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Article
Publication date: 16 August 2013

Xiao‐Yu Liu and Jun Liu

Western research on teams has paid an increasing attention to team's emotional process and corresponding outcomes. However, there were seldom studies examining the…

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3011

Abstract

Purpose

Western research on teams has paid an increasing attention to team's emotional process and corresponding outcomes. However, there were seldom studies examining the influence mechanism of team leader emotional intelligence on subordinate outcomes in teams, and the previous studies often neglected the team context. The aim of the study is to explore the cross‐level effect of team leader emotional intelligence and team emotional climate on team member job satisfaction.

Design/methodology/approach

Questionnaire survey on 148 team leaders and 840 team members was conducted. The paper applied hierarchical linear modeling analyses with the software HLM 6.06 to test the hypotheses.

Findings

The analyses on the matched sample showed that team negative emotional climate has negative effect on team member job satisfaction, and team emotional climate moderates the relationship between leader emotional intelligence and team member job satisfaction such that leader emotional intelligence has stronger effect on member job satisfaction as team emotional climate becomes more negative.

Research limitations/implications

First, it is a single time period study and cross‐sectional research design, which limits our ability to make causal inferences about the relationships proposed. Second, team leader emotional intelligence was reported by team leader themselves, and it will be better to combine self‐report and other‐report measures of emotional intelligence in the future study.

Originality/value

This study extends the existing theory through a cross‐level framework that examines how team emotional climate interacts with team leader emotional intelligence to affect member job satisfaction, thus enriches the studies on emotional intelligence and leadership, team emotional climate and team effectiveness. The study also provides evidence of group‐level emotion in China, a non‐Western cultural country, which enriches the existing body of studies sampling exclusively from Western cultural groups and the research of emotions in organizations at group level.

Details

Nankai Business Review International, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8749

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Publication date: 24 September 2018

Anna Krzeminska, Joel Lim and Charmine E. J. Härtel

Occupational stress occurs in a variety of forms, types, and situations. Arguably, a certain level of stress can encourage productivity, ingenuity, and satisfaction. As…

Abstract

Occupational stress occurs in a variety of forms, types, and situations. Arguably, a certain level of stress can encourage productivity, ingenuity, and satisfaction. As occupational stress escalates, however, people’s capacity to deal with it diminishes, eventually compromising work performance and provoking people to express negative emotions. These negative aspects of stress are buffered to a certain extent by individual differences such as personality as well as external contextual factors such as the working environment. This chapter reports a study applying an affective events theory (AET) as a framework to investigate perceived stress in response to negative events in emergency services’ workplaces and the potential buffering effects of servant leadership, affective team climate, and psychological capital. An experience sampling methodology (ESM) was used to record daily cases of self-reported negative events experienced by participants over the three week data-collection period. A structured survey questionnaire independent of the ESM was also used to collect data from 44 emergency service operation members. The findings indicate that servant leadership behavior, affective team climate, and individual psychological capital all are significantly related to reduced perceived occupational stress in emergency service team members.

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Article
Publication date: 9 March 2010

Nicholas Clarke

This paper aims to identify whether relationships exist between emotional intelligence (EI) and specific teamwork behaviours that are associated with transition, action…

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6446

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to identify whether relationships exist between emotional intelligence (EI) and specific teamwork behaviours that are associated with transition, action and interpersonal team processes using the ability model of EI.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 68 MBA students comprising 13 randomly assigned teams completed a pencil and paper performance‐based test of emotional intelligence. Some 14 weeks later a score reflecting the extent team members engaged in a number of teamwork behaviours consistent with transition, action and interpersonal team processes was obtained from peer ratings.

Findings

Emotional intelligence was found to explain direct and unique variance in transition and interpersonal team processes. However, only three individual branches of EI were found to be of any significance, and these differed in each instance.

Practical implications

These findings add to the growing body of literature suggesting emotional intelligence may be an important aspect of individual difference amongst team members that can contribute to team effectiveness. Individuals with differing EI abilities may be particularly important to teams dependent upon the team's activity phase.

Originality/value

The paper shows that blanket assertions regarding the significance of emotional intelligence for team effectiveness are far too simplistic. Differing EI abilities are associated with particular teamwork behaviours, which in turn become important during different phases of team activity. The findings suggest a need for more sophisticated frameworks regarding how EI relates to specific cognitive, verbal and behavioural teamwork activities.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 16 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

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Article
Publication date: 10 March 2020

Wencang Zhou, Zhu Zhu and Donald Vredenburgh

As teamwork becomes more prevalent in organizational decision-making, the influence of emotional intelligence (EI) on team decision-making process demands more research…

Abstract

Purpose

As teamwork becomes more prevalent in organizational decision-making, the influence of emotional intelligence (EI) on team decision-making process demands more research attention. This study aims to investigate the impact of EI on team psychological safety and decision-making performance.

Design/methodology/approach

Team decision-making performance and decision quality from a team decision task were obtained from 54 decision-making teams composed of 241 undergraduate business students from a Mid-Atlantic university. Regression analyses were used to test individual and team’s EI relationship with team decision performance and the mediation effect of psychological safety.

Findings

This study provides empirical evidence that individual EI is positively related to individual influence on team decisions. Team-level EI improves team decision-making performance through increases in psychological safety.

Research limitations/implications

The sample size is relatively small, and the participants were business students; therefore, the research results may lack generalizability. Future research is encouraged to explore this topic further.

Practical implications

As teamwork becomes more prevalent in organizational decision-making, the influence of EI on team decision-making process demands more research and managerial attention. The findings of this paper provide insights on the importance of individual/team EI and psychological safety in team decision performance.

Originality/value

This study furthers research showing that emotions are pertinent to social interactions, including group decision-making, and therefore suggests the desirability of investigating other social processes affecting group decision-making.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 26 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 7 December 2018

Samia Jamshed and Nauman Majeed

The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationship between team culture and team performance through the mediating role of knowledge sharing and team emotional

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6015

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationship between team culture and team performance through the mediating role of knowledge sharing and team emotional intelligence.

Design/methodology/approach

The study advocated that team culture influences the knowledge sharing behavior of team members and the development of emotional intelligence skill at the team level. Further, it is hypothesized that knowledge sharing and team emotional intelligence positively influence team performance. By adopting a quantitative research design, data were gathered by using a survey questionnaire from 535 respondents representing 95 teams working in private health-care institutions.

Findings

The findings significantly indicated that knowledge sharing and team emotional intelligence influence team working. Furthermore, this study confirms the strong association between team culture and team performance through the lens of knowledge sharing and team emotional intelligence.

Practical implications

This investigation offers observational proof to health-care services to familiarize workers with the ability of emotional intelligence and urge them to share knowledge for enhanced team performance. The study provides in-depth understanding to managers and leaders in health-care institutions to decentralize culture at the team level for endorsement of knowledge sharing behavior.

Originality/value

This is amongst one of the initial studies investigating team members making a pool of knowledge to realize potential gains enormously and influenced by the emotional intelligence. Team culture set a platform to share knowledge which is considered one of the principal execution conduct essential for accomplishing and managing team adequacy in a sensitive health-care environment.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2005

Helena Syna Desivilya and Dana Yagil

The current study aims to identify the factors underlying differing preferences for conflict‐management patterns within work teams. Two major antecedents of dispute…

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3405

Abstract

The current study aims to identify the factors underlying differing preferences for conflict‐management patterns within work teams. Two major antecedents of dispute resolution modes were examined: the team members' emotional reactions to and their perceptions of the type of conflicts encountered in their work group. The sample consisted of 69 medical teams, comprising 331 employees (nurses and physicians) employed in several medical organizations. Self‐report structured questionnaires were used to assess the research variables. A series of regression analyses showed that cooperative (integrating and compromising) patterns of conflict management were associated with positive intragroup emotional states; contentious (dominating) patterns were associated with positive as well as negative emotions; and an avoidance pattern was associated with negative emotions only. Additionally, negative emotions were found to mediate the association of relationship conflict with a dominating pattern of conflict management. The findings point to the centrality of emotional states in determining conflict management preferences at the intragroup level.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2003

L. Melita Prati, Ceasar Douglas, Gerald R. Ferris, Anthony P. Ammeter and M. Ronald Buckley

Prati, Douglas, Ferris, Ammeter, and Buckley (2003) have proposed that emotional intelligence is a critical component in effective team leadership and team outcomes. John…

Abstract

Prati, Douglas, Ferris, Ammeter, and Buckley (2003) have proposed that emotional intelligence is a critical component in effective team leadership and team outcomes. John Antonakis (2003) questioned whether the first claim in this article, that emotional intelligence is critical for effective team leadership, is justified. He presents six questions that illuminate his reservations. In response, the present authors attempt to answer his reservations by clarifying and explicating the reasoning behind this claim.

Details

The International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1055-3185

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Article
Publication date: 17 December 2018

Azadeh Rezvani, Rowena Barrett and Pouria Khosravi

The purpose of the study is to enhance understanding of the relationships among team emotional intelligence (EI), trust in team, conflict in team and team performance.

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5351

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the study is to enhance understanding of the relationships among team emotional intelligence (EI), trust in team, conflict in team and team performance.

Design/methodology/approach

A sample of 389 team members from 84 project teams in large-scale construction projects was surveyed.

Findings

Findings showed that team EI is positively associated with team performance. In addition, trust and conflict in the team mediate the association between team EI and team performance.

Practical implications

The ability to perceive one’s own and others’ emotions significantly increases the likelihood of team performance by increasing trust in a team and reducing conflict. Therefore, managers can use these findings to boost team performance and reduce conflict in their teams.

Originality/value

This research contributes to the better understanding of the relationship between team EI and team performance in large-scale construction projects. In addition, this research is an empirical investigation into the mediation variables linking EI to team performance.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 25 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

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Article
Publication date: 2 November 2012

Oluremi B. Ayoko and Alison M. Konrad

Previous research has shown that diversity is related to both task and relationship conflict in groups. The purpose of this paper is to posit that leadership is an…

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6531

Abstract

Purpose

Previous research has shown that diversity is related to both task and relationship conflict in groups. The purpose of this paper is to posit that leadership is an important factor for maintaining high group performance and morale under conditions of conflict. Specifically, the paper argues that leader conflict management, emotion management, and transformational behaviors determine the impact of conflict on group outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 585 people in 89 workgroups from eight public service organizations in Australia. The authors used hierarchical regression to test the hypotheses regarding group performance and morale. To test mediation and moderation, the authors followed the procedure outlined by Baron and Kenny. Finally, they used the formulas provided by Preacher, Rucker and Hayes to test for moderated mediation.

Findings

Results showed that diversity increased task conflict but was unrelated to relationship conflict. Both task and relationship conflict were negatively associated with group performance and morale, and effective leadership reduced these negative effects to zero. There was also a partial support for the authors’ theoretical model predicting that leadership moderates the indirect effect of diversity on group outcomes occurring through the mediator of conflict.

Research limitations/implications

A greater amount of variation in the diversity of work groups included in the sample would have been useful for overcoming problems of restriction of range, which likely reduced ability to observe an association between diversity and group outcomes. Based on the results, in order to prevent negative emotions from task and relationship conflict from damaging group performance, leaders of diverse groups can act to manage those emotions among their group members. Results from this study implicate conflict management training. While training for conflict management is beyond the scope of this research, further research should examine this issue.

Originality/value

The study extends research in the area of diversity, leadership and group work. In particular, it demonstrates that transformational leadership is an important factor for maintaining high group performance and morale under conditions of conflict. It also offers practical assistance to individuals entrusted with the responsibility of managing culturally diverse workgroups.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. 31 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

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Article
Publication date: 8 April 2014

Walter van den Berg, Petru L. Curseu and Marius T.H. Meeus

– The aim of this paper is to test the moderating role of emotion regulation in the transformation of both task and process conflict into relationship conflict.

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2208

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to test the moderating role of emotion regulation in the transformation of both task and process conflict into relationship conflict.

Design/methodology/approach

A field study of multi-teams systems, in which (94) respondents are engaged in interpersonal and inter-team interactions, was conducted to test the effects of the interaction of emotion regulation and task and process conflict on the emergence of relationship conflict in 23 multi-team client/supplier systems.

Findings

The findings show that when collective emotion regulation strategies are effective, process conflict is less likely to transform into relationship conflict. An emerging finding of this study shows that process conflict mediates the interaction between task conflict and emotion regulation on relationship conflict in multi-team systems.

Research limitations/implications

This study uses a relatively small number of projects and participants: further studies with larger samples are recommended; in addition, longitudinal studies would allow for further testing the effect of team longevity in the emergence of effective emotion regulation strategies.ct transforming into relationship conflicts.

Practical implications

The findings imply that managers of multi-team systems should actively try to stimulate their teams to develop effective emotion regulation strategies as effective emotion regulation mechanisms minimize the risk of process conflict transforming into relationship conflicts.

Originality/value

The paper looks at a real-world (as opposed to lab-situation) environment; it addresses a contingency model of intra-group conflict and tests the transformation of task and process conflicts into relationship conflict taking into account the moderating effect of emotion regulation.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 25 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

Keywords

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