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Book part
Publication date: 4 February 2008

Kenneth Wolf, Alan Davis and Hilda Borko

In this National Board-commissioned study, we examined types of feedback that teacher candidates for certification might receive along with their score reports after…

Abstract

In this National Board-commissioned study, we examined types of feedback that teacher candidates for certification might receive along with their score reports after completing the Board's assessment process. We designed three standardized forms of feedback and interviewed 29 teachers from the 1993–1994 Early Adolescent/Generalist cohort about their preferences for each of the feedback options and about the inferences that they drew about their performance based on each type. The three feedback formats were (a) cases – extended descriptions of actual performances, annotated with scorer notes; (b) performance syntheses – brief descriptions of the scoring criteria accompanied by a variety of excerpts from candidate materials portraying performances at each level; and (c) illustrative summaries – evaluative descriptions of various candidate responses. Teachers reported that, of the three standardized formats offered to them, they preferred the cases format with its extended descriptions of an actual performance accompanied by annotated scoring notes. In terms of learning effects, candidates drew reasonably accurate inferences about their performance based on both cases and performance syntheses. The central conclusion we reached based on these findings was that feedback needs to be clearly organized around the scoring criteria for the exercise, and that examples of actual performances illustrating the application of the scoring criteria are important. However, teachers also reported that they would have preferred individualized, customized feedback on their own performance, although this option was not offered by the Board. As well, teachers indicated they would have preferred receiving the standardized feedback as “feedfront” to use in guiding them in their teaching and in preparing their assessment materials.

Details

Assessing Teachers for Professional Certification: The First Decade of the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-1055-5

Article
Publication date: 16 June 2022

Adnan Muhammad Shah, Wazir Muhammad and KangYoon Lee

This study examines how service feedback and physician popularity affect physician demand in the context of virtual healthcare environment. Based on the signaling theory…

Abstract

Purpose

This study examines how service feedback and physician popularity affect physician demand in the context of virtual healthcare environment. Based on the signaling theory, the critical factor of environment uncertainty (i.e. disease risk) and its impact on physician demand is also investigated. Further, the research on the endogeneity of online reviews in healthcare is also examined in the current study.

Design/methodology/approach

A secondary data econometric analysis using 3-wave data sets of 823 physicians obtained from two PRWs (Healthgrades and Vitals) was conducted. The analysis was run using the difference-in-difference method to consider physician and website-specific effects.

Findings

The study's findings indicate that physician popularity has a stronger positive effect on physician demand compared with service feedback. Improving popularity leads to a relative increase in the number of appointments, which in turn enhance physician demand. Further, the impact of physician popularity on physician demand is positively mitigated by the disease risk.

Originality/value

The authors' research contributes to a better understanding of the signaling transmission mechanism in the online healthcare environment. Further, the findings provide practical implications for key stakeholders into how an efficient feedback and popularity mechanism can be built to enhance physician service outcomes in order to maximize the financial efficiency of physicians.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 May 2022

Manting Deng

Organizations have widely adopted enterprise social media (ESM) to realize workplace communication visibility linked to employee knowledge management and in-role job…

Abstract

Purpose

Organizations have widely adopted enterprise social media (ESM) to realize workplace communication visibility linked to employee knowledge management and in-role job performance. Managers still face challenges in understanding whether communication visibility in the workplace stimulates employee extra-role voice behavior. In this study, self-regulation theory is applied to explore the mediating role of feedback-seeking on the association between communication visibility and employee voice.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire survey was carried out on 219 working professionals in China who use ESM in their respective organizations.

Findings

Results show that employee feedback inquiry considerably mediates the relationship between communication visibility and voice. However, employee feedback monitoring shows no mediating role.

Research limitations/implications

Practitioners and managers must pay greater attention to the effects of communication visibility on employee extra-role voice behavior. In addition, when adopting ESM, employee self-regulation strategies can be implemented to gain the value of communication visibility.

Originality/value

This study presents the relationships among communication visibility, feedback-seeking and employee voice. Knowledge of communication visibility is extended by exploring its effects on employee voice. The current study also reveals the mediating mechanism underlying the associations between communication visibility and employee voice based on self-regulation theory.

Details

Internet Research, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2022

Esra Alp Coşkun

Although some research has been carried out on feedback trading in different asset classes, there have been few empirical investigations that consider both major and…

Abstract

Purpose

Although some research has been carried out on feedback trading in different asset classes, there have been few empirical investigations that consider both major and emerging stock markets (Koutmos, 1997; Antoniou et al., 2005; Kim, 2009) stock index futures (Salm and Schuppli, 2010). In this study, the author examines positive/negative feedback trading in both developed-emerging-frontier-standalone (51) stock markets for 2010–2020 and sub-periods including COVID-19 period.

Design/methodology/approach

The hypothesis “feedback trading behaviour led the price boom/bust in the stock markets during the first quarter of COVID-19 pandemic” is tested by employing the Sentana and Wadhwani (1992) framework and using asymmetrical GARCH models (GJRGARCH, EGARCH) in accordance with the empirical literature.

Findings

The following conclusions can be drawn from the present study; (1) There is no evidence to support a significant distinction between developed, emerging, frontier or standalone markets or high/upper middle, lower middle income economies in the case of feedback trading. It is more likely to be a general phenomenon reflecting the outcomes of general human psychology (2) in the long term (2010–2020) based on the feedback trading results Asian stock markets appear to be far from efficiency.

Research limitations/implications

Stock markets are selected based on data availability.

Practical implications

Several inferences can be drawn about overall results. First, investors and portfolio managers should beware of their investment decisions during bearish market conditions where volatility is on the rise and also when there is a strong reaction to bad news/negative shocks in the market. Moreover, investing in Asia stock markets may require more attention since those markets are reputed to be more “idiosyncratic”, less reliant on economic and corporate fundamentals in their pricing. Moreover, the impact of foreign investors on stock market volatility and returns and weaker implementation of regulations also affect the efficiency of the markets (Lipinsky and Ong, 2014).

Originality/value

To the best of the author’s knowledge, most studies in the field of feedback trading in stock markets have only focused on a small sample of countries and second, the effect of COVID-19 uncertainty on the stock markets have not been addressed in the literature with respect to feedback trading. This paper fills these literature gaps. This study is expected to provide useful insights for understanding the instabilities in stock markets particularly under conditions of high uncertainty and to fill the gap in the literature by comparing the results for a large sample of countries both in the long term and in the pandemic.

Highlights for review

  1. This study has shown that feedback trading is more prevalent in Asian stock markets in the long run in Europe, America or Middle East for the period 2010–2020.

  2. Positive feedback traders generally dominated most of the stock markets during the early period of COVID-19 pandemic.

  3. Another major finding was that the stock markets in Malaysia, Japan, the Philippines, Estonia, Portugal and Ukraine are dominated by negative feedback traders which may be interpreted as “disposition effect” meaning that they sell the “past winners”.

  4. In Indonesia, New Zealand, China, Austria, Greece, UK, Finland, Spain, Iceland, Norway, Switzerland, Poland, Turkey, Chile and Argentina neither positive nor negative feedback trading exists even under uncertain conditions.

This study has shown that feedback trading is more prevalent in Asian stock markets in the long run in Europe, America or Middle East for the period 2010–2020.

Positive feedback traders generally dominated most of the stock markets during the early period of COVID-19 pandemic.

Another major finding was that the stock markets in Malaysia, Japan, the Philippines, Estonia, Portugal and Ukraine are dominated by negative feedback traders which may be interpreted as “disposition effect” meaning that they sell the “past winners”.

In Indonesia, New Zealand, China, Austria, Greece, UK, Finland, Spain, Iceland, Norway, Switzerland, Poland, Turkey, Chile and Argentina neither positive nor negative feedback trading exists even under uncertain conditions.

Details

Review of Behavioral Finance, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1940-5979

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 April 2022

Michael Timms

This paper aims to explain the importance for managers to request feedback as a way to improve their leadership skills.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explain the importance for managers to request feedback as a way to improve their leadership skills.

Design/methodology/approach

The author provides a series of tips on requesting feedback, based on his consulting experience and academic research.

Findings

The author gives readers an array of tips and exercises for managers to request feedback at their organizations.

Originality/value

This paper will prove valuable for readers who are in a leadership position or looking to improve upon their ability to be accountable.

Details

Strategic HR Review, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1475-4398

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 1980

TONY FRASER and KERI PHILLIPS

In the article ‘Approaches to Social Skills Training’ we outlined three levels at which social skills training can be conducted in terms of learning by Thinking, Doing and…

Abstract

In the article ‘Approaches to Social Skills Training’ we outlined three levels at which social skills training can be conducted in terms of learning by Thinking, Doing and Feeling. We pointed out that often trainers concentrate on learning in one or two of these areas rather than mixing the approaches and integrating them in one learning process. We summarised some of the ingredients and consequences of these three approaches and presented a broad spectrum of training styles from which the social skills trainer can select. Finally we pointed out the need to distinguish between training and therapy at one end of the spectrum, and suggested how the trainer could establish a clear boundary. In this article we examine feedback in detail as one aspect of social skills training and we explore the range of choices the trainer has in this area.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 12 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

Article
Publication date: 3 June 2014

M.S. Rao

– The purpose of this paper is to present tips for leaders on receiving and giving feedback.

1016

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present tips for leaders on receiving and giving feedback.

Design/methodology/approach

Various types of feedback and the difference between feedback and criticism have been described.

Findings

It has been emphasized that leaders need to view feedback as a developmental tool. Its importance in achieving leadership excellence also has been stressed.

Practical implications

This paper argues that feedback helps employees to recognize their blind spots, correct themselves and perform better. It also serves as an employee retention tool. People crave feedback, especially positive feedback. But the feedback givers must know the art of giving feedback so that they are respected for it.

Social implications

This paper advances the view that people excel through improvement and can improve through feedback.

Originality/value

This paper describes how to use feedback as a tool to develop future leaders.

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1995

Bruce McAfee, Vernon Quarstein and Alireza Ardalan

A recent article reported that employees′ performance increasedwhen they were allowed to chose the production method and were providedwith the outcome feedback on their…

3256

Abstract

A recent article reported that employees′ performance increased when they were allowed to chose the production method and were provided with the outcome feedback on their performance. Extends that study by analysing the effect of discretion, outcome feedback, and process feedback on employee satisfaction. The results of the experiments indicate that, although providing discretion and outcome feedback improved employee satisfaction, the improvement was statistically insignificant. The more interesting result indicates that satisfaction was significantly improved when employees were provided with process feedback in addition to discretion and outcome feedback.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 95 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 2004

Lisa A. Steelman and Kelly A. Rutkowski

Previous research indicates that unfavorable feedback, even unfavorable feedback provided for developmental purposes only, is not perceived as useful, results in negative…

7000

Abstract

Previous research indicates that unfavorable feedback, even unfavorable feedback provided for developmental purposes only, is not perceived as useful, results in negative reactions and is not associated with a recipient's willingness to change his or her behavior. This study examined the extent to which contextual variables mitigate these unwanted effects of developmental unfavorable feedback. Results indicate that employees are more motivated to improve their job performance based on unfavorable feedback when the feedback source is perceived to be credible, the feedback is of high quality and the feedback is delivered in a considerate manner.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2004

James W. Smither, Manuel London, Richard R. Reilly, Raymond Flautt, Yvette Vargas and Ivy Kucine

This paper hypothesized that ratees who share their multisource feedback with raters and ask for suggestions would improve more than other ratees. The participants were…

1919

Abstract

This paper hypothesized that ratees who share their multisource feedback with raters and ask for suggestions would improve more than other ratees. The participants were 5,335 ratees in a large, global corporation who received multisource feedback. Nine months after the initial survey, there was a follow‐up survey in which raters indicated whether the feedback recipient had shared the feedback and asked for suggestions. One year after the initial survey, there was a second multisource feedback survey. It was found that sharing feedback and asking for suggestions accounted for only a very small (albeit statistically significant) proportion of variance in improvement over time. This paper discusses factors that may affect the impact of sharing feedback and asking for suggestions following multisource feedback.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 23 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

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