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Article
Publication date: 29 June 2012

Amy McMillan, Hao Chen, Orlando C. Richard and Shahid N. Bhuian

The current study seeks to provide predictions for task conflict in supervisor‐subordinate dyads and to test empirically the mediation effects of task conflict between…

Abstract

Purpose

The current study seeks to provide predictions for task conflict in supervisor‐subordinate dyads and to test empirically the mediation effects of task conflict between organizational culture/subordinate values and subordinate outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

Structural equation modeling was employed to test the theoretical model.

Findings

It was found that task conflict mediates the relationship between a clan culture and intention to quit. Additionally, support was also found for the mediating effect of task conflict on the relationship between individualistic values and intention to quit.

Research limitations/implications

More research is needed to take into consideration the variables influencing task conflict in both vertical and horizontal dyadic relationships. A dynamic view of conflict may further contribute to the existing literature.

Practical implications

More remedies are needed in organizations to foster positive employees' attitudes and wellbeing through the generation of task conflicts. For example, fostering a clan culture instead of a hierarchy may be vital.

Originality/value

The current study demonstrates that organizational culture/subordinate's values may be linked to different subordinate outcomes through task conflict.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 30 October 2009

Louise Kippist and Anneke Fitzgerald

This article aims to examine tensions between hybrid clinician managers' professional values and health care organisations' management objectives.

Abstract

Purpose

This article aims to examine tensions between hybrid clinician managers' professional values and health care organisations' management objectives.

Design/methodology/approach

Data are from interviews conducted with, and observation of, 14 managerial participants in a Cancer Therapy Unit set in a large teaching hospital in New South Wales, Australia, who participated in a Clinical Leadership Development Program.

Findings

The data indicate that there are tensions experienced by members of the health care organisation when a hybrid clinician manager appears to abandon the managerial role for the clinical role. The data also indicate that when a hybrid clinician manager takes on a managerial role other members of the health care organisation are required concomitantly to increase their clinical roles.

Research limitations/implications

Although the research was represented by a small sample and was limited to one department of a health care organisation, it is possible that other members of health care organisations experience similar situations when they work with hybrid clinician managers. Other research supports the findings. Also, this paper reports on data that emerged from a research project that was evaluating a Clinical Leadership Development Program. The research was not specifically focused on organisational professional conflict in health care organisations.

Practical implications

This paper shows that the role of the hybrid clinician manager may not bring with it the organisational effectiveness that the role was perceived to have. Hybrid clinician managers abandoning their managerial role for their clinical role may mean that some managerial work is not done. Increasing the workload of other clinical members of the health care organisation may not be optimal for the health care organisation.

Originality/value

Organisational professional conflict, as a result of hybridity and divergent managerial and clinical objectives, can cause conflict which affects other organisational members and this conflict may have implications for the efficiency of the health care organisation. The extension or duality of organisational professional conflict that causes interpersonal or group conflict in other members of the organisation, to the authors' knowledge, has not yet been researched.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 23 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1991

Hyun O. Lee and Randall G. Rogan

Based on the collectivism‐individualism structure, the present study compared organizational conflict management behaviors between Korea (a collectivistic culture) and the…

Abstract

Based on the collectivism‐individualism structure, the present study compared organizational conflict management behaviors between Korea (a collectivistic culture) and the U.S. (an individualistic culture). Employing a three‐way factorial design (Culture type x Relational distance x Power relationship), the present study registered robust effects of culture type in determining one's organizational conflict management behaviors. Specifically, Koreans are found to be extensive users of solution‐orientation strategies, while Americans prefer to use either non‐confrontation or control strategies in dealing with organizational conflicts. Moreover, the data also indicated that Koreans are more sensitive in exercising power when facing conflicts with subordinates in the organization. On the other hand, the effect of relational distance (ingroup vs. outgroup) in determining one's choice of organizational conflict management styles is found to be minimal. Implications of present findings for future intercultural communication research are also discussed.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

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Article
Publication date: 9 February 2015

Jacob Guinot, Ricardo Chiva and Fermín Mallén

This paper aims to, prompted by a recent paradigm shift in the organizational sciences, to explore some antecedents of organizational learning capability, focusing on…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to, prompted by a recent paradigm shift in the organizational sciences, to explore some antecedents of organizational learning capability, focusing on altruism and relationship conflict.

Design/methodology/approach

To test the hypotheses, the structural equation technique was applied to data from a survey of Spanish firms with recognized excellence in human resource management.

Findings

The results of this research show that, in these firms, altruism facilitates learning capacity both directly and indirectly (through relationship conflict). Relationship conflict is posited as a mediating variable that explains how altruism improves organizational learning.

Research limitations/implications

The limitations of this study include excessive heterogeneity of the sample size and industrial sector and the type of firm included in the sample. Due to the potential benefits that altruism seems to have for organizations, future research could continue to investigate the consequences of altruism in organizations.

Practical implications

Altruism provides organizations with a value that can facilitate organizational learning capability not only directly, but also by reducing relationship conflict. Altruism may offer organizations a tool they can use to improve their success in dealing with the challenges of today’s uncertain and constantly changing economic environment.

Originality/value

This study proposes a common altruistic approach that is far removed from traditional self-interested models in organizational literature. This study identifies altruism and relationship conflict as antecedents of organizational learning capability.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2002

M. Afzalur Rahim

The management of organizational conflict involves the diagnosis of and intervention in affective and substantive conflicts at the interpersonal, intragroup, and…

Abstract

The management of organizational conflict involves the diagnosis of and intervention in affective and substantive conflicts at the interpersonal, intragroup, and intergroup levels and the styles (strategies) used to handle these conflicts. A diagnosis should indicate whether there is need for an intervention and the type of intervention needed. In general, an intervention is designed (a) to attain and maintain a moderate amount of substantive conflict in nonroutine tasks at various levels, (b) to reduce affective conflict at all levels, and (c) to enable the organizational members to select and use the appropriate styles of handling conflict so that various situations can be effectively dealt with. Organizational learning and effectiveness can be enhanced through an appropriate diagnosis of and process and structural interventions in conflict.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

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Article
Publication date: 12 October 2015

Yang Woon Chung

This study aims to examine the mediating effects of organizational conflict on the relationships between workplace ostracism with in-role behavior and organizational

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the mediating effects of organizational conflict on the relationships between workplace ostracism with in-role behavior and organizational citizenship behaviors. The workplace is a social context where many individuals spend a great amount of their time. Frequently being excluded or ignored is a common experience within all social contexts, and the study emphasizes how those feelings can affect organizational members. The current study extends research, as prior empirical studies have focused mainly on the direct consequences of workplace ostracism.

Design/methodology/approach

The study was longitudinally designed, as data were collected using a two-wave self-reported survey. Confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modeling were conducted to test the study’s hypotheses.

Findings

The study found workplace ostracism to be positively related to coworker conflict, supervisor conflict and task conflict. Coworker conflict was found to fully mediate the relationships between workplace ostracism with in-role behavior and organizational citizenship behaviors.

Research limitations/implications

As the study was conducted in Korea, the results cannot be generalizable and should be tested in Western cultures. Although the study was longitudinally designed, the first-wave survey measured the independent variable, while the second-wave survey measured the mediating and dependent variables. Also, self-reported surveys are always of concern; thus, multiple sources should be considered to strengthen the research model’s relationships.

Practical implications

Organizations and managers need to continuously address the quality of interpersonal relationships among all organizational members. As studies reveal that being “out of the loop” is quite a common phenomenon, individual and organizational performance can be greatly affected, as work is becoming more interdependent and team work is frequently implemented within organizations.

Social implications

Individuals interact in numerous social contexts and as the workplace is an important context where many individuals spend a lot of their time and interact with other organizational members, the quality of the relationships at work can have spillover effects that can affect interpersonal relationships outside of the workplace.

Originality/value

The study explores and empirically tests the mediating effects of organizational conflict on the relationships between workplace ostracism with in-role behavior and organizational citizenship behaviors. The study extends research on the consequences of workplace ostracism and helps further understand how workplace ostracism can affect workplace attitudes and behaviors.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 26 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 26 March 2021

Mahmud Akhter Shareef, Yogesh Dwivedi, Jashim Uddin Ahmed, Uma Kumar and Rafeed Mahmud

This paper aims to address procurement, logistics management, inventory control and distribution of perishable items, i.e. vegetables, fruits, flowers and fishes, during…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to address procurement, logistics management, inventory control and distribution of perishable items, i.e. vegetables, fruits, flowers and fishes, during the social isolation period of the Covid-19 era to identify conflicting interests among the channel members; present inventory and information sharing scenario; and reveal organizational dispute and existence of redundant, nonessential and corrupted members in the supply chain.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses an exploratory investigation to evaluate the relations among the members of the supply chain of perishable food items. In this context, it is designed to investigate the field, observe the members of the existing supply chain from rural and remote places and capture their interviews to accomplish the objectives.

Findings

This study identified that although the supply chain of perishable food items is controlled truly by private parties, from a realistic view, the private–public partnership is essential where the government should play the coordinating role. In this context, continuous interaction, coordination and information sharing among the members to establish an optimum and scalable network and remove any redundant nodal points is a key success factor for managing an efficient supply chain.

Research limitations/implications

Theoretical and managerial implication of this research is enormous. The existence of functional and dysfunctional conflicts in the same supply network and how it can be detrimental to the performance of the members are exposed in this study, which can be an excellent source to be investigated. Practitioners and researchers can gain a greater understanding to identify the root causes of conflicts in the existing structural dynamics, shedding light on organizational interactions, power and group behavior during the Covid-19 era.

Originality/value

From the light of management and inter-organizational conflicts, this is a pioneer study that has detected the redundant channel members, their source of power and how their removal can present an optimum channel with group coherence and synergistic interest.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2002

William E. Shafer, L. Jane Park and Woody M. Liao

This study examines the relationships among professionalism, organizational‐ professional conflict and various work outcomes for a sample of Certified Management…

Abstract

This study examines the relationships among professionalism, organizational‐ professional conflict and various work outcomes for a sample of Certified Management Accountants. We assessed professionalism using Hall’s Professionalism Scale, and tested the relationships among professionalism, organizational‐professional conflict, organizational commitment, job satisfaction and turnover intentions using a structural equations model. The results indicate that two dimensions of professionalism (dedication to the profession and autonomy demands) were positively associated with perceptions of organizational‐professional conflict. As hypothesized, individuals who perceived higher levels of organizational‐professional conflict were less committed to the organization, had lower levels of job satisfaction and also had higher turnover intentions.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 17 July 2017

Babak Panahi, Elena Moezzi, Christopher Nigel Preece and Wan Normeza Wan Zakaria

The possible effect of conflicts as the consequence of differences between personal and organizational values (OV) on organizational commitment (OC) of internal…

Abstract

Purpose

The possible effect of conflicts as the consequence of differences between personal and organizational values (OV) on organizational commitment (OC) of internal construction stakeholders was an unclear issue in the areas of organizational behaviour in the construction industry, especially in Malaysia. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to focus on this issue in the Malaysian construction industry.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper targeted professional project consultants, who are identified as architects, engineers, and quantity surveyors, as the internal construction stakeholders. The personal-OV and the level of OC of the stakeholders were evaluated through a questionnaire survey. To achieve the research objective, comparative and hierarchical regression analyses were performed.

Findings

The results generated by the analyses indicated a high level of value conflicts in the construction organizations which significantly and negatively affected commitment of the internal stakeholders.

Originality/value

Value conflicts in construction organizations are the agenda of this paper while not many empirical studies have been conducted on this issue in Malaysia. This paper through investigating the potential effect of value conflicts on the stakeholders’ commitment reveals the importance of interaction between personal and OV in construction organizations which contributes to the extant literature of organizational behaviour as to the construction literature.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 13 February 2017

Nan Hu, Zhi Chen, Jibao Gu, Shenglan Huang and Hefu Liu

This paper aims to examine the effects of task and relationship conflicts on team creativity, and the moderating role of shared leadership in inter-organizational teams…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the effects of task and relationship conflicts on team creativity, and the moderating role of shared leadership in inter-organizational teams. An inter-organizational team normally comprises employees from collaborated organizations brought together to conduct an initiative, such as product development. Practitioners and researchers have witnessed the prevalence of conflict in inter-organizational teams. Despite significant scholarly investigation into the importance of conflict in creativity, a deep theoretical understanding of conflict framework remains elusive.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire survey was conducted in China to collect data. Consequently, 54 teams, which comprised 54 team managers and 276 team members, were deemed useful for the study.

Findings

By testing our hypotheses on 54 inter-organizational teams, we found that relationship conflict has a negative relationship with team creativity, whereas task conflict has an inverted U-shaped (curvilinear) relationship with team creativity. Furthermore, when shared leadership is stronger, the negative relationship with team creativity is weaker for relationship conflict, whereas the inverted U-shaped relationship with team creativity is stronger for task conflict.

Research limitations/implications

The main limitation is cross-sectional, which cannot establish causality in relationships. Despite this potential weakness, the present research provides insights into conflict, leadership and inter-organizational collaboration literature.

Practical implications

The findings of this study offer some guidance on how managers can intervene in the conflict situations of inter-organizational teams.

Social implications

Managers are struggling to identify ways to effectively manage team conflict when a team of diverse individuals across organizational boundaries are brought together to solve a problem. The findings of this study offer some guidance on how managers can intervene in the conflict situations of inter-organizational teams.

Originality/value

This paper provides understandings about how relationship and task conflicts affect team creativity in inter-organizational teams.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

Keywords

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