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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1990

William J Bowen

Compares in‐house with university sponsored managementdevelopment/education programmes. Provides points to consider whenselecting an out‐of‐company or designing a company‐specific…

264

Abstract

Compares in‐house with university sponsored management development/education programmes. Provides points to consider when selecting an out‐of‐company or designing a company‐specific executive education programme. Concludes that in‐house programmes provide an organisational approach while university‐sponsored programmes are geared to individual development.

Details

Executive Development, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-3230

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 1993

William J. Bowen

In 1989, Reynolds and Reynolds ($600 million; Dayton, Ohio;business forms and computer software company) launched an executiveeducation programme which has achieved excellent…

479

Abstract

In 1989, Reynolds and Reynolds ($600 million; Dayton, Ohio; business forms and computer software company) launched an executive education programme which has achieved excellent results. Being a family controlled organization for a number of years, the new CEO saw the need to clarify the strategic direction of the business, refocus and reorganize the management team and unleash his executive talent. Through a series of internal education sessions, Reynolds and Reynolds′ strategic plan was examined, marketing approaches changed, leadership expectations defined, succession plans enacted, and the financial aspects of the business emphasized to all employees. It is claimed that almost every Reynolds and Reynolds employee has felt the changes in his/her job. The financial markets have seen the change as well. In October 1989, Reynolds and Reynolds was selling for approximately $11 per share (PE Ratio: 8); the March 1993 quote is over $60 (PE Ratio: 18).

Details

Executive Development, vol. 6 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-3230

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Article
Publication date: 16 June 2021

Fernando de Oliveira Santini, Wagner Junior Ladeira, Marlon Dalmoro and Celso Augusto de Matos

This study aims to consolidate finds about corporate social responsibility (CSR) by conducting a meta-analysis. CSR is a topic present in both academic and practitioner…

1379

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to consolidate finds about corporate social responsibility (CSR) by conducting a meta-analysis. CSR is a topic present in both academic and practitioner discussions. Research has been conducted in different countries and contexts, using diverse methodological approaches. Consequently, there are different views about CSR and conflicting results.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper conducted a meta-analysis to analyse the constructs that are antecedents and consequences of CSR. This paper has also tested the moderating effects of theoretical, methodological and economic variables. The data analysis involved 66 studies, which generated 385 observations and an accumulated sample of 19,817 respondents.

Findings

The findings indicate that environmental concerns, market orientation and stakeholder pressure are the most relevant CSR antecedents. On the other hand, CSR has the strongest effects on organisational commitment, non-financial performance and customer purchasing intention. Also, firm size and cultural orientation were partially significant moderators on the relationships between organisational commitment, CSR and financial performance.

Originality/value

The meta-analytical approach allows for more accurate effect size estimations for each relationship analysed, as the meta-analytic method jointly evaluates the results produced by a great variety of studies performed in different contexts, making it possible to draw more accurate conclusions.

Details

Journal of Social Marketing, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-6763

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1994

Keith Elliot Greenberg

Executive education is no longer a perk—it's a strategic tool. Corporations are using education to adapt to a changing business scene and to implement new strategic directions.

Abstract

Executive education is no longer a perk—it's a strategic tool. Corporations are using education to adapt to a changing business scene and to implement new strategic directions.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

Book part
Publication date: 8 September 2022

Alex Tabarrok

The Baumol effect follows from simple but deep microeconomic reasoning. All prices are relative prices, so if some goods are getting cheaper, others must be getting more…

Abstract

The Baumol effect follows from simple but deep microeconomic reasoning. All prices are relative prices, so if some goods are getting cheaper, others must be getting more expensive. Simple. But in transferring our attention about the cause of rising prices from stagnating sectors to progressive sectors, the Baumol effect radically changes our understanding of the causes, consequences, and evaluation of rising prices. Even today, the power of the Baumol effect to explain price changes through different time periods and places is underestimated. Throughout his career, Baumol returned to this simple idea many times, making it a key to his thought and his evolving views on long-term economic development.

Details

Research in the History of Economic Thought and Methodology: Including a Symposium on the Work of William J. Baumol: Heterodox Inspirations and Neoclassical Models
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80382-708-7

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Research in the History of Economic Thought and Methodology: Including a Symposium on the Work of William J. Baumol: Heterodox Inspirations and Neoclassical Models
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80382-708-7

Book part
Publication date: 8 September 2022

Magnus Henrekson and Mikael Stenkula

William J. Baumol was one of the most prolific economists of his generation, analyzing a broad range of central economic issues addressing real problems of the world. In this…

Abstract

William J. Baumol was one of the most prolific economists of his generation, analyzing a broad range of central economic issues addressing real problems of the world. In this essay, we present and critically evaluate Baumol’s research contributions in entrepreneurship economics and point to areas for future research. Baumol contributed an impressive number of important insights, increasing our understanding of entrepreneurship from both a macro and a micro perspective. He also devoted a large part of his writings to discussing public policy, linking his theoretical insights with policy issues in practice. His analyses are rooted in contemporary mainstream neoclassical economics, and one of his main objectives was to integrate the entrepreneur into this tradition. Today, Baumol is best known for his tripartite distinction between productive, unproductive, and destructive entrepreneurship and his associated idea that the institutional framework, “the rules of the game,” will determine how entrepreneurs allocate their time and effort across different – productive or unproductive – activities. An institutional environment that encourages productive entrepreneurship and spontaneous experimentation while disincentivizing unproductive activities becomes, through this insightful lens, the driving force of economic growth. As an economist, Baumol was knowledgeable and well acquainted with earlier scholars and their writings about entrepreneurship. Baumol’s writings were greatly inspired by Joseph Schumpeter’s views on entrepreneurship, and he made several attempts to formalize Schumpeter’s concept of the innovative entrepreneur. Baumol was in all senses an innovative contributor to entrepreneurship economics. His work has inspired the research community of entrepreneurship scholars, but like all great scientists, he also encountered criticism. His effort to integrate entrepreneurship into the mainstream theory of the firm was only partly successful.

Details

Research in the History of Economic Thought and Methodology: Including a Symposium on the Work of William J. Baumol: Heterodox Inspirations and Neoclassical Models
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80382-708-7

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 10 August 2015

Nicholas Hoover Wilson

This paper considers the East India Company’s emergence as a territorial power from the 1760s until the revocation of most of its commercial functions in 1834. While this period…

Abstract

This paper considers the East India Company’s emergence as a territorial power from the 1760s until the revocation of most of its commercial functions in 1834. While this period has been a key episode for historians of the British Empire and of South Asia, social scientists have struggled with the Company’s ambiguous nature. In this paper, I propose that a profitable way to grasp the Company’s transformation is to consider it as a global strategic action field. This perspective clarifies two key processes in the Company’s transition: the enlargement of its territorial possessions; and the increased exposure of its patrimonial network to intervention from British metropolitan politics. To further suggest the utility of this analytic perspective, I synthesize evidence from various sources, including data concerning the East India Court of Directors and the career histories of Company servants in two of its key administrative regions, Bengal and Madras, during this period of transition.

Details

Chartering Capitalism: Organizing Markets, States, and Publics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-093-7

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1901

The Corporation of the City of London are about to appoint a Public Analyst, and by advertisement have invited applications for the post. It is obviously desirable that the person…

Abstract

The Corporation of the City of London are about to appoint a Public Analyst, and by advertisement have invited applications for the post. It is obviously desirable that the person appointed to this office should not only possess the usual professional qualifications, but that he should be a scientific man of high standing and of good repute, whose name would afford a guarantee of thoroughness and reliability in regard to the work entrusted to him, and whose opinion would carry weight and command respect. Far from being of a nature to attract a man of this stamp, the terms and conditions attaching to the office as set forth in the advertisement above referred to are such that no self‐respecting member of the analytical profession, and most certainly no leading member of it, could possibly accept them. It is simply pitiable that the Corporation of the City of London should offer terms, and make conditions in connection with them, which no scientific analyst could agree to without disgracing himself and degrading his profession. The offer of such terms, in fact, amounts to a gross insult to the whole body of members of that profession, and is excusable only—if excusable at all—on the score of utter ignorance as to the character of the work required to be done, and as to the nature of the qualifications and attainments of the scientific experts who are called upon to do it. In the analytical profession, as in every other profession, there are men who, under the pressure of necessity, are compelled to accept almost any remuneration that they can get, and several of these poorer, and therefore weaker, brethren will, of course, become candidates for the City appointment.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Book part
Publication date: 8 September 2022

Jochen Hartwig and Hagen M. Krämer

William Baumol famously introduced the “cost disease” according to which the relative price of services vis-á-vis manufactured goods keeps rising because of a negative…

Abstract

William Baumol famously introduced the “cost disease” according to which the relative price of services vis-á-vis manufactured goods keeps rising because of a negative productivity differential between services and manufacturing industries. Empirical evidence strongly supports the predictions of Baumol’s model of “unbalanced growth” as we show in this article. Baumol was convinced that the cost disease need not have fatal consequences for growing economies as they can afford to earmark ever-higher shares of GDP to pay for services like healthcare and education if the overall “pie” keeps growing. Then, consumption of goods may rise as well even if its share in GDP steadily declines. However, income inequality has surged since the 1980s; and the rising price of vital services means that lower-income strata may be increasingly unable to pay for them. In this article, we develop the nexus between the cost disease and rising income inequality and sketch the ensuing challenges for social policy.

Details

Research in the History of Economic Thought and Methodology: Including a Symposium on the Work of William J. Baumol: Heterodox Inspirations and Neoclassical Models
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80382-708-7

Keywords

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