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Article
Publication date: 10 November 2020

Lingyun Guo, Xiayu Hu, Xuguang Wei and Xiaonan Cai

This paper aims to help hosts or service providers of sharing economy-based accommodation (SEA) to attract new customers and retain existing customers by exploring the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to help hosts or service providers of sharing economy-based accommodation (SEA) to attract new customers and retain existing customers by exploring the antecedents and outcomes of customersparticipation intention.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire-based empirical study was conducted to explore the proposed relationships in SEA. Partial least squares modeling with SmartPLS was used to estimate the model and interpret the results.

Findings

The study shows that personal factors (utilitarian and hedonic motivation) positively influence customersparticipation intention. The relationship between environmental stimuli (perceived information fit-to-task and perceived visual appeal) and participation intention is negatively moderated by hedonic motivation. Furthermore, the results suggest a positive effect of participation intention on customer engagement behavior and the partial mediating role of experience evaluation.

Practical implications

This paper provides industry practitioners of SEA with valuable insights on attracting new customers and retaining regular customers. First, they can distinguish customers in terms of motivation and provide information based on their requirements. Second, they can encourage customers to evaluate their experience and provide feedback, which would help in promoting the accommodation and service and building a long-term and harmonious relationship with the customers.

Originality/value

This study first investigates the interaction effect of personal motivation and environmental stimuli on participation intention in SEA. It further examines the influence of participation intention on customer engagement behavior and the mediating role of experience evaluation.

研究目的

本论文旨在帮助SEA(共享经济住宿)的民宿老板或服务提供者, 通过探索顾客参与和契合的影响因子和反应变量, 来吸引新顾客以及保留老顾客。

研究设计/方法/途径

本论文采用问卷形式实际调研, 探索SEA中的各种假设关系。本论文采用SmartPLS软件, 使用PLS分析法来检验模型以及展示分析结果。

研究结果

本论文结果表明, 个人因素(功利与享乐需求)正向影响顾客参与。环境因素(感知信息适合和感知视觉吸引)与参与意愿之间被享乐需求负向调节。此外, 结果还表明参与意愿对于顾客契合行为有着正向作用, 以及体验评价的部分中介效应。

研究实践启示

本论文为SEA企业从业人员提供如何吸引新顾客以及留住老顾客的宝贵见解。首先, 顾客根据需求和基于他们的需求所提供的信息可进行区分。第二, 企业主应该鼓励顾客评价他们的体验和提供反馈, 从而帮助提高住宿服务以及建立与顾客长期和谐的关系。

研究原创性/价值

本论文首先调研了个人需求和环境刺激对SEA参与意愿的相互作用。其次, 本论文还检验了参与意愿对于顾客契合行为的作用, 以及体验评价的中介效应。

Details

Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Technology, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-9880

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Article
Publication date: 25 September 2020

Lishan Xie, Dongmei Li and Hean Tat Keh

This research aims to contribute to the transformative service research (TSR) literature by examining how customer participation in the service process influences their…

Abstract

Purpose

This research aims to contribute to the transformative service research (TSR) literature by examining how customer participation in the service process influences their service experience and eudaimonic well-being, as moderated by customer empowerment and social support.

Design/methodology/approach

In the contexts of wedding (n = 623) and tourism services (n = 520), two surveys were conducted to test the hypotheses using mediation and moderation analyses.

Findings

Customer participation had a positive effect on their well-being, as mediated by service experience. These effects were moderated by customer empowerment and social support. Specifically, customer empowerment negatively moderated the relationship between customer participation and their service experience for both services. In addition, the moderating effect of social support on the relationship between customer participation and service experience was positive for the wedding service but negative for the tourism service.

Practical implications

The findings imply that firms should encourage customer participation to enhance their service experience and well-being. In addition, the firm could judiciously empower customers by adapting to the level of customer participation. Furthermore, depending on the complexity of the service required to produce the expected service outcomes, the firm may encourage the customers to engage their social network for support.

Originality/value

This research uses the service ecosystem perspective to examine the roles of the customer, the firm and the customer's social network in shaping their service experience and well-being for two common and important mental stimulus services, enriching the authors’ understanding on the role mental stimulus services play in enhancing consumers' eudaimonic well-being.

Details

Journal of Service Theory and Practice, vol. 30 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-6225

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2018

Chia-Yi Chen

Previous studies offer two contradictory propositions for the influence of customer participation on service failure attribution. The purpose of this paper is to solve…

Abstract

Purpose

Previous studies offer two contradictory propositions for the influence of customer participation on service failure attribution. The purpose of this paper is to solve this theoretical inconsistency by incorporating the concept of self-efficacy into its theoretical framework.

Design/methodology/approach

Two 2 (customer participation: high vs low) by 2 (self-efficacy: high vs low) experimental designs were employed under scenarios relating to education and haircut services.

Findings

The results show that customers with high self-efficacy attribute more responsibility to the firms for a service failure as their participation in service increases. In contrast, customers with low self-efficacy are less likely to blame firms for service failures in the high-participation condition than in the low-participation condition.

Practical implications

This study suggests that understanding customers’ self-efficacy could help firms improve recovery performance according to customers’ individual differences if service failure occurs.

Originality/value

The findings help resolve conflicting results reported in the literature and show that the impact of customer participation on service failure attribution differs according to customers’ self-efficacy. Therefore, this study provides a theoretical contribution by enhancing the knowledge of how customer participation influences causal attribution and satisfaction after a service failure.

Details

Journal of Service Theory and Practice, vol. 28 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-6225

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Article
Publication date: 2 October 2017

Shampy Kamboj and Zillur Rahman

The purpose of this paper is to develop and validate a scale to measure customer social participation in brand communities, specifically e-travel companies’ communities.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop and validate a scale to measure customer social participation in brand communities, specifically e-travel companies’ communities.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative research has been undertaken to generate a pool of items. Based on Churchill’s (1979) scale development process, numerous reliability and validity tests have been conducted to confirm the scale structure. Data were collected through online and field surveys from the students and hotel guests who have either subscribed, liked or joined any e-travel service companies’ community brand page using any social networking site or have ever posted or considered reviews and ratings of any e-travel service companies via their official site or via a mobile app while planning their travel.

Findings

The findings depict nine items on a three-dimensional scale for measuring customer participation in travel brand communities created on social networking sites.

Research limitations/implications

The findings provide important implications for hotel and travel managers and are likely to encourage future studies in the field of social media and travel brand communities.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the literature by providing refinement to the distinct operationalization and conceptualization of customer online participation, specifically in social media-based travel brand communities. This paper is the first to develop a multidimensional scale of customer social participation in e-travel companies’ communities. This is a new addition to existing literature, as the majority of empirical studies in this field are from participation other than customer social participation and contexts different from e-travel companies.

Details

Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Technology, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-9880

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Article
Publication date: 5 November 2019

Shampy Kamboj

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how various gratifications obtained in the social media context affect customer participation, and its sequential effect on…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how various gratifications obtained in the social media context affect customer participation, and its sequential effect on brand trust, brand commitment and word of mouth (WOM) in social media brand communities.

Design/methodology/approach

The data were collected from 352 respondents who used social media using a survey method. The data were assessed using AMOS with structural equation modeling.

Findings

The findings depicted that among all gratifications obtained in the social media context, information seeking, incentive and brand likeability strongly affect customer participation, which sequentially affect brand trust, commitment and WOM in social media brand communities. In the context of social media brand communities, brand trust partially mediates the relationship between customer participation and its two outcome variables (brand commitment and WOM).

Originality/value

The present paper contributes that theory of uses and gratifications has particular significance and supposed to be provided further importance in the field of social media. It also presents a vivid and rich understanding of why customers use social media and participate in social media brand communities.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 32 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

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Article
Publication date: 15 November 2018

Atieh Poushneh and Arturo Z. Vasquez-Parraga

This study aims to answer the following question: How can customer readiness be instrumental in non-technology-based service delivery?

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to answer the following question: How can customer readiness be instrumental in non-technology-based service delivery?

Design/methodology/approach

Using a field study, this research examines the role of customer readiness in customer participation in non-technology-based service delivery and its indirect effects on such customer outcomes as perceived service quality, customer satisfaction and customer willingness to recommend.

Findings

The results show that customer readiness is a second-order construct. It has a significant impact on customer participation in service delivery, which in turn impacts three key service outcomes: customer perceived service quality, customer satisfaction and customer willingness to recommend. Four factors influencing customer readiness (consumer previous experience, consumer desire for control, consumer perceived risk and customer organizational socialization) are also empirically evaluated.

Research limitations/implications

Some limitations of the study are related to sample size and use of a type of services. The research tested 13 hypotheses with a limited sample size in one context. A better representation of the population and a more generalizable outcome require more representative samples and studies in various contexts such as banking, hotel services or health care services. This study demonstrated the importance of customer readiness for effective participation in non-technology-based service delivery; it does not address the impact of customer readiness on participation in the context of technology-based services. Future research may also shed light on when and why customers choose technology-based services versus non-technology-based services.

Practical implications

Effective customer participation in service delivery can, and should, benefit from boosting customer readiness.

Originality/value

This research shows the impact of customer readiness on non-technology-based service delivery, more specifically, the impact of customer readiness on customer participation in this type of service delivery. Customer readiness has been found to be beneficial in the provision of technology-based services; yet, its role in the provision of non-technology-based services has not been thoroughly evaluated.

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Article
Publication date: 11 December 2017

Babak Taheri, Filipe J. Coelho, Carlos M.P. Sousa and Heiner Evanschitzky

Customers play a key role in value creation. Not surprisingly, research has investigated customers’ motivations to engage in the creation of value. Thus, this study aims…

Abstract

Purpose

Customers play a key role in value creation. Not surprisingly, research has investigated customers’ motivations to engage in the creation of value. Thus, this study aims to assess the link between mood-regulatory processes and customer participation in value creation.

Design/methodology/approach

This study develops a model that relates mood-regulatory processes to customer participation and customer value creation, and tests it with a sample of 419 hotel customers, using partial least squares estimation.

Findings

It is found that mood clarity relates directly with customer relational value; mood monitoring relates directly with customer participation as well as directly and indirectly with customer economic and relational value; and mood repair relates directly with customer participation and customer economic value, as well as indirectly with customer economic and relational value.

Research limitations/implications

This is a cross-sectional study limited only to hotels in Iran. This is the first study to evaluate the relationship between mood regulation with customer participation and value creation. Hospitality service organizations interested in promoting customer participation may consider mood as a segmentation criterion.

Originality/value

Value creation theory was applied to identify the relationship among customer mood regulation, participation, economic value and relational value, as it is first attempted in the hospitality studies.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 29 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 8 April 2019

Aswathy Asokan Ajitha, Piyush Sharma, Russel P.J. Kingshott, Upendra Kumar Maurya and Arshinder Kaur

The purpose of this paper is to contribute to transformative service research by drawing on self-determination, elicitation of emotions framework and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to contribute to transformative service research by drawing on self-determination, elicitation of emotions framework and feelings-as-information theories to explore how customer participation, task-related affective well-being, customer knowledge, task complexity and service outcomes relate with each other.

Design/methodology/approach

A synthesis of relevant literature on customer participation and customer well-being reveals a conceptual model with 11 testable propositions.

Findings

The conceptual model shows that task-related affective well-being mediates the link between customer participation and service outcomes. Moreover, customer knowledge and task complexity moderate these links.

Research limitations/implications

An empirically testable conceptual model models the roles of task-related affective well-being, customer knowledge and task complexity in the process by which customer participation influences service outcomes.

Practical implications

Service managers can use the model to design services based on the effects of different types of customer participation on task-related affective well-being.

Originality/value

This paper is one of the first to study the mediating role of task-related affective well-being in the relationship between customer participation and service outcomes. It does so by revealing the differential impact various types of participation have on service outcomes and the moderating role of customer knowledge and task complexity.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 33 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Article
Publication date: 6 September 2018

Chung-Yu Wang

The purpose of this paper is to examine how customers derive value and switching costs from their own participation conditional on their perceived efficacy of themselves…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine how customers derive value and switching costs from their own participation conditional on their perceived efficacy of themselves (self-efficacy) and their advisers (adviser-efficacy) in financial services.

Design/methodology/approach

Student interviewers approached customers exiting banks with a skip interval of two. The respondents received the questionnaire items translated into Chinese. The final survey sample consists of 220 respondents.

Findings

Empirical results confirm that customer participation influences switching costs through customer value. The synergistic effect of self-efficacy and adviser-efficacy moderates the relationships among customer participation, customer value and switching costs. The incongruent levels of self-efficacy and adviser-efficacy can increase customer value and switching costs.

Originality/value

This study looks beyond self-efficacy to demonstrate that the synergistic roles of self-efficacy and adviser-efficacy significantly influence the relationships among customer participation, customer value and switching costs.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 37 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 29 August 2019

Xinchun Wang and Xiaoyu Yu

The purpose of this study is to investigate whether two different participation strategies (i.e. deep participation and broad participation) in a supplier’s product…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate whether two different participation strategies (i.e. deep participation and broad participation) in a supplier’s product development process will result in different levels of customer-perceived value. In addition, this paper examines the moderating effects of customer risk-aversion and technology turbulence on the relationship between customer participation depth/breadth and customer-perceived value.

Design/methodology/approach

A theory-based model is developed and tested using data collected from 196 business-to-business firms. A multiple-regression approach was used to test the hypotheses.

Findings

Drawing on the transaction cost theory, the results reveal that while deep participation is likely to result in increased customer-perceived value, broad participation may hurt the relationship performance by reducing customer-perceived value. Moreover, the findings suggest that these effects are contingent on at least two contextual factors: how risk-averse the customer is and how turbulent the technological environment is.

Originality/value

This study is among the first to disaggregate the customer participation process into two different strategies, namely, deep participation and broad participation. It also extends the current literature by providing more insights about the dynamics involved in the customer participation process.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 34 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

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