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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1999

Kathryn Ley

Describes a feedback system for distant students including the tools and documents to provide feedback on frequent fixed response assignments and on projects or essay…

Abstract

Describes a feedback system for distant students including the tools and documents to provide feedback on frequent fixed response assignments and on projects or essay response assignments. A distance feedback system depends upon carefully planned, written assignments; specified evaluation criteria; and technology. It includes documentation, progress tracking, standardized responses based upon the specified evaluation criteria, and multiple assessments during the course. The proposed feedback system accommodates technological limitations yet provides useful feedback to facilitate distant student learning. The system could be adapted to benefit students enrolled in traditional instruction. A description of the feedback system components follows a brief introduction to instructional feedback and feedback levels and functions.

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Campus-Wide Information Systems, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-0741

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Article
Publication date: 6 May 2014

Esyin Chew

In response to the less satisfied National Student Survey, UK universities have committed to transform assessment and feedback experience. This paper aims to explore how

Abstract

Purpose

In response to the less satisfied National Student Survey, UK universities have committed to transform assessment and feedback experience. This paper aims to explore how the diversity of online assessment and feedback offer a better learning experience for international students.

Design/methodology/approach

By using the action research method, the research investigated academic and international students' first experience on audio feedback and online text. Video interviews and online questionnaires were carried out.

Findings

All research participants would like to receive assessment feedback in audio form. This reflects the learning experience of students and suggests that the support of a higher educational institution or a tutor could provide for assessment and feedback enhancement in the digital world is mandatory. Other than the technological and instrumental advantage, the “human element” of audio feedback makes it unique and interesting to listen to in contrast to online written feedback.

Research limitations/implications

It is recognised that the number of student participants was small but the qualitative findings demonstrate some key issues in relation to international student experience and the effectiveness and engagement of assessment feedback that may inspire future empirical research.

Practical implications

Some conditions under which feedback is likely to be effective are not met as frequently as originally believed, audio feedback can be thoughtfully considered as an alternative assessment feedback mechanism for international students.

Originality/value

The “‘human element’ of audio assessment feedback” defeats online written text for international students. They appreciate the effort spent by the tutor to provide them assessment and feedback personally by “talking to them”.

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Article
Publication date: 10 September 2021

Raniya Abdullah Alsehibany

This study aims to examine Saudi female students' attitude toward peer feedback activity in writing classes with a list of questions for the students to follow during the…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine Saudi female students' attitude toward peer feedback activity in writing classes with a list of questions for the students to follow during the activity, and to investigate the challenges that may prevent the use of such activity in Saudi EFL classes.

Design/methodology/approach

This study used a mixed-methods to ensure the credibility of the data and obtain clear descriptions about the topic. The study instruments are (1) Writing Essays, (2) Writing Checklist, (3) Questionnaire and (4) Semi-structured interview. The data were analysis with SPSS and o 10 software.

Findings

The study results indicated that students had a positive attitude toward peer feedback with a checklist in EFL writing class. For instance, their second written essay (post) has improved and has fewer mistakes than the first one. Also, most of the participants stated that peer feedback has improved their writing quality and has enhanced their writing awareness of their weaknesses and mistakes. Moreover, the interview had highlighted the main challenges that could affect using peer feedback in writing class. Finally, the results indicate the efficiency of peer feedback with a checklist in similar teaching contexts.

Research limitations/implications

The study focused on a small number of participants (30 students). Besides, the study dealt with students at university level only and the study focused on female students.

Practical implications

Based on the study finding, it is recommended that peer feedback should be integrated in all EFL writing classes at all levels. Based on the study finding, it is recommended that peer feedback should be incorporated in all EFL writing classes at all levels. Using checklist can help the students to become more independent learners and in time they will be able to correct their own mistakes.

Originality/value

This paper fulfills an identified need to identify how integrating peer feedback activity in writing class can improve the students' writing performance and help them to be independent learners.

Details

PSU Research Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2399-1747

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Article
Publication date: 13 July 2021

Murray Lane and Deanna Meth

Feedback is usually given for the primary benefit of the feedback recipient and often involves the unidirectional delivery of information. The purpose of this paper is to…

Abstract

Purpose

Feedback is usually given for the primary benefit of the feedback recipient and often involves the unidirectional delivery of information. The purpose of this paper is to reverse this emphasis and examines the impacts on students of giving feedback to staff as an ongoing dialogue in the delivery of a teaching unit.

Design/methodology/approach

This novel study uses surveys and focus groups for an in-depth case study of the impact of students giving feedback to staff. It examines different aspects of students’ experiences related to their sense of being supported and valued, together with issues of relevance, timeliness and the actionability of feedback.

Findings

Results show that the regular giving of feedback by students and their subsequent academic actions can help increase students’ sense of being supported and valued. The strongest correlations occurred between the responses of those who felt valued and supported and their perception that their own feedback was acted upon during the semester. There is also some evidence suggesting that students felt valued when observing that other studentsfeedback was acted upon either immediately or in the future.

Research limitations/implications

The single case study approach to this research means that only one cohort of students was tested. Research on further cohorts would help to validate the findings.

Practical implications

This study could have implications for teaching quality and practice in better directing, communicating, engaging and following up on student feedback.

Originality/value

Whilst the benefit to the staff of student feedback is well documented, there is little evidence documenting benefits to students. This study addresses this gap in existing research.

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

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Book part
Publication date: 22 November 2012

Tiffany M. Winchester and Maxwell K. Winchester

Student evaluations of teaching (SETs) are the most frequent form of faculty performance in the classroom, though they tend to be used as summative rather than formative…

Abstract

Student evaluations of teaching (SETs) are the most frequent form of faculty performance in the classroom, though they tend to be used as summative rather than formative evaluations. In this chapter, a project involving the use of a virtual learning environment for formative, weekly SETs is explored from both the student and faculty point of view at a rural university college in the United Kingdom. This project encouraged student participation in creating the learning environment and faculty reflection on how to improve the student experience. From the student perspective, the weekly anonymous evaluations were useful for providing feedback; however, students tended to only respond if they were not satisfied with the faculty member. The exception to this was that some students were more motivated to complete the evaluation forms if they believed the faculty member was utilising their feedback. From the faculty perspective, the feedback was not as detailed as they had expected, and some questioned whether it was worth the effort of conducting formative evaluations if the response rate was so low. Others used the feedback for reflective purposes, and it was found that those that reflected on their work at higher levels tended to receive a greater year-on-year increase in their end of year teaching evaluations.

Details

Increasing Student Engagement and Retention Using Immersive Interfaces: Virtual Worlds, Gaming, and Simulation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-241-7

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Article
Publication date: 3 August 2008

Stephanie White

Student teachers completing a three year pre‐service primary teaching degree in New Zealand experience a practical teaching component called professional practice. This is…

Abstract

Student teachers completing a three year pre‐service primary teaching degree in New Zealand experience a practical teaching component called professional practice. This is carried out in school placements for block periods and involves a visiting lecturer from their institution observing them teaching to ensure they are meeting their specific learning outcomes. One of the significant aspects of the lecturer visit is the giving of both spoken and written feedback to students on a variety of areas of their teaching practice. This action research was carried out over a two‐year period using the experiences of students in their second and third years to investigate the quality of feedback they received and the ways in which it could be improved. Throughout the study, the researcher used a qualitative research approach that involved in‐depth interviews and surveys with the students and two focus‐group discussions with lecturers. This approach allowed her to focus on her own practice of giving feedback to student teachers and to discover some unexpected aspects about herself as a practitioner. These reflections and other aspects of the study identified the key aspects for best quality feedback practice as; written reflections by the student teachers pre‐prepared questions by the observing lecturer in order to provide structure and guidance for the feedback process; establishment of as much time as possible for the feedback discussions; lecturers employing coaching skills for adult learners; honesty as a valued and welcomed trait; recognition that tacit knowledge is valuable and should be shared; and lecturers being readily available to students and able to provide them with prompt responses.

Details

Qualitative Research Journal, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1443-9883

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Article
Publication date: 3 December 2018

Maria Cutumisu

This study aims to examine the impact of the informational value of feedback choices (confirmatory versus critical feedback) on students’ performance, their choice to…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the impact of the informational value of feedback choices (confirmatory versus critical feedback) on students’ performance, their choice to revise and the time they spend designing posters and reading feedback in a computer-based assessment game, Posterlet.

Design/methodology/approach

An empirical correlational study was conducted to collect the choices to seek confirmatory or critical feedback and to revise posters in a poster design task from 106 grade 8 students from a middle school in California via Posterlet.

Findings

The results of the study show that critical uninformative feedback is associated with students’ performance, and critical informative feedback is associated with their learning strategies (i.e. feedback dwell time and willingness to revise), while confirmatory informative feedback is negatively associated with both performance and learning strategies.

Research limitations/implications

The study controlled the choice students were given regarding the valence of their feedback but not regarding the informational value of their feedback. Additionally, the study was conducted with middle-school students, and more research is needed to ascertain whether the results generalize to other populations.

Practical implications

The findings can be used to balance the design of the informational content of feedback messages to support student performance in an open-ended, creative design task. This study may also inform the design and implementation of agents (e.g. virtual characters) able to provide user-adaptive feedback for online interactive learning environments.

Originality/value

This study constitutes the first research to examine the informational value of feedback that is chosen rather than received, the latter being the prevalent model of delivering feedback in education.

Details

Interactive Technology and Smart Education, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-5659

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Article
Publication date: 6 February 2017

Mireilla Bikanga Ada, Mark Stansfield and Gavin Baxter

The purpose of this paper is to investigate an area of growing importance that is widely recognised in the literature relating to the issue of how to improve ways that…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate an area of growing importance that is widely recognised in the literature relating to the issue of how to improve ways that assessments and feedback are provided to students within higher education. This paper reports on a study that aimed to explore the views of both educators (n=70) and students (n=540) on feedback and feed-forward at a UK university. The study also investigated their experience and attitudes to social media applications as a means of enhancing access to feedback within the context of mobile learning.

Design/methodology/approach

The research approach adopted in this study predominately conforms to a quantitative research design though embeds elements of qualitative research via a “mixed methods” approach. The overall methodology of the paper adheres to an exploratory case study in a higher education environment to identify various issues and approaches that could be addressed or enhanced to aid ways that assessments and feedback are disseminated to students within higher education.

Findings

Participants’ views were sought in relation to students receiving learning materials, as well as feedback from tutors directly to their smartphones and mobile devices. In addition, the study explored possible reasons for students not wanting to use social media and mobile devices for their learning and feedback. Overall, the results indicated a positive attitude on the part of educators and students to using mobile devices and social media applications for teaching and learning purposes.

Research limitations/implications

The case study presented in this paper draws on findings from one higher educational institution. Further research is required to determine the generalisability of the findings to allow comparison of the findings to be undertaken within other higher education institutions.

Originality/value

The originality of the paper is that it provides detailed empirical evidence and findings that provide several important implications in relation to enhancing the student learning experience and providing considerable improvements to the way that feedback is provided that make it more likely that students will take more notice to feedback and act upon it. This in turn enables educators to better plan and manage their teaching and student experience online and through students’ mobile devices. The value of this study is that it explores views of both educators and students, whereas many other previous studies tend to focus on the views of either educators or students.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

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Article
Publication date: 6 November 2009

Ian Robert Hamilton

The purpose of this paper is to report on the rationale behind the use of a unique paper‐based individualised accounting assignment, which automated the provision to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report on the rationale behind the use of a unique paper‐based individualised accounting assignment, which automated the provision to students of immediate formative and timely summative feedback.

Design/methodology/approach

As students worked towards completing their assignment, the package provided immediate formative feedback with sufficient indicators for the student to identify that they had made an error and provided encouragement for the student to take appropriate corrective action until they were satisfied that their answer was correct. Once the student was satisfied with their work, their submission was automatically marked by the assessment package according to the pre‐set marking scheme.

Findings

The assignment experience reported here has shown the potential for interactive spreadsheets to be created for a wide range of rule‐based accounting problems to provide formative and summative feedback. The package can be (and has been) easily extended beyond financial accounting to many other accounting‐ and non‐accounting‐related fields, e.g. tax, audit, economics and statistics. In fact, individualised assignments utilising interactive spreadsheets appear to have broad applicability in any educational context (including mathematics, engineering and science) where a correct numerical answer is required.

Originality/value

The unique automated feedback and marking package was developed by the author utilising Microsoft's Excel spreadsheeting tool. The marking package generated a detailed summary providing important feedback to students clearly identifying correct answers and specific problem areas, enabling the student to review these aspects. The package also provided feedback to the teacher identifying the cohort's performance on each item in the assessment.

Details

Campus-Wide Information Systems, vol. 26 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-0741

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Article
Publication date: 17 May 2011

Anna Rowe

Feedback is a central element of the learning experience yet, until recently, few studies have focused directly on what students think about feedback. This paper seeks to…

Abstract

Purpose

Feedback is a central element of the learning experience yet, until recently, few studies have focused directly on what students think about feedback. This paper seeks to address this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

Data collected as part of a larger study investigating reasons for consistently low ratings of feedback across the higher education sector are reported. The larger study includes Rowe and Wood's Student Feedback Questionnaire (SFQ), which gathers quantitative data on student perceptions and preferences for feedback, but also includes two open‐ended questions inviting students to give written comments on why they believe feedback is important, and how the feedback they are getting could be improved.

Findings

Focusing on responses to the first open‐ended question and viewing comments in the context of the larger study and its findings, an analysis is offered of the students' responses, extracting seven different student conceptions of the function of feedback.

Research limitations/implications

Feedback serves a wide variety of functions in the lives of students, not limited to the implication of feedback for learning. Students are most likely to succeed in an environment where their broader social needs are met.

Originality/value

The findings reported in this paper contribute to an area of educational research previously neglected, drawing attention to: the importance which students attach to feedback as a teacher's personal response to them as individuals; and the need to take into account students' perceptions – both positive and negative – of the emotional aspects of feedback.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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