Search results

1 – 10 of over 21000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 16 July 2021

Upasna A. Agarwal, James Avey and Keke Wu

This study aims to investigate the differential roles of self-esteem and co-rumination in the mediated relationship between abusive supervision and knowledge hiding via…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the differential roles of self-esteem and co-rumination in the mediated relationship between abusive supervision and knowledge hiding via psychological safety.

Design/methodology/approach

The study used a three-wave time-lagged design and data were collected from 388 full-time employees in India.

Findings

The results show that psychological safety mediated the impact abusive supervision had on knowledge hiding. Further, this impact was weakened by higher self-esteem as employees with higher self-esteem were less affected by the impact of abusive supervision on psychological safety and knowledge hiding; but this impact was amplified by more co-rumination as employees who co-ruminated more were also more affected by abusive supervision in psychological safety and knowledge hiding.

Research limitations/implications

A cross-sectional design and the use of self-reported questionnaires are a few limitations of this study.

Originality/value

This study took a purposeful deviation from the traditional path of organizational justice to the study of abusive supervision and psychological safety and endeavored an alternate route, one of resource conservation. Further, employees have diverse reasons that heighten or dampen their inclination to hide knowledge from others in the workplace. The study examines co-rumination and self-esteem as possible boundary conditions.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 5 November 2021

Kevin Real, Leanna Hartsough and Lisa C. Huddleston

This chapter examines group communication in medical teams through psychological safety and simulation training research. Research has shown that medical teams are…

Abstract

This chapter examines group communication in medical teams through psychological safety and simulation training research. Research has shown that medical teams are challenged by established hierarchies, power/status differences, temporal stability, changing team memberships, and deeply held beliefs that emphasize individual responsibility. A review of 47 studies (29 psychological safety, 18 simulation) was conducted to understand key findings in relationship to group communication. Results indicate that team leadership promotes team psychological safety, voice, and relationship quality while status differences and hierarchy continue to affect psychological safety within medical teams. Simulation training facilitated interprofessional relationships, attitudes toward teamwork, self-efficacy, and group communication. The findings of this review suggest that psychological safety may be developed through simulation training. The quality of patient care is improved when all members of medical teams have the ability and motivation to communicate effectively.

Details

The Emerald Handbook of Group and Team Communication Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-501-8

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 18 November 2019

Gouri Mohan and Yih-teen Lee

Collective global leadership requires team members to attempt to influence as well as accept influence from each other across multiple cultural, linguistic, and national…

Abstract

Collective global leadership requires team members to attempt to influence as well as accept influence from each other across multiple cultural, linguistic, and national boundaries, which is affected by the extent to which team members perceive the team as being safe for interpersonal risk-taking or the level of psychological safety in the team. The higher levels of collective leadership can, in turn, enhance the perceived psychological safety, and thereby create more positive outcomes for the team. This reciprocal relationship may be influenced by changes in team dynamics across the different stages of a team lifecycle. Using an inductive longitudinal study of 76 teams for nine months, we uncover the time-variant mutually reinforcing relationship between collective global leadership and team psychological safety. Our results show that the strength of this reciprocal relationship varies such that it is absent in the initial stage, becomes prominent in the middle stage, and then remains present, yet somewhat weakened, in the final stage of the team lifecycle. Our results also show that the initial collective leadership patterns in the team positively affect final leadership patterns, and this relationship is mediated by the team’s psychological safety in the middle stage of the team lifecycle. We discuss implications of this study on the theory and practice of global leadership and multinational teams.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 2 December 2020

Wenting Wang, Lirong Jian, Qiuyun Guo, Haitao Zhang and Wenxing Liu

The purpose of this study is to build a link between narcissistic supervision and employees' change-oriented organizational citizenship behaviors (OCBs). On the basis of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to build a link between narcissistic supervision and employees' change-oriented organizational citizenship behaviors (OCBs). On the basis of the social dynamics of state paranoia theory, the study examines the relationship between narcissistic supervision and employees' change-oriented OCBs, and explores how this relationship is mediated by psychological safety and affective organizational commitment.

Design/methodology/approach

Using data collected from a sample of 183 employee–leader dyads from a technology company in China, the study examines the mediating effects of psychological safety and affective organizational commitment on the relationship between narcissistic supervision and employees' change-oriented OCBs. Structural equation modeling is used to analyze the data.

Findings

The results indicate that narcissistic supervision has a negative effect on psychological safety and affective organizational commitment; psychological safety mediates the relationship between narcissistic supervision and affective organizational commitment; and affective organizational commitment mediates the relationship between psychological safety and employees' change-oriented OCBs. The results also show that the negative effect of narcissistic supervision on employees' change-oriented OCBs is mediated by psychological safety and subsequently affective organizational commitment.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the literature by linking narcissistic supervision and employees' change-oriented OCBs and suggesting that psychological safety and affective organizational commitment are two critical mediators of this relationship. This study not only advances research on the “dark side” of narcissistic supervision, but also sheds light on the underlying mechanism of narcissistic supervision and employees' change-oriented OCBs from the psychological and emotional perspectives.

Content available
Article
Publication date: 9 February 2021

Helena Lee

The purpose of the study is to investigate the psychological safety, organisation support and emotion in the workplace during the transition from office to home working…

Downloads
5290

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the study is to investigate the psychological safety, organisation support and emotion in the workplace during the transition from office to home working during the COVID-19 pandemic crisis. Past studies on emotion in the workplace mostly focus on types of discreet emotion, in relation to positive and negative emotions (e.g. Connelly and Torrence, 2018; Rubino et al., 2013). Other studies reported that emotions are derived from social comparison processes (Matta and Dyne, 2020). During a crisis, the emotional responses of the workers and organisational support to the different group of employees differ due to the social exchange relationship. Hence, this study contributes to the field of organisational support by examining the organisational support as the investment of both physical and psychological resources, and the emotional responses of employees to the COVID-19 pandemic crisis during transition from office to work-from-home setting. Through thick descriptions of the workers' emotion responses to this transition, the research examined how organisational support potentially impacts the worker's experience of psychological safety.

Design/methodology/approach

The study was conducted in the Singapore context. In light of the COVID-19 pandemic, the Singapore Government imposed regulatory restrictions, the “Circuit Breaker” from April 7 2020 to curb the spread of the virus infections. Most workplaces from the public service agencies to the private enterprises implemented work from home arrangements for most of the employees. The data were generated from an online survey that included self-reported text-based narratives in response to open-ended questions. Open-ended questions effectively allowed respondents to define the real-world situation in their perspectives. Salaried workers from both the public and private organisations were invited to take part in this research. Respondents comprise full-time, part-time and contracted employees from the diverse sectors. The final sample size of 131 respondents was used. A qualitative data analysis was employed to gain deeper insight into the workers' emotional reactions, including their personal experiences of organisational support and psychological safety, during the transition from office to work from home setting.

Findings

The qualitative examination, through thematic coding, reveals the phenomenon of emotion triggered by social comparison emotion and critical socio-emotional resources (i.e. task, flexibility, communication, health and safety and social support) during a health crisis. Specifically, the employees' emotional reactions were elicited from the perceived organisational support, in how organisation cares for their well-being and work contributions and, in turn, influence the psychological safety. For example, the approach of the online communication (as a form of organisation support) practised by the managers has implications on the different levels of psychological safety experienced by the employee. In addition, emotional resources can be interpreted as organisation support. The findings revealed that emotions such as anxiety, stress, unfairness, inferiority and vulnerability are triggered by perceived inequity and comparison with the decisions or resources of the referent others of higher level such as the management (upward social comparison emotion). On the other hand, the emotions of pride, empathy, shared goals and support are generated by the care, collective interest and comparison of the referent others of lower level such as the subordinate (downward social comparison emotion). This study adds theoretical depth to the phenomenon of socio-emotional resources and the implications of psychological safety and organisational support of different work groups in the organisation.

Practical implications

The practical implications contribute to human resource management practices to understanding the socio-emotional resources of the core and periphery groups. It is imperative for organisation to exercise equity in the allocation of resources and treatment between different groups (core and periphery). The implications of this study show the phenomenon of emotional responses arise from comparison within groups linking with perceived fairness. The managerial decisions and supervisor management style are key factors in promoting healthy emotion and psychological safety. Management style such as micromanagement and control were not favourable among employees, and autonomy, trust and empathy resonate with employees. During a crisis and major workplace changes, demonstrating employee care through feedback, timely and specific information sharing and participatory form of communication contribute to the positive perception of procedural and interactional fairness. In the initial phase of workplace change amid crisis, some element of control is inevitable. Supervisor support may come in the form of open communication in conveying the rationale for the need to exercise control in one process and flexibility may be accorded in another task. The empowerment of workplace decisions, open communication in shared goals and assurance and trust are critical in enhancing a high psychological safety.

Originality/value

This study examines the roles of emotion, psychological safety and organisational support among different groups of workers (full-time, part-time and contracted employees) in the context of COVID-19 pandemic. There has been scant study in examining the core and periphery groups relating to these research topics. The findings in this study reveal the phenomenon of emotions triggered by social comparison during the workplace changes and the display of different socio-emotional resources within groups. This qualitative research supported the past studies that autonomy in decision-making, supervisor support, employee care and trust affect psychological safety.

Details

Journal of Organizational Effectiveness: People and Performance, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2051-6614

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 5 May 2020

Kathryn Ostermeier, Mark Davis and Robert Pavur

The purpose of this study is to examine the facilitating and inhibiting influence of team-level negative affectivity and conscientiousness on a dyad of emergent states…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the facilitating and inhibiting influence of team-level negative affectivity and conscientiousness on a dyad of emergent states, adopting and comparing both the composition and compilation perspectives.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected over three time points from 410 undergraduate students nested within cross-functional project teams (N = 62). The data, including individual self-reports and judges’ ratings of team performance, were aggregated to the team-level using both composition (mean) and compilation (skewness) approaches.

Findings

The findings indicate that mean-levels of negative affectivity were associated with decreased psychological safety. The use of skewed conscientiousness counterintuitively suggests too many highly conscientious members can also be detrimental to psychological safety. Psychological safety influences team potency and ultimately performance.

Originality/value

The results of this study highlight that the aggregation approach used is important. For example, the use of skewed (but not mean-level) conscientiousness brought an undetected and counterintuitive relationship to light. Future research should use compilation approaches in addition to composition approaches.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 26 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 24 September 2020

Chang-kyu Kwon, Seung-hyun Han and Aliki Nicolaides

The purpose of this study is to examine the impact of psychological safety on transformative learning in the workplace. This study focused on psychological safety as a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the impact of psychological safety on transformative learning in the workplace. This study focused on psychological safety as a specific practice that may or may not independently contribute to transformative learning outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

Data was gathered from 132 employees in one US manufacturing company through a survey asking about the perception of psychological safety and the experience of transformative learning. A mediation analysis was conducted to test the effects of transformative learning processes – social support, attitude toward uncertainty and criticality – on the relationship between psychological safety and transformative learning outcomes.

Findings

The results of this study showed that psychological safety led to transformative learning outcomes mediated by transformative learning processes including social support, attitude toward uncertainty and criticality.

Originality/value

Existing literature reveals little about the mechanism of how transformative learning occurs in the workplace. This study contributes to the field of human resource development by explaining the relationship between psychological safety and transformative learning, as well as first attempting to use transformative learning as a viable construct in workplace research.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 32 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 27 February 2020

Obasi Haki Akan, Eric P. Jack and Anju Mehta

This study aims to examine the relationship between concrescent conversation environment (CCE), psychological safety and team effectiveness. Although CCE has been known to…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the relationship between concrescent conversation environment (CCE), psychological safety and team effectiveness. Although CCE has been known to influence team outcomes, little is known about how it influences them. Integrating the social constructionist and social psychology perspectives, this study argues that CCE ignites a climate of psychological safety resulting in “joint-action” necessary for positive team outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey data were collected from 301 team members from US firms operating in different industries. Data were analyzed using SmartPLS.

Findings

The study establishes CCE as an antecedent to psychological safety and demonstrates that psychological safety mediates the relationship between CCE and team effectiveness.

Research limitations/implications

This is one of the initial studies to show how verbal behaviors socially construct team dynamics in the shape of psychological safety to influence team outcomes. In doing so, the authors advance the theory pertaining to the role of social exchanges in team processes and outcomes.

Practical implications

The results provide insights on how managers can improve team outcomes by influencing the conversational environment of the team to elicit feelings of psychological safety. The results also suggest that managers must focus on relational outcomes as well, along with performance outcomes.

Originality/value

From a social constructionist perspective, team development is built upon the verbal behaviors of the members as they pursue tasks. However, the extant group dynamics literature undervalues conversations’ role in team processes and outcomes. This is the first study that examines the link between a team's conversational environment, psychological safety and team outcomes.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 26 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 8 February 2016

Wenxing Liu, Pengcheng Zhang, Jianqiao Liao, Po Hao and Jianghua Mao

Prior researches have indicated that leadership had an important impact on employee creativity. However, the authors know little about the link between the dark side of…

Downloads
4256

Abstract

Purpose

Prior researches have indicated that leadership had an important impact on employee creativity. However, the authors know little about the link between the dark side of leadership-abusive supervision, and employee creativity, as well as its underlying mechanisms. Combining psychological safety theory and social identification theory, the purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between abusive supervision and employee creativity and the mediating role of psychological safety and organizational identification between abusive supervision and employee creativity.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted a multi-source and time-lagged data collection. At Time 1, team members evaluated abusive supervision and psychological safety, and at Time 2, team members evaluated organization identification, and team leaders evaluated members’ creativity. Abusive supervision, psychological safety were evaluated at first stage and organizational identification, creativity were evaluated at second stage, being conducted 2-4 weeks later after the first stage. Finally 423 participants completed two waves of data collection.

Findings

The results suggested that, abusive supervision had negative effects on psychological safety and organizational identification, and psychological safety partially mediated the relationship between abusive supervision and organizational identification, and organizational identification fully mediated the relationship between psychological safety and creativity, and the negative effect of abusive supervision on employee creativity was mediated by psychological safety and then by organizational identification.

Originality/value

This study identifies and examines the mechanism underlying the effect of abusive supervision, and suggests that psychological safety and organizational identification are two important mediators of the complex relationship between abusive supervision and employee creativity. Therefore, this study not only re-examines the inconsistent effect of abusive supervision on employee creativity, but also represents the first attempt at integrating the psychological safety perspective and social identification theory to study employee creativity and offers important implications for theory development.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 54 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 19 December 2018

Sumi Jha

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationships between team psychological safety and team performance and to test the mediating effect of learning orientation…

Downloads
1400

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationships between team psychological safety and team performance and to test the mediating effect of learning orientation and moderating effect of psychological empowerment on that relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 50 teams and 345 team members from 20 different organizations. The moderated mediation analysis of psychological empowerment was tested using hierarchical regression analysis (PROCESS Macro) in SPSS.

Findings

The results show that higher the psychological empowerment, higher is the effect of psychological safety and learning orientation on team performance. Results supported the moderated mediation analysis of psychological empowerment.

Practical implications

Given that psychological empowerment and learning orientation of team members will effect team performance, organizational efforts to foster psychological empowerment should be rewarding. Focusing on channelizing team psychological safety to improve team members’ relationship, openness and comfort with each other will increase team performance.

Originality/value

The study incorporated learning orientation and psychological empowerment to redefine the relationship between psychological safety and team performance.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 21000