Search results

1 – 10 of over 142000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 June 1979

Laraine Joyce

In recent years the use of formal, centralised training courses to promote the development of managers has been criticised by people such as Alistair Mant, Reginald Revans…

Abstract

In recent years the use of formal, centralised training courses to promote the development of managers has been criticised by people such as Alistair Mant, Reginald Revans and Hawdon Hague. Mant calls for a drastic reappraisal of management education and training. He argues that, unless a coherent theory of management action and learning is developed, little real progress can be made. Revans advocates project‐based or action learning as an alternative to training courses, whilst Hague sees the individual coaching of managers as another possible solution to the problem of management training.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 3 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 September 1990

Garrett J. Endres and Brian H. Kleiner

Successfully measuring effectiveness in management training anddevelopment can be a difficult task. Design of a valid measurementprogramme should include evaluation in key…

Downloads
3975

Abstract

Successfully measuring effectiveness in management training and development can be a difficult task. Design of a valid measurement programme should include evaluation in key areas; including emotional reaction and knowledge gain measured after training interventions. Behavioural change and organisational impact measurements should be used on a longer time horizon to evaluate the progress and currency of the management development programme. Finally, research shows that maintaining a balance of the above measurements is the final key to success in measuring the effectiveness of management training and development.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 14 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 May 1987

James F. Bolt

A recent survey of major American firms confirms that the trend to increased management training is gaining momentum. Courses relating to strategic planning and…

Abstract

A recent survey of major American firms confirms that the trend to increased management training is gaining momentum. Courses relating to strategic planning and implementation, particularly with regard to productivity and competitiveness, are increasing, and more courses are customised to company needs. Monitoring and measuring results are also more important. Training executives will have a higher profile in the corporate structure.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 6 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2005

Clinton O. Longenecker and Laurence S. Fink

This paper aims to explore why organizations often focus little attention and resources on management training and provides a useful checklist of ways to close the

Downloads
3255

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore why organizations often focus little attention and resources on management training and provides a useful checklist of ways to close the managerial skills gap through training.

Design/methodology/approach

Seasoned managers (278) in rapidly changing organizations were surveyed on their experiences with management training.

Findings

A content analysis revealed the most frequently cited causes of why organizations fail to properly train their managers.

Research limitations/implications

Generalization of these findings to non‐rapidly changing organizations may be limited.

Practical implications

Results indicate that organizations fail to properly train managers for a host of reasons. Many of failures to train are caused by misconceptions about training needs, the ability of managers to handle their own training or the value of training to the organization compared with other efforts. Lack of accountability and poor implementation are other key reasons cited for training failures.

Originality/value

The findings provide a useful list of the causes for ineffective training and the discussion focuses on ways to close the managerial skills gap.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 37 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 1992

Rajeev D. Sharma

Identifies major causes of the lack of managment training in Indiain order to evolve a viable strategy of management training. Financialconstraint emerged as the single…

Abstract

Identifies major causes of the lack of managment training in India in order to evolve a viable strategy of management training. Financial constraint emerged as the single most critical factor responsible for the lack of management training in India. Discusses environmental conditions conducive to future training along with non‐trainers′ perceptions of the importance and benefits of skills. Finally, discusses the role Government can play in bringing non‐training organizations into the training fold.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 February 1986

Jerry L. Gray

Through better participant selection, organisations can make better use of their management training budget. Companies often waste money by training the wrong type of…

Abstract

Through better participant selection, organisations can make better use of their management training budget. Companies often waste money by training the wrong type of person or by not preparing them properly prior to training. A management development plan should be used to identify suitable individuals for training and the type of training needed. The performance problems of existing managers should be diagnosed to distinguish between ability and motivation problems. There should be increasing managerial accountability for proper participant selection. The participant's manager should support his participant by following up his efforts to implement the training. Participant accountability should be implemented as recognition of their having gained something from the management training programme. As a result of these strategies, programmes will be more effective from the trainer's and organisation's perspective. Participants will be more motivated and committed to developing themselves as managers.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 February 1996

Pauline Amos‐Wilson

A survey of 21 UK NGOs identified a number of interesting issues associated with management training activities within them. These issues include a dissatisfaction with…

Downloads
1364

Abstract

A survey of 21 UK NGOs identified a number of interesting issues associated with management training activities within them. These issues include a dissatisfaction with management training, the mis‐match between stated organizational training needs and what training was in fact engaged in, the apparent lack both of a systematic approach to management training, or of learning from approaches to training in other sectors, and the role of evaluation. These findings lead to the observation that perhaps the purpose of management training within NGOs needs to be assessed within the framework of the donating public’s image of the sector.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 January 2005

Clinton O. Longenecker and Laurence S. Fink

This paper explores the benefits of effective management training and consequences of ineffective training programs.

Downloads
3805

Abstract

Purpose

This paper explores the benefits of effective management training and consequences of ineffective training programs.

Design/methodology/approach

Seasoned managers (278) working in rapidly changing organizations were surveyed on issues related to management training.

Findings

Content analyses revealed a number of specific benefits associated with management training. Conversely, managers identified a series of problems caused by ineffective management training.

Research limitations/implications

Generalization of these findings to non‐rapidly changing organizations is unclear.

Practical implications

Findings suggest that the effectiveness of management training has a significant impact on managerial and organizational performance.

Originality/value

This paper voices the concerns and observations about managerial training from seasoned managers in rapidly changing organizations.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 37 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 April 1980

Clive Smith

The UK foundry industry employs more people in management and supervision than any other skilled occupation. Almost one in three of these managers will have reached…

Abstract

The UK foundry industry employs more people in management and supervision than any other skilled occupation. Almost one in three of these managers will have reached retirement age within the next ten years. If the industry hopes to recruit its future management from amongst its technologists and technicians there are not enough young people entering these occupations to provide an adequate supply of managers to replace those retiring. Very few managers and supervisors receive any training prior to their appointment into management. The development of new technology, the introduction of more and more legislation, the need to survive in a depressed and increasingly competitive market, the demand from customers for higher quality castings, the need to continue investment and modernisation at a time of high interest rates are just some of the factors which make the job of managing increasingly complex and time consuming.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 1 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 July 1991

Hamid S. Atiyyah

A review of relevant literature shows that the effectiveness ofmanagement training in Arab countries is generally estimated to be low.It is argued that improving this…

Abstract

A review of relevant literature shows that the effectiveness of management training in Arab countries is generally estimated to be low. It is argued that improving this effectiveness is impeded by negative attitudes towards training among Arab managers. While some of these attitudes are found to have cultural or bureaucratic origins, low training effectiveness may itself generate and sustain such attitudes. Some of the factors explaining this low effectiveness are: lack of rigorous need assessment, deficiencies in programme design and evaluation, excessive reliance on conventional techniques, inadequate training materials and the shortage of qualified trainers. Measures to rectify this situation are also recommended.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 10 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 142000