Search results

1 – 10 of over 66000
Article
Publication date: 2 November 2022

Rafi M.M.I. Chowdhury and Felix Septianto

Nonprofit organizations face challenges recruiting volunteers for morally important activities that may generate fear, such as firefighting, aid work and delinquent…

Abstract

Purpose

Nonprofit organizations face challenges recruiting volunteers for morally important activities that may generate fear, such as firefighting, aid work and delinquent counseling. The purpose of this study is to examine how voluntary organizations can instill the virtue of courage among potential volunteers and motivate them to participate in such activities.

Design/methodology/approach

Three experimental studies examined how fear, hope and courage relate to the likelihood of volunteering. Study 1 investigated how integral hope (hope related to the context, i.e. hope emanating from volunteering activities) and incidental hope (hope unrelated to the context, i.e. a general hopeful feeling) affect volunteering intentions when there is low vs high fear. Study 2 examined whether courage mediated the effects of hope on volunteering intentions when there is low vs high fear. Study 3 replicated the findings in a different volunteering context.

Findings

Integral hope (but not incidental hope) in the face of high fear generates courage leading to intentions to volunteer. Both integral hope and incidental hope motivate volunteering intentions through positive affect (but not through courage) in low fear contexts.

Research limitations/implications

The hypothetical volunteering scenarios and the gender distribution in the samples restrict the external validity of the findings. Family background in volunteering was not controlled for. Moral courage, physical courage and psychological courage were not separately measured.

Practical implications

Nonprofit organizations recruiting volunteers for risky voluntary activities that induce high fear should use integral hope in their marketing communications to instill courage among potential volunteers. For voluntary activities that are not very risky and generate low levels of fear among potential volunteers, nonprofit organizations can recruit volunteers through communications that use either integral hope or incidental hope.

Originality/value

This research shows that hope and fear are critical emotions in relation to courage – an essential virtue for volunteers. Courage is manifested when there is high fear and integral hope. Findings contribute to the research literatures on the marketing of volunteering and the moral psychology of courage.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 October 2022

Minhajul Islam Ukil and Anna Jenkins

Despite entrepreneurial intentions being a central and enduring construct in entrepreneurship research, most research on intentions focused on factors that underpin an…

Abstract

Purpose

Despite entrepreneurial intentions being a central and enduring construct in entrepreneurship research, most research on intentions focused on factors that underpin an individual's entrepreneurial intentions. This study extends the emerging literature on fear of failure and resilience to understand how they influence entrepreneurial intentions. The authors do this in a context where job prospects are low, and unemployment is high to understand what potentially prevents educated youth in a developing country from pursuing self-employment.

Design/methodology/approach

This study applies the structural equation modelling (SEM) using AMOS 25 to test the hypotheses on a sample of 238 third- and fourth-year Bangladeshi students facing an important career decision. A replication study is also conducted with an additional sample (n = 209) to verify the robustness of the findings, using a different measurement of resilience and a different analysis method – partial least square (PLS)-SEM in Smart-PLS 3.

Findings

The study finds support for the mediation model where fear of failure mediates the relationship between resilience and entrepreneurial intentions. The findings suggest that resilience enhances entrepreneurial intentions while also reducing the negative effects of fear of failure on entrepreneurial intentions.

Originality/value

This study contributes to an underexplored area of entrepreneurial intentions literature by exploring how resilience relates to fear of failure and entrepreneurial intentions. The findings demonstrate the importance of resilience through its direct effect on intentions as well as its indirect effect through its influence on fear of failure. The findings have implications for potential entrepreneurs and educational institutions providing training in entrepreneurship.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 31 January 2011

Terence Laing and Michelle Davies

The current study investigated fear of crime and perceived risk of victimisation in a general population sample of gay and heterosexual men in the United Kingdom. 55 gay…

Abstract

The current study investigated fear of crime and perceived risk of victimisation in a general population sample of gay and heterosexual men in the United Kingdom. 55 gay and 57 heterosexual men were recruited via opportunity sampling, in Manchester, north‐west England. They were required to complete a questionnaire asking about their fear of becoming a victim of several different types of crime, their perceived risk of victimisation, types of avoidance behaviours in which they partake, and experiences of crime.Results indicated that gay men had higher levels of fear and perceived risk of victimisation than heterosexual men, for most crimes tested. Avoidance of crime, and personal experience of victimisation significantly related to both fear of crime and perceived risk of victimisation. Risk of victimisation, being gay, previously having been victimised and experience of incivilities were highlighted as key factors predicting levels of fear.In conclusion, methodological issues and future research are considered.

Details

Journal of Aggression, Conflict and Peace Research, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-6599

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 September 2022

Gaurav Deep Rai and Saurabh Verma

Principally, this study aims to test a conceptual framework of the moderating influence of fear of COVID-19 on the following hypothesized relationships (1) quality of work…

Abstract

Purpose

Principally, this study aims to test a conceptual framework of the moderating influence of fear of COVID-19 on the following hypothesized relationships (1) quality of work life and bankers' commitment, (2) the mediating spillover effect of job satisfaction in the quality of work life (QWL) and affective commitment relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

A quantitative cross-sectional research design is adopted on 318 bankers chosen from four prominent Indian cities. The mediation model is tested through SPSS, PROCESS macro, and AMOS. Conditional process modeling is also administered to test the moderating effect of fear of COVID-19.

Findings

The results suggest that the positive effect of QWL on commitment is completely mediated through job satisfaction. Further, the fear induced by COVID-19 negatively moderated the positive direct relation of QWL with commitment and the positive mediating spillover effect of job satisfaction.

Originality/value

The present research is virtually the first to introduce fear of COVID-19 as a psychological construct, to test a moderated mediation model for implications to organizational behavior and human psychology theory and practice. In coalescence of the need satisfaction, spillover, and COR theories, the authors postulate that as spillover between the domains of an individual's life (work, social, financial, personal, and overall life satisfaction) occurs, such effect is calibrated (augmented or attenuated) by the degree of risk/threat/depletion of their resources in the quest for attaining higher valued resources (overall life satisfaction). The moderated mediation mechanism is suggested for replication in other avenues for greater generalizability.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 February 2010

David J. Burns, Chris Manolis and William W. Keep

The purpose of this paper is to explore the impact of fear of crime on consumer shopping intentions at a secondary business district in the USA.

759

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the impact of fear of crime on consumer shopping intentions at a secondary business district in the USA.

Design/methodology/approach

Qualitative methodologies are used to first develop factors associated with fear of crime. These factors are then tested quantitatively with a sample of residents from a community bordering an established secondary shopping district. The model, which also includes behavior and subjective social norms as explanatory variables, is tested using multiple ordinary least square regression.

Findings

Only a single factor associated with fear of crime (which includes measures of vagrancies, lighting, and cleanliness) is found to be significantly related to shopping intentions. The findings do not differ between males and females. The remaining five factors associated with fear of crime are not significantly related to shopping intentions.

Research limitations/implications

The paper is limited to a single location and measures shopping intentions but not actual shopping activity. Future research can build in these two areas.

Practical implications

Retailers located in older shopping districts are challenged to renew interest among shoppers. This paper suggests that by focusing on a few key environmental characteristics, retailers can reduce the fear of crime and improve consumers' shopping intentions.

Originality/value

Given the many older, secondary shopping districts, this paper is one of a few to link specific shopping district characteristics to fear of crime and shopping intentions.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 38 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2014

Brandon Chase

Guided by Ericson’s counter-law analytic, the focus of this paper is how peace bonds erode traditional criminal law principles to govern uncertainty and provide applicants…

Abstract

Guided by Ericson’s counter-law analytic, the focus of this paper is how peace bonds erode traditional criminal law principles to govern uncertainty and provide applicants with a “freedom from fear” (Ericson, 2007a). Peace bonds permit the courts to impose a recognizance on anyone likely to cause harm or “personal injury” to a complainant. This paper conducts a critical discourse analysis to answer the question: how and to what extent are peace bonds a form of counter-law? Facilitated by the erosion of traditional criminal law principles and rationalized under a precautionary logic, proving that a complainant is fearful through a peace bond can result in the expansion of the state’s capacity to criminalize and conduct surveillance.

Details

Studies in Law, Politics, and Society
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-785-6

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 8 August 2016

Rose Weitz

This chapter explores military women’s fear of sexual assault, especially while deployed overseas, the strategies they use to manage those fears, and the health…

Abstract

Purpose

This chapter explores military women’s fear of sexual assault, especially while deployed overseas, the strategies they use to manage those fears, and the health consequences of both their fears and their strategies for reducing them.

Methodology/approach

Data come from 25 in-depth, semi-structured qualitative interviews conducted in 2012 and 2013 with women veterans and military members. All participants were under age 45 and had deployed to Iraq or Afghanistan at some point.

Findings

Surprisingly, 44% reported neither concern about sexual assault nor any special strategies taken to prevent it. In contrast, another 44% reported both concern about sexual assault and special strategies taken to prevent it. Finally, 12% reported no special concerns about sexual assault due to the strategies they took to prevent it. For these latter two groups, rape-preventions strategies and the fears that led to them could contribute to lack of exercise, sleep difficulties, anxiety, depression, or post-traumatic stress disorder.

Research limitations/implications

This research is based on a small and non-random sample which over-represents southwestern residents, whites, Army members, and commissioned officers, and under-represents African Americans, Navy members, noncommissioned officers, and enlisted personnel. As a result, it cannot be used to extrapolate to the population more generally. It also focuses solely on women’s experiences, due to their greater risk of assault, although men’s experiences with sexual trauma certainly deserve further study. Finally, the research relied on only one coder, which may have reduced reliability. However, it is less likely to have reduced validity compared to studies utilizing multiple coders, since such studies typically use coders who either share or have been trained to use the main authors’ intellectual perspectives.

Originality/value

Previous research has looked at the effect of sexual assault on female military members. This chapter extends that research by exploring how fear of rape can affect female military members even if they are not themselves assaulted, with a special focus on its health effects. In addition, previous research on fear of rape in the general population has focused on its social effects. This chapter suggests the need for further research on potential health effects of fear of rape in the general population.

Details

Special Social Groups, Social Factors and Disparities in Health and Health Care
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-467-9

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 7 July 2015

Marilena Antoniadou, Peter John Sandiford, Gillian Wright and Linda Patricia Alker

This chapter explores how Cypriot lecturers perceive and experience fear while being at work. Drawing on the lens of interpretive inquiry, data were collected through…

Abstract

This chapter explores how Cypriot lecturers perceive and experience fear while being at work. Drawing on the lens of interpretive inquiry, data were collected through interviews with 19 lecturers. Analysis focused on experiences of workplace fear offering rich insights into characteristics of fear, eliciting events, and coping ways. Findings help to unveil the specific events that lead to fear in the Cypriot universities, and the ways lecturers manage their fearful experiences. The study contributes to the study of discrete emotions, by empirically examining fear’s own storyline through the workers’ own perspectives, within a specific context.

Details

New Ways of Studying Emotions in Organizations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-220-7

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 August 2022

Moustafa Mohamed Nazief Haggag Kotb Kholaif, Xiao Ming and Gutama Kusse Getele

This research aims to profoundly investigate the post-COVID-19's opportunities for customer-centric green supply chain management (GSCM) and perceived customer resilience…

Abstract

Purpose

This research aims to profoundly investigate the post-COVID-19's opportunities for customer-centric green supply chain management (GSCM) and perceived customer resilience by studying the correlation between fear-uncertainty of COVID-19, customer-centric GSCM, and the perceived customers' resilience. Moreover, to examine how the perceived corporate social responsibility (CSR) activities moderates the relationship among the variables.

Design/methodology/approach

In this study partial least squares structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM) was adopted on a sample of 298 managers and customers in the Egyptian small and medium enterprises (SMEs) market for data analysis and hypotheses testing.

Findings

Preliminary results indicate that the fear-uncertainty of COVID-19 positively affects customer-centric GSCM. Also, external CSR moderates the association between fear-uncertainty towards COVID-19 and customer-centric GSCM. However, internal CSR does not moderate this relationship. Customer-centric GSCM has a significant positive impact on the perceived environmental and social resilience. However, it has an insignificant effect on the perceived financial resilience. Also, customer-centric GSCM has a significant mediation outcome on the relation between fear-uncertainty of COVID-19 and the perceived environmental and social resilience. However, this relation is insignificant regarding the perceived financial resilience.

Practical implications

Managers could develop a consistent strategy for applying CSR practices, providing clear information and focusing on their procedures to meet their customer needs during COVID-19. Governments and managers should develop a consistent strategy to apply customer-oriented green practices to achieve customers' resilience, especially during the pandemic.

Originality/value

Based on the “social-cognitive,” “stakeholder” and “consumer culture” theories, this study shed light on the optimistic side of the COVID-19 pandemic, as it also brings the concepts of social responsibility, resilience and green practices back into the light, which helps in solving customers' issues and help to achieve their resilience.

Details

International Journal of Emerging Markets, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-8809

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 19 September 2022

Sarah Chiumbu, Nkosinothando Mpofu and Konosoang Sobane

Fear appeals are persuasive messages that attempt to arouse fear to motivate or influence behaviour change and are widely used in health promotion. This chapter analyses…

Abstract

Fear appeals are persuasive messages that attempt to arouse fear to motivate or influence behaviour change and are widely used in health promotion. This chapter analyses how fear appeal messaging was used by the Namibian and South African mainstream print media to communicate COVID-19 during the two countries’ main waves of the pandemic. Specifically, we examine the framing strategies that the media used to persuade behaviour change. Mainstream media has enormous potential to influence health-related behaviour and perceptions. Therefore, it is compelling to examine the mainstream media’s framing of COVID-19. This study draws on framing theory to examine media frames and the use of fear appeal in the coverage of COVID-19 in the top English-language newspapers in the two countries. We argue in this chapter that using fear appeals in public health communication by the media may be counterproductive as a tool of persuasion.

Details

COVID-19 and the Media in Sub-Saharan Africa: Media Viability, Framing and Health Communication
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80382-272-3

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 66000