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Article
Publication date: 15 June 2021

This paper aims to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting-edge research and case studies.

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting-edge research and case studies.

Design/methodology/approach

This briefing is prepared by an independent writer who adds their own impartial comments and places the articles in context.

Findings

Increased globalization has led to increased diversity. This can have positive effects for the workplace in terms of increased variety of knowledge, skills and experience. However, there can also be negative impacts of diversity in terms of reduced social cohesion, poor communication and increased conflict. Diversity management can help to reduce the negative effects and capitalize on the positive effects of diversity, in order to enhance organizational performance. Diversity needs to be context-specific, taking into account a wider range of individual attributes, and needs to be supported by diversity at the top management level in order to maximize organizational effectiveness.

Originality

The briefing saves busy executives and researchers hours of reading time by selecting only the very best, most pertinent information and presenting it in a condensed and easy-to-digest format.

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest , vol. 29 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

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Book part
Publication date: 19 December 2016

Denice Adkins

This chapter provides a review of diversity management as framed in business and organizational management literature, and relates that literature to the current state of…

Abstract

Purpose

This chapter provides a review of diversity management as framed in business and organizational management literature, and relates that literature to the current state of diversity theory development in library and information science (LIS).

Methodology/approach

This review begins with a theoretical orientation, focusing on organizational theories, diversity management models, and diversity conflict frameworks. It then summarizes some empirical literature for organizations seeking to create a diverse environment. It concludes with a discussion of diversity models developed in and for LIS.

Findings

Library and information science has lagged behind organizational science in research and theory development related to diversity. Most of the LIS research that has been done has focused on individuals rather than library systems or the larger organizational systems in which they are embedded. Practical questions are raised about the extent of diversity concerns in the day-to-day operations and practices of libraries, and where diversity concerns come into conflict with librarians’ professional values.

Details

Celebrating the James Partridge Award: Essays Toward the Development of a More Diverse, Inclusive, and Equitable Field of Library and Information Science
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-933-9

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Book part
Publication date: 16 June 2021

Jennifer Kuklenski

Abstract

Details

Diversity and Organizational Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-593-4

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Article
Publication date: 30 September 2021

Angelina Nhat Hanh Le, Tessa Tien Nguyen and Julian Ming-Sung Cheng

While strategic alliances is a concept increasingly discussed in the field of sustainable supply chain management (SSCM), an emerging and more crucial concept regarding…

Abstract

Purpose

While strategic alliances is a concept increasingly discussed in the field of sustainable supply chain management (SSCM), an emerging and more crucial concept regarding alliances—namely, the alliance portfolio—is mostly ignored in the SSCM context. Mainly drawing on the categorisation–elaboration model (CEM), this research develops a three-layer model to explore the effects of three alliance portfolio diversity facets on the three triple-bottom-line SSCM performances through the mediation of sustainability collaboration.

Design/methodology/approach

The field data are collected from 321 Vietnamese manufacturers. Scale accuracy is assessed through the confirmatory factor analysis method. Hierarchical linear regressions are applied to test the proposed model and hypotheses.

Findings

Partner, governance, and functional alliance portfolio diversities have a U-shaped, inverted U-shaped, and positive linear effect, respectively, on sustainability collaboration. Sustainability collaboration is in turn found to enhance the SSCM performances in terms of economic, environmental, and social.

Originality/value

This research introduced a new theoretical lens, CEM, to the SSCM field. It also provided findings that can help firms to manage their alliance portfolios more dynamically in terms of the nature and diversity level of the portfolio and in a way that adds to the triple bottom line through the mediating effect of sustainability collaboration.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 18 October 2021

Tao Wang

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effect of board human capital diversity on corporate innovation. Moreover, it examines the moderating effect of internal…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effect of board human capital diversity on corporate innovation. Moreover, it examines the moderating effect of internal social capital on the relationship between board human capital diversity and corporate innovation.

Design/methodology/approach

The hypotheses are tested using a data set on Standard & Poor’s 1500 firms from 2000 to 2015. To overcome omit variable bias and reverse causality, this paper uses change-on-change regression by exploring the exogenous shock of the death of the directors.

Findings

Findings show that board industry diversity has a curvilinear relationship with corporate innovation. In addition, the board co-tenure experience, a key factor of internal social capital, can mitigate the risk of board industry diversity and improve corporate innovation.

Originality/value

Prior studies mostly considered the demographic dimension of diversity and, therefore, have overlooked how other dimensions influence firms. This paper considers the human capital dimension of board diversity and investigates the effect of board industry diversity on the firm’s innovation outcome. In addition, this paper also addresses the question of whether the interaction of different director attributes, namely, board human capital and board internal social capital, can complement each other to enhance corporate innovation.

Details

Corporate Governance: The International Journal of Business in Society, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-0701

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Article
Publication date: 6 October 2021

Ayman Issa and Mohammad A.A. Zaid

Drawing on the multi-theoretical perspective, the primary purpose of this paper is to empirically investigate the inextricably entwined nexus between board gender diversity

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing on the multi-theoretical perspective, the primary purpose of this paper is to empirically investigate the inextricably entwined nexus between board gender diversity and corporate environmental performance within cross-country context.

Design/methodology/approach

Multiple regression analysis on a cross-country panel data analysis was used. Further, the authors applied static panel data estimator ordinary least squares (OLS) as a baseline model with different proxies of gender diversity. In addition, to control for the potential endogeneity problem and providing robust findings, the authors run two-stage least squares (2SLS) and lagged independent variables.

Findings

The findings clearly unveiled that corporate environmental performance is positively and significantly affected by the level of gender diversity on board. This inextricable and intimate nexus is vastly attributed to the argument that female directors show greater concerns for eco-friendly activities.

Practical implications

The findings of this study provide useful and fruitful insights for regulatory parties and policymakers to mandate gender quota in electing boardroom members to ameliorate corporate environmental performance.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, most of the prior studies have not yet provided a multi-theoretical analysis of the effect of board gender diversity on environmental performance. Thereby, this study handled this contemporary gap and went beyond the narrow perspectives by diving deep with cross-country analysis.

Details

International Journal of Accounting & Information Management, vol. 29 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1834-7649

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Article
Publication date: 16 September 2021

Waqas Bin Khidmat, Muhammad Danish Habib, Sadia Awan and Kashif Raza

This study aims to examine the determinants of the female representations on Chinese listed firm’s boards. This study also investigates the effect of gender diversity on…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the determinants of the female representations on Chinese listed firm’s boards. This study also investigates the effect of gender diversity on corporate social responsibility activities.

Design/methodology/approach

The Tobit regression model is used because the data is censored and using ordinary least square regression can give spurious results. For robust check, the authors also used Heckman’s (1979) two-stage self-selection model to remove the sample self-selection bias.

Findings

The authors find that the female representations on the corporate board are positively associated with firm age, firm performance, corporate governance, family ownership, institutional ownership and managerial ownership while negatively related to firm size and state ownership. This study also incorporates predictors of the critical mass of women on the Chinese listed firm’s board. The study also tests the female-led hypothesis and concludes that the female representation increases in firms with female chief executive officer (CEO) or female chairpersons. The Chinese listed firms with gender-diverse board are socially responsible.

Research limitations/implications

The importance of diversity in corporate boards has been demonstrated in light of the agency theory and the resource dependence framework. The results contribute to the previous literature by documenting the determinants of female representations on board, robust by alternative measures of gender diversity, firm size, corporate governance and estimation techniques.

Practical implications

The economic significance of gender diversity stirred the firms to increase female representation. The policymakers can understand the reasons for female underrepresentation in Chinese boards and can reform the regulation to enhance governance quality, non-state ownership and risk aversion among the listed firms.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the literature by providing empirical evidence on the key predictor of the world’s largest emerging economy, specifically the study focuses on the firm specific determinants, different governance attributes, ownership structure and firm risk measures. This study also seeks to answer if the presence of a female in the Chairperson or CEO position encourages the firms to hire more female directors or not?

Details

Management Research Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

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Article
Publication date: 24 September 2021

Rabiatu Kamil and Kingsley Opoku Appiah

This study aims to investigate the nexus between gender-diverse boards and cost of debt in the developing economies context. Specifically, the authors examine whether firm…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the nexus between gender-diverse boards and cost of debt in the developing economies context. Specifically, the authors examine whether firm size moderates the relationship between female board representation and cost of debt, regardless of the industry type.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors use panel data from 17 non-financial listed Ghanaian firms over the period 2007–2017, ordinary least square, two-stage least square and generalised method of moments estimations to test the hypothesis.

Findings

The authors find that board gender diversity is positively related to cost of debt. Further evidence suggests the interaction of firm size and board gender diversity displays a negative association with cost of debt.

Practical implications

The study evidence suggests larger non-manufacturing firms with gender-diverse boards attract lower cost of capital in an environment with lax enforcement of rules and regulations in corporate governance.

Social implications

Lenders consider the size and industry of firms in pricing debt. This has implications on UN Goal 5, highlighting that shareholders of larger non-manufacturing firms benefit immensely from board gender diversity in the context of debt.

Originality/value

The authors contribute to the board gender diversity and cost of debt literature by demonstrating that firm size and industry type matter in the developing economies context.

Details

Gender in Management: An International Journal , vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

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Article
Publication date: 31 August 2021

Stefanos Nachmias, Fotios Mitsakis, Eleni Aravopoulou, Christopher J. Rees and Amairisa Kouki

Drawing on the social exchange theory, this study aims to explore line managers' perceptions of diversity management, as well as their perceptions of their role and…

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing on the social exchange theory, this study aims to explore line managers' perceptions of diversity management, as well as their perceptions of their role and responsibilities in shaping and implementing diversity practices. The senior management's leadership support, as it is perceived by line managers, in assisting them to manage diversity successfully is also examined.

Design/methodology/approach

Semi-structured interviews with 51 line managers across different sectors in the UK were conducted to address the following three research questions. First, how do line managers perceive diversity management? Second, what are the actual roles and responsibilities of line managers in shaping diversity practices' implementation? Third, how do leadership interactions within the organisation influence line managers' perceptions of diversity practices?

Findings

Line managers present high levels of personal determination and commitment towards diversity supplemented by a consensus on the strategic role of leadership in relation to diversity management. In addition, poor levels of organisational support, leadership values and style are identified; all highly related to their ability to deliver results and, most importantly, to form effective relationships in the workplace.

Research limitations/implications

Data included line managers' views but not senior managers' perspectives, thus limiting the study in identifying the holistic impact of social exchanges in shaping effective relations. In addition, quantitative research could test and enhance the generalisability of existing findings.

Practical implications

Investing in social relationships can positively influence line managers' ability to deliver results. Action is required at the organisational level by senior management to support and recognise line managers' critical roles to enable them to apply and promote diversity management.

Originality/value

These findings address a theoretical gap relating to the evaluation of the critical role played by line managers in the delivery of diversity practices. The study further demonstrates how social exchange relationships can influence line managers' perceptions of diversity management, an unexplored area within the diversity literature.

Details

Employee Relations: The International Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

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Article
Publication date: 16 August 2021

Moncef Guizani and Gaafar Abdalkrim

This study aims to explore the role of board gender diversity in enhancing the allocation of free cash flow (FCF). It examines the direct effect of board gender diversity

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore the role of board gender diversity in enhancing the allocation of free cash flow (FCF). It examines the direct effect of board gender diversity, as well as its indirect effect, through debt and dividend policies, on the level of FCF.

Design/methodology/approach

This study applies a three-stage least squares regression analysis for a sample of 367 Malaysian listed firms over the period 2011–2019.

Findings

The results show that female directors significantly deter the opportunistic behavior of managers. The authors find that gender diversity – as measured by the percentage of women on the board and the percentage of female independent directors are likely to reduce excess funds. Moreover, the results reveal a significant indirect effect of board gender diversity, through dividend payouts, on the efficient allocation of FCF. The results are consistent with those in prior studies that document the benefits of board gender diversity.

Practical implications

The research findings are beneficial to policymakers, as it allows them to assess the importance of diversity on boards in the monitoring of the managers, particularly as it pertains to the allocation of excess funds. Furthermore, these findings have implications for regulators as they shed light on the importance to undertake measures and reforms to promote board effectiveness by the introduction of gender diversity.

Originality/value

While prior research has examined the effect of board gender diversity on firm performance, the study is the first to investigate both the direct and indirect effect of board gender diversity on the allocation of FCF.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

Keywords

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