2004

Verle Headings

The premise of this work is that in most societies significant proportions of children do not experience optimum well-being. The goals of this work are: (1) to delineate…

Abstract

The premise of this work is that in most societies significant proportions of children do not experience optimum well-being. The goals of this work are: (1) to delineate and illustrate the tangled web of multifactorial causation and heterogeneity of causation for impaired well-being; and (2) to develop the proposition that these very characteristics of causation necessitates particular risk screening strategies which allow for timely interventions. The essence of such screening is to assess target effects which may be consequence of multiple factors, by cost-effective and universally applicable means. This screening paradigm will be examined briefly in relation to selected long standing screening systems, such as “triple test” screening of the fetus, and universal newborn genetic screening. The accumulated experiences with these systems provide some insights on strategic designated planning for risk screening which could be applied in areas of universal newborn screening for prenatal teratogen exposure effects, screening for indicators of systemically imposed disadvantages in the child’s experience, screening the child for inattention to quality of health, and screening for indicators of risk for violent behavior. Such applications of risk screening, if appropriately embedded in universal service structures, e.g. newborn nurseries and schools, can allow for timely interventions for the most vulnerable children.

Details

Administering Special Education: In Pursuit of Dignity and Autonomy
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-298-6

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Article
Publication date: 6 May 2021

Tauhidul Islam Tanin, Abu Umar Faruq Ahmad and Aishath Muneeza

This study explores the practical application of the Shariah screening process and how it could be enhanced by converging the same with the ethical screening of stocks.

Abstract

Purpose

This study explores the practical application of the Shariah screening process and how it could be enhanced by converging the same with the ethical screening of stocks.

Design/methodology/approach

This study adopts a qualitative research methodology by combining the qualitative descriptive approach and content analysis.

Findings

The findings of this research suggest that there is scope to converge ethical screening of stocks with Shariah Screening as the lex loci applicable to Shariah screening is derived from Shariah, which considers ethics as part of determining its rules.

Practical implications

The data from this study reveal several practical applications, the ultimate goal of which is to help the policymakers and stakeholders understand the relevance of the Shariah screening of stocks and get a streamlined screening process, paving the way to enhance the same using ethical screening criteria to develop its function to become much more relevant irrespective of the denomination of faiths.

Originality/value

This is original research, which is expected to contribute to understanding the extent to which Shariah screening can be enhanced by integrating the ethical stock screening dimension to it.

Details

International Journal of Emerging Markets, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-8809

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Book part
Publication date: 20 May 2017

Eline Aas, Tor Iversen and Geir Hoff

Misinterpretation of a negative test results in health screening may initiate less preventive effort and more future lifestyle-related disease. We predict that…

Abstract

Misinterpretation of a negative test results in health screening may initiate less preventive effort and more future lifestyle-related disease. We predict that misinterpretation occurs more frequently among individuals with a low level of education compared with individuals with a high level of education.

The empirical analyses are based on unique data from a randomized controlled screening experiment in Norway, NORCCAP (NORwegian Colorectal Cancer Prevention). The dataset consists of approximately 50,000 individuals, of whom 21,000 were invited to participate in a once only screening with sigmoidoscopy. For all individuals, we also have information on outpatient consultations and inpatient stays and education. The result of health behaviour is mainly measured by lifestyle-related diseases, such as COPD, hypertension and diabetes type 2, identified by ICD-10 codes.

The results according to intention-to-treat indicate that screening does not increase the occurrence of lifestyle related diseases among individuals with a high level of education, while there is an increase for individuals with low levels of education. These results are supported by the further analyses among individuals with a negative screening test.

Details

Human Capital and Health Behavior
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-466-2

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