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Article
Publication date: 13 April 2020

Ci-Rong Li, Yanyu Yang, Chen-Ju Lin and Ying Xu

This research adopts a dynamic self-regulation framework to test whether there is a curvilinear relationship between creative self-efficacy and individual creative…

Abstract

Purpose

This research adopts a dynamic self-regulation framework to test whether there is a curvilinear relationship between creative self-efficacy and individual creative performance at the within-person level. Furthermore, to establish a boundary condition of the predicted relationship, the authors build a cross-level model and examine how approach motivation and avoidance motivation moderate the complex relationship between creative self-efficacy and individual creative performance.

Design/methodology/approach

To obtain results from a within-person analysis, the authors collect multi-source data from 125 technicians who provided monthly reports over an 8-month period.

Findings

The authors find evidence of an inverted U-shaped relationship between creative self-efficacy and individual creative performance at the within-person level and differential moderating effects of approach/avoidance motivations.

Originality/value

This study is one of the first to challenge the assumption that creative self-efficacy always has a positive linear relationship with creativity. It provides a more complete view of the complex pattern between creative self-efficacy and creativity at the within-person level.

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Book part
Publication date: 16 July 2018

Serge P. da Motta Veiga, Daniel B. Turban, Allison S. Gabriel and Nitya Chawla

Searching for a job is an important process that influences short- and long-term career outcomes as well as well-being and psychological health. As such, job search…

Abstract

Searching for a job is an important process that influences short- and long-term career outcomes as well as well-being and psychological health. As such, job search research has grown tremendously over the last two decades. In this chapter, the authors provide an overview of prior research, discuss important trends in current research, and suggest areas for future research. The authors conceptualize the job search as an unfolding process (i.e., a process through which job seekers navigate through stages to achieve their goal of finding and accepting a job) in which job seekers engage in self-regulation behaviors. The authors contrast research that has taken a between-person, static approach with research that has taken a within-person, dynamic approach and highlight the importance of combining between- and within-person designs in order to have a more holistic understanding of the job search process. Finally, authors provide some recommendations for future research. Much remains to be learned about what influences job search self-regulation, and how job self-regulation influences job search and employment outcomes depending on individual, contextual, and environmental factors.

Details

Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-322-3

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Book part
Publication date: 26 June 2012

Phillip Gee, Timothy Ballard, Gillian Yeo and Andrew Neal

Affect is a dynamic construct that varies over time and can significantly influence motivation and performance in organisational contexts. This chapter addresses key…

Abstract

Affect is a dynamic construct that varies over time and can significantly influence motivation and performance in organisational contexts. This chapter addresses key conceptual and methodological challenges that arise when aiming to measure affect as a within-person process. The literature has been divided on whether the structure of affect is unipolar or bipolar and no research has considered this structure across levels of analysis. Measuring affect as a within-person process also requires a brief scale that can be administered with minimal disruption. This chapter presents data that provide evidence for bipolarity in the structure of affect. We use these data to validate the momentary affect scale, which is a new brief affect scale that can be used in within-person research designs and applied settings.

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Experiencing and Managing Emotions in the Workplace
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-676-8

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Article
Publication date: 27 October 2020

Marne H. Pomerance, Patrick D. Converse and Nicholas A. Moon

Substantial research has examined the self-concept, but little work has investigated the contents and structure of the self-concept in combination within performance…

Abstract

Purpose

Substantial research has examined the self-concept, but little work has investigated the contents and structure of the self-concept in combination within performance settings, particularly from a within-person perspective. Thus, this research developed and examined a conceptual framework based on Greenwald et al. (2002) to understand how core self-evaluations (CSE) and self-concept clarity (SCC) interact to influence motivational orientation with implications for performance dimensions.

Design/methodology/approach

Full-time employees (N = 138) completed daily measures of CSE, SCC, motivational orientation, organizational citizenship behaviors (OCBs) and counterproductive work behaviors (CWBs) over the course of three weeks.

Findings

Multilevel modeling indicated CSE influences motivational orientation, SCC can moderate these relationships and motivational orientation relates to OCBs and counterproductive work behaviors.

Originality/value

This work contributes to this research area by developing and examining an integrative conceptual framework involving aspects of self-concept, motivation and performance from a within-person perspective.

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Book part
Publication date: 6 September 2021

Rachel M. Saef, Emorie Beck and Joshua J. Jackson

Our theoretical understanding of subjective well-being in the workplace is incomplete without a dynamic understanding of antecedents and outcomes of subjective well-being…

Abstract

Our theoretical understanding of subjective well-being in the workplace is incomplete without a dynamic understanding of antecedents and outcomes of subjective well-being. While between-person differences provide useful information about employee outcomes, these differences do not provide information about the relationships between subjective well-being and employee outcomes that evolve over time and across situations. In this paper, we discuss specific statistical methods within the nomothetic and idiographic perspectives that can support dynamic research on subjective well-being in the workplace and outline unanswered contemporary questions regarding structure, processes, and dynamics of subjective well-being that may be addressed with these methods reviewed; some of which were proposed in early research but progressed slowly due to a lack of adequate methods. This discussion highlights how idiographic methods from outside organizational psychology can be applied to the study of worker subjective well-being to strengthen this dynamic approach in a way that addresses limitations associated with reliance on between-person models.

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Examining and Exploring the Shifting Nature of Occupational Stress and Well-Being
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80117-422-0

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Article
Publication date: 12 September 2016

Gaëtane Caesens, Florence Stinglhamber and Marc Ohana

Prior research has conceptualized perceived organizational support (POS) as a stable variable over time varying from one individual to another. Nevertheless, it can be…

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Abstract

Purpose

Prior research has conceptualized perceived organizational support (POS) as a stable variable over time varying from one individual to another. Nevertheless, it can be assumed that POS fluctuates within the same person over the course of several weeks due to different experiences lived at work. The authors suggested in the present study that weekly POS is predictive of employees’ weekly subjective well-being at work (i.e. increased positive affect toward the organization, and decreased negative affect toward the organization and psychological strains at work). In addition, the purpose of this paper is to examine the mediating role played by weekly work engagement in these relationships.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 20 employees completed a first general questionnaire and then completed an online questionnaire during 12 consecutive weeks.

Findings

Results of hierarchical linear models indicated that weekly POS positively predicts weekly employees’ work engagement which, in turn, positively predicts weekly employees’ well-being (i.e. increasing positive affect toward the organization and decreasing negative affect toward the organization and psychological strains at work).

Research limitations/implications

Overall, these findings contribute to the POS and work engagement literatures. It shows that POS fluctuates within person over the course of several weeks and is a predictor of weekly employees’ well-being through its effects on weekly work engagement.

Originality/value

To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study to examine within-person weekly variations in POS as a predictor of employees’ weekly work engagement and its subsequent consequences.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 31 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Book part
Publication date: 26 September 2005

Howard M. Weiss and Daniel J. Beal

In the few years since the appearance of Affective Events Theory (AET), organizational research on emotions has continued its accelerating pace and incorporated many…

Abstract

In the few years since the appearance of Affective Events Theory (AET), organizational research on emotions has continued its accelerating pace and incorporated many elements of the macrostructure suggested by AET. In this chapter we reflect upon the original intentions of AET, review the literature that has spoken most directly to these intentions, and discuss where we should go from here. Throughout, we emphasize that AET represented not a testable theory, but rather a different paradigm for studying affect at work. Our review reveals an obvious shift toward AET in the way organizational researchers study affect at work, but also that some elements have been neglected. Ultimately, we see the most fruitful research coming from further delineation of the underlying processes implicated by the macrostructure of AET.

Details

The Effect of Affect in Organizational Settings
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-234-4

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Book part
Publication date: 6 September 2021

Stuti Thapa, Louis Tay and Daphne Hou

Experience sampling methods (ESM) have enabled researchers to capture intensive longitudinal data and how worker well-being changes over time. The conceptual advances in…

Abstract

Experience sampling methods (ESM) have enabled researchers to capture intensive longitudinal data and how worker well-being changes over time. The conceptual advances in understanding the variability of well-being are discussed. These emerging forms in the literature include affective inertia, affective variability, affective reactivity, and density distributions. While most ESM research has relied on the active provision of data by participants (i.e., self-reports), technological advances have enabled different forms of passive sensing that are useful for assessing and tracking well-being and its contextual factors. These include accelerometer data, location data, and physiological data. The strengths and weaknesses of passively sensed data and future ways forward are discussed, where the use of both active and passive forms of ESM data in the assessment and promotion of worker well-being is expected.

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Examining and Exploring the Shifting Nature of Occupational Stress and Well-Being
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80117-422-0

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 19 October 2020

Kate Letheren, Rebekah Russell-Bennett, Lucas Whittaker, Stephen Whyte and Uwe Dulleck

Purpose – The purpose of this chapter is to conduct a critical literature review that examines the origins and development of research on service robots in organizations…

Abstract

Purpose – The purpose of this chapter is to conduct a critical literature review that examines the origins and development of research on service robots in organizations, as well as the key emotional and cognitive issues between service employees, customers, and robots. This review provides a foundation for future research that leverages the emotional connection between service robots and humans.

Design/Methodology/Approach A critical literature review that examines robotics, artificial intelligence, emotions, approach/avoid behavior, and cognitive biases is conducted.

Findings – This research provides six key themes that emerge from the current state of research in the field of service robotics with 14 accompanying research questions forming the basis of a research agenda. The themes presented are as follows: Theme 1: Employees have a forgotten “dual role”; Theme 2: The influence of groups is neglected; Theme 3: Opposing emotions lead to uncertain outcomes; Theme 4: We know how robots influence engagement, but not experience; Theme 5: Trust is necessary but poorly understood; and Theme 6: Bias is contagious: if the human mind is irrational…so too are robot minds.

Practical Implications – Practically, this research provides guidance for researchers and practitioners alike regarding the current state of research, gaps, and future directions. Importantly for practitioners, it sheds light on themes in the use of AI and robotics in services, highlighting opportunities to consider the dual role of the employee, examines how incorporating a service robot influences all levels of the organization, addresses motivational conflicts for employees and customers, explores how service robots influence the whole customer experience and how trust is formed, and how we are (often inadvertently) creating biased robots.

Details

Emotions and Service in the Digital Age
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-260-2

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Article
Publication date: 2 October 2020

Lewen Wei and Nahyun Kim

The study sought to explore how people's negative emotions change in a crisis situation when they get to know about the crisis and the corporate's socially responsible…

Abstract

Purpose

The study sought to explore how people's negative emotions change in a crisis situation when they get to know about the crisis and the corporate's socially responsible activities after crisis.

Design/methodology/approach

A 2 (crisis type: human error vs organization misdeed) × 2 (CSR fit: low vs high) × 3 (motive disclosure: no disclosure vs company-oriented disclosure vs society-oriented disclosure) between-subjects experiment was conducted online.

Findings

More anger was elicited toward organizational misdeed than human error from both within-person and between-persons perspectives. When using CSR as postcrisis strategy, within-person analyses revealed that high CSR fit in message helped to attenuate sadness (and potentially anger) to a greater extent than low CSR fit, whereas between-persons analyses did not find significant effects of either CSR fit or motive disclosure.

Originality/value

Our findings demonstrate that situational dynamics in crisis situation constantly influence people's emotional states, suggesting a vertical investigation (e.g. within-individual analysis) of emotions may help both scholars and practitioners better understand the nature of crisis emotions and provide fresh insights on how to cope with them.

Details

Corporate Communications: An International Journal, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-3289

Keywords

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