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Article
Publication date: 17 November 2022

Musa Nyathi and Ray Kekwaletswe

The purpose of this paper is to examine the mediating effect of employee job satisfaction on the relationship between electronic human resource management (e-HRM) use and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the mediating effect of employee job satisfaction on the relationship between electronic human resource management (e-HRM) use and e-HRM macro-level consequences.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected through a survey involving 32 organizations, using e-HRM applications. A purposive sampling technique was employed. A structural equation modeling technique with the use of the process macro approach was used to analyze collected data.

Findings

E-HRM use has a positive and significant effect on e-HRM macro-level consequences and constituent elements of e-HRM operational, relational and transactional consequences. Employee job satisfaction partially mediates the relationship between e-HRM use and e-HRM macro-level consequences.

Practical implications

The use of e-HRM, complemented by human resource best practices, enhances employee job satisfaction. At an indirect level, job satisfaction partially mediates the effect of e-HRM use on e-HRM macro-level consequences. Organizations should invest in job satisfaction-enhancing practices to ensure attainment of intended organization-wide consequences on a more consistent basis.

Originality/value

The study broadens the scope through which the association between e-HRM use, e-HRM macro-level consequences and employee job satisfaction are viewed. The study illustrates the limitations of the deterministic view of e-HRM use, while supporting the assumptions of the moderate determinism approach, which pin the success of e-HRM systems on the performance and satisfaction of e-HRM actors. The level of employee job satisfaction mediates the relationship between e-HRM use and e-HRM macro-level consequences. The study, to the authors' knowledge, is the first in establishing such an effect.

Details

African Journal of Economic and Management Studies, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-0705

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 November 2022

Katelyn A. Golladay and Jamie A. Snyder

This study expands the empirical understanding of financial fraud victims and the consequences that emerge as a result of financial fraud victimization. In addition, this…

Abstract

Purpose

This study expands the empirical understanding of financial fraud victims and the consequences that emerge as a result of financial fraud victimization. In addition, this study aims to assess the impact of the unique role victims play in financial fraud and the impact self-identifying as a victim has on the negative consequences they experience.

Design/methodology/approach

Data from the Supplemental Fraud Survey to the National Crime Victimization Survey are used to assess the negative consequences of financial fraud victimization.

Findings

Results suggest that victims of financial fraud experience increased distress and financial complications following their victimization experience. In addition, self-reported victim status is found to significantly increase a respondent’s likelihood of reporting emotional distress and financial complications. Implications for research, theory and policy are discussed.

Originality/value

While empirical studies on the consequences of identity theft victimization have been increasing in recent years, financial fraud victimization remains understudied. Given the victim involvement in financial fraud, the consideration of financial fraud independent of identity theft fraud is vital.

Details

Journal of Financial Crime, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-0790

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 26 October 2021

Daniel A. Newark and Markus C. Becker

The logic of consequences and the logic of appropriateness have long been central to understanding behavior in organizations. However, scholarly work on the logic of…

Abstract

The logic of consequences and the logic of appropriateness have long been central to understanding behavior in organizations. However, scholarly work on the logic of appropriateness has consisted mostly of conceptual clarification and ex post explanation of observed behavior. In an effort to facilitate the study of the logic of appropriateness through experimental methods, this paper introduces an experimental paradigm that allows for the manipulation of decision logic as an independent variable. Using this paradigm, 710 participants played four iconic behavioral games in which profitability and ethics are both at play and, sometimes, at odds: Prisoners’ Dilemma, Dictator Game, Ultimatum Game, and Trust Game. The manipulation generated behavioral data, as well as qualitative data about participants’ considerations while deciding according to each logic. The behavioral data show that, compared to participants employing a logic of consequences, participants employing a logic of appropriateness rejected more unfair offers in an Ultimatum Game and were more generous when reciprocating trusting behavior in a Trust Game. In all other cases, behavior between the two logics was not significantly different. An analysis of the qualitative data suggests that a logic of consequences increased participants’ focus on monetary concerns, whereas a logic of appropriateness increased participants’ focus on moral concerns. Taken together, these data provide new insights into when, how, and why the two logics result in behavioral and cognitive differences. The authors conclude by considering directions for future research that they see as particularly amenable to study using the experimental manipulation presented here.

Details

Carnegie goes to California: Advancing and Celebrating the Work of James G. March
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-979-5

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 23 August 2021

Mohammad Nurunnabi

The objective of this study aims at reviewing a synthesis of the economic impact of the implementation of International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) in an attempt…

Abstract

The objective of this study aims at reviewing a synthesis of the economic impact of the implementation of International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) in an attempt to provide directions for future research. There are significant evidences of adopting a high-quality set of harmonised accounting standards (i.e. IFRS) fosters trade and foreign direct investment (FDI), financial transparency, and comparability and reduces information asymmetries. From the extensive structured review of literature using the Scopus database tool, the study reviewed 108 articles, and in particular, the topic-related 41 articles were analysed. Seven journals contribute to 39% of the articles (The Accounting Review; European Accounting Review; International Journal of Accounting; Journal of Accounting Research; Revista Espanola de Financiacion y Contabilidad; Asian Review of Accounting; and International Journal of Economics and Management). However, most of the cited journals were Journal of Accounting Research, The Accounting Review, European Accounting Review, and International Journal of Accounting (Armstrong, Barth, Jagolinzer, & Riedl, 2010; Brüggemann, Hitz, & Sellhorn, 2013; Christensen, Lee, & Walker, 2007; Daske, Hail, Leuz, & Verdi, 2008, 2013). Most of the studies did not use any theory, and most of the articles utilised quantitative approach. The study calls for future research on the theoretical impactions on the economic impact of IFRS implementation in a country-specific study, cross-country study, and global study. Future studies should also focus on the policymaking agenda for the local and international standard setters.

Details

International Financial Reporting Standards Implementation: A Global Experience
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80117-440-4

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 April 2022

Keith S. Jones, Natalie R. Lodinger, Benjamin P. Widlus, Akbar Siami Namin, Emily Maw and Miriam E. Armstrong

Nonexperts do not always follow the advice in cybersecurity warning messages. To increase compliance, it is recommended that warning messages use nontechnical language…

Abstract

Purpose

Nonexperts do not always follow the advice in cybersecurity warning messages. To increase compliance, it is recommended that warning messages use nontechnical language, describe how the cyberattack will affect the user personally and do so in a way that aligns with how the user thinks about cyberattacks. Implementing those recommendations requires an understanding of how nonexperts think about cyberattack consequences. Unfortunately, research has yet to reveal nonexperts’ thinking about cyberattack consequences. Toward that end, the purpose of this study was to examine how nonexperts think about cyberattack consequences.

Design/methodology/approach

Nonexperts sorted cyberattack consequences based on perceived similarity and labeled each group based on the reason those grouped consequences were perceived to be similar. Participants’ labels were analyzed to understand the general themes and the specific features that are present in nonexperts’ thinking.

Findings

The results suggested participants mainly thought about cyberattack consequences in terms of what the attacker is doing and what will be affected. Further, the results suggested participants thought about certain aspects of the consequences in concrete terms and other aspects of the consequences in general terms.

Originality/value

This research illuminates how nonexperts think about cyberattack consequences. This paper also reveals what aspects of nonexperts’ thinking are more or less concrete and identifies specific terminology that can be used to describe aspects that fall into each case. Such information allows one to align warning messages to nonexperts’ thinking in more nuanced ways than would otherwise be possible.

Details

Information & Computer Security, vol. 30 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4961

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 November 2021

Mohamed Attia and Jyoti K. Sinha

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the reliability of the quantitative risk model used for planning inspection and maintenance activities. The objective is to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the reliability of the quantitative risk model used for planning inspection and maintenance activities. The objective is to critically discuss the factors that contribute to the probability and consequence of failure calculations.

Design/methodology/approach

The case study conducted using one of the most widely deployed risk models in the oil and gas industry where a full assessment was performed on an offshore gas producing platform.

Findings

The generic failure frequencies used as the basis for calculating the probability of failure are set at a value representative of the refining and petrochemical industry's failure data. This failure database does not cover offshore. The critical discussion indicated the lack of basis of the coefficient of variances, prior probabilities and conditional probabilities. Moreover, the risk model does not address the distribution of thickness measurements, corrosion rates and inspection effectiveness, whereas only overall deterministic values are used; this requires judgment to determine these values. Probabilities of ignition, probabilities of delayed ignition and other probabilities in Level 1 event tree are found selected based on expert judgment for each of the reference fluids and release types (i.e. continuous or instantaneous). These probabilities are constant and independent of the release rate or mass and lack of constructed model. Defining the release type is critical in the consequence of the failure methodology, whereas the calculated consequences differ greatly depending on the type of release, i.e. continuous or instantaneous. The assessment results show that both criteria of defining the type of release, i.e. continuous or instantaneous, do not affect the calculations of flammable consequences when the auto-ignition likely is zero at the storage temperature. While, the difference in the resulted toxic consequence was more than 31 times between the two criteria of defining the type of release.

Research limitations/implications

There is a need to revamp this quantitative risk model to minimize the subjectivity in the risk calculation and to address the unique design features of offshore platforms.

Originality/value

This case study critically discuss the risk model being widely applied in the O&G industry and demonstrates to the end-users the subjectivity in the risk results. Hence, be vigilant when establishing the risk tolerance/target for the purpose of inspection and maintenance planning.

Details

Journal of Quality in Maintenance Engineering, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2511

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 20 October 2022

Musa Nyathi

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the mediating role of perceived organizational politics on the relationship between electronic human resource management…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the mediating role of perceived organizational politics on the relationship between electronic human resource management (e-HRM) use and e-HRM macro-level consequences.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses a cross-sectional survey of HR professionals, line managers and information technology specialists. A purposive stratified sampling technique is employed. The analyses of data make use of regression and process macro in SPSS analysis.

Findings

The effect of e-HRM use on e-HRM macro-level consequences is partially mediated by perceived organizational politics.

Practical implications

Organizations can invest in e-HRM use alongside other HR practices such as, emotional intelligence training, to reduce the negative effects of perceived organizational politics and in the process enhance employee attitudes and performance.

Originality/value

The study enriches the scope through which the interaction between e-HRM use and perceived organizational politics is viewed. The study was conducted in Zimbabwe, demonstrating that the indirect effect of e-HRM use on e-HRM macro-level consequences is not limited to developed economies.

Details

African Journal of Economic and Management Studies, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-0705

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 July 2021

Alan M. Saks, Jamie A. Gruman and Qian Zhang

Employee engagement has received a considerable amount of research attention over the last decade. However, most of the research has been on job or work engagement. Much…

1006

Abstract

Purpose

Employee engagement has received a considerable amount of research attention over the last decade. However, most of the research has been on job or work engagement. Much less attention has been given to organization engagement, which is a distinct but related target of employee engagement. In this paper, we review the research on organization engagement and identify how it has been measured, its antecedents and consequences and how it compares to job engagement.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper provides a narrative review of 40 studies that have measured organization engagement. Most of these studies have been published in the last five years, and they come from 20 different countries. The majority of studies also measured job or work engagement.

Findings

Most studies used Saks' (2006) measure of organization engagement. Many antecedents have been found to be related to organization engagement; however, those most often studied and consistently related to organization engagement are organizational-related resources such as perceived organizational support (POS), justice perceptions, corporate social responsibility (CSR), organizational structural factors, organizational climate and HR practices. Organization engagement has been found to be positively related to job satisfaction, organizational commitment, organizational citizenship behavior (OCB), job performance and organizational performance and negatively related to intention to quit. Organization engagement has also been found to partially or fully mediate the relationship between antecedents and consequences. In comparison to job engagement, organization engagement scores tend to be lower, and there are meaningful differences in the antecedents and consequences of organization engagement and job engagement. A number of studies found that organization engagement was more strongly related to several of the consequences than job engagement.

Practical implications

The results of this review indicate that organization engagement is as important if not more important than job engagement when it comes to its relationship to some of the consequences of employee engagement. Organizations should include a measure of organization engagement in employee surveys and focus on improving organization engagement by providing a supportive work environment, ensuring that employees have positive perceptions of justice, increasing CSR initiatives, providing a variety of human resources (HR) practices and improving organizational climate.

Originality/value

This paper provides the first comprehensive review of research on organization engagement and offers a new model of the antecedents and consequences of organization engagement and compares organization engagement to job engagement.

Details

Journal of Organizational Effectiveness: People and Performance, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2051-6614

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 September 2022

Berihu Asgele Siyum

The purpose of this study was to examine the antecedents and consequences of burnout among the Ethiopian Civil Service University and Kotebe Metropolitan University…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to examine the antecedents and consequences of burnout among the Ethiopian Civil Service University and Kotebe Metropolitan University instructors in Ethiopia.

Design/methodology/approach

The study employed purely quantitative research and then used a cross-sectional survey design. Therefore, questionnaires adopted from the Maslach Burnout Inventory were collected from 158 university instructors.

Findings

The antecedents of burnout were a job, organizational and individual characteristics, whereas the consequences of burnout were job satisfaction, affective commitment and turnover intention. Work experience, educational status, job characteristics, organizational support and reward and recognition were reported as primary sources of burnout among instructors. Therefore, all the identified antecedents were correlated with burnout. Besides, turnover intention and affective commitment were the major consequences of burnout. Burnout partially mediated the relationship between the antecedents and consequences. Therefore, the antecedents directly impact burnout, but they also indirectly affect the consequences through burnout.

Research limitations/implications

This study has a narrow geographical scope and is limited to a cross-sectional design. Therefore, a longitudinal study representing a large number of universities using mixed research is required to generalize about instructors' burnout in Ethiopia.

Practical implications

This study helps to familiarize scholars, universities and researchers with instructors' burnout in Ethiopia. More specifically, the results of this study help the Ethiopian Civil Service University and Kotebe Metropolitan University to recognize the antecedents and consequences of burnout among their instructors and help them take corrective measures to address the problems of their employees as well as to improve efficiency and quality of education to the community through eliminating the antecedents.

Originality/value

This study gives a better understanding of burnout and becomes good literature on the magnitude and relationship of the antecedents and consequences of burnout among university instructors in Ethiopia. Thus, it provides a conceptual basement for research on university instructors' burnout in Ethiopia.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 August 2010

Alireza Ahmadi, Peter Söderholm and Uday Kumar

The purpose of this paper is to present issues and challenges of scheduled maintenance task development within the maintenance review board (MRB) process, and to find…

3027

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present issues and challenges of scheduled maintenance task development within the maintenance review board (MRB) process, and to find potential areas of improvement in the application of the MSG‐3 methodology for aircraft systems.

Design/methodology/approach

The issues and challenges as well as potential areas of improvement have been identified through a constructive review that consists of two parts. The first part is a benchmarking between the Maintenance Steering Group (MSG‐3) methodology and other established and documented versions of reliability‐centred maintenance (RCM). This benchmarking focuses on the MSG‐3 methodology and compares it with some RCM standards to identify differences and thereby find ways to facilitate the application of MSG‐3. The second part includes a discussion about methodologies and tools that can support different steps of the MSG‐3 methodology within the framework of the MRB process.

Findings

The MSG‐3 methodology is closely related to the RCM methodology, in which the anticipated consequences of failure are considered for risk evaluation. However, MSG‐3 considers neither environmental effects of failures nor operational consequences of hidden failures. Furthermore, in MSG‐3, the operational check (failure‐finding inspection) is given priority before all other tasks, whereas in RCM it is considered as a default action, where there is no other applicable and effective option. While RCM allows cost‐effectiveness analysis for all failures that have no safety consequences, MSG‐3 just allows it for failures with economic consequences. A maintenance program that is established through the MRB process fulfils the requirements of continuous airworthiness, but there is no foundation to claim that it is the optimal or the most effective program from an operator's point‐of‐view. The major challenge when striving to achieve a more effective maintenance program within the MRB process is to acquire supporting methodologies and tools for adequate risk analysis, for optimal interval assignments, and for selection of the most effective maintenance task.

Originality/value

The paper presents a critical review of existing aircraft scheduled maintenance program development methodologies, and demonstrates the differences between MSG‐3 and other RCM methodologies.

Details

Journal of Quality in Maintenance Engineering, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2511

Keywords

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