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Article

Esyin Chew

In response to the less satisfied National Student Survey, UK universities have committed to transform assessment and feedback experience. This paper aims to explore how

Abstract

Purpose

In response to the less satisfied National Student Survey, UK universities have committed to transform assessment and feedback experience. This paper aims to explore how the diversity of online assessment and feedback offer a better learning experience for international students.

Design/methodology/approach

By using the action research method, the research investigated academic and international students' first experience on audio feedback and online text. Video interviews and online questionnaires were carried out.

Findings

All research participants would like to receive assessment feedback in audio form. This reflects the learning experience of students and suggests that the support of a higher educational institution or a tutor could provide for assessment and feedback enhancement in the digital world is mandatory. Other than the technological and instrumental advantage, the “human element” of audio feedback makes it unique and interesting to listen to in contrast to online written feedback.

Research limitations/implications

It is recognised that the number of student participants was small but the qualitative findings demonstrate some key issues in relation to international student experience and the effectiveness and engagement of assessment feedback that may inspire future empirical research.

Practical implications

Some conditions under which feedback is likely to be effective are not met as frequently as originally believed, audio feedback can be thoughtfully considered as an alternative assessment feedback mechanism for international students.

Originality/value

The “‘human element’ of audio assessment feedback” defeats online written text for international students. They appreciate the effort spent by the tutor to provide them assessment and feedback personally by “talking to them”.

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Article

José González, Wenwei Yu and Alejandro Hernandez Arieta

It is widely agreed that amputees have to rely on visual input to monitor and control the position of the prosthesis while reaching and grasping because of the lack of…

Abstract

Purpose

It is widely agreed that amputees have to rely on visual input to monitor and control the position of the prosthesis while reaching and grasping because of the lack of proprioceptive feedback. Therefore, visual information has been a prerequisite for prosthetic hand biofeedback studies. This is why, the underlying characteristics of other artificial feedback methods used to this day, such as auditive, electro‐tactile, or vibro‐tactile feedback, has not been clearly explored. The purpose of this paper is to explore whether it is possible to use audio feedback alone to convey more than one independent variable (multichannel) simultaneously, without relying on the vision, to improve the learning of a new perceptions, in this case, to learn and understand the artificial proprioception of a prosthetic hand while reaching.

Design/methodology/approach

Experiments are conducted to determine whether the audio signals could be used as a multi‐variable dynamical sensory substitution in reaching movements without relying on the visual input. Two different groups are tested, the first one uses only audio information and the second one uses only visual information to convey computer‐simulated trajectories of two fingers.

Findings

The results show that it is possible to use auditive feedback to convey artificial proprioceptive information instead of vision as a guide, thus assist users by internalizing new perceptions.

Originality/value

This way, the strong and weak points of auditive feedback can be observed and can be used to improve future feedback systems or schemes, which can integrate different feedback methods to provide more information to the user.

Details

Industrial Robot: An International Journal, vol. 37 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-991X

Keywords

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Book part

Michael Truong and Anne Zanzucchi

In this chapter, we explore how new technologies, namely, video essays, audio-based feedback, and electronic portfolios, can transform traditional composition curriculum…

Abstract

In this chapter, we explore how new technologies, namely, video essays, audio-based feedback, and electronic portfolios, can transform traditional composition curriculum and deepen student learning. We begin by discussing how new technologies connect and enhance learning experiences, especially within writing-intensive courses. For each of the three technologies, we provide a brief literature review, give a local case study, and conclude with suggested applications and related resources.

Details

Increasing Student Engagement and Retention Using Social Technologies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-239-4

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Article

Catherine Todd, Swati Mallya, Sara Majeed, Jude Rojas and Katy Naylor

VirtuNav is a haptic-, audio-enabled virtual reality simulator that facilitates persons with visual impairment to explore a 3D computer model of a real-life indoor…

Abstract

Purpose

VirtuNav is a haptic-, audio-enabled virtual reality simulator that facilitates persons with visual impairment to explore a 3D computer model of a real-life indoor location, such as a room or building. The purpose of this paper is to aid in pre-planning and spatial awareness, for a user to become more familiar with the environment prior to experiencing it in reality.

Design/methodology/approach

The system offers two unique interfaces: a free-roam interface where the user can navigate, and an edit mode where the administrator can manage test users, maps and retrieve test data.

Findings

System testing reveals that spatial awareness and memory mapping improve with user iterations within VirtuNav.

Research limitations/implications

VirtuNav is a research tool for investigation of user familiarity developed after repeated exposure to the simulator, to determine the extent to which haptic and/or sound cues improve a visually impaired user’s ability to navigate a room or building with or without occlusion.

Social implications

The application may prove useful for greater real world engagement: to build confidence in real world experiences, enabling persons with sight impairment to more comfortably and readily explore and interact with environments formerly unfamiliar or unattainable to them.

Originality/value

VirtuNav is developed as a practical application offering several unique features including map design, semi-automatic 3D map reconstruction and object classification from 2D map data. Visual and haptic rendering of real-time 3D map navigation are provided as well as automated administrative functions for shortest path determination, actual path comparison, and performance indicator assessment: exploration time taken and collision data.

Details

Journal of Assistive Technologies, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-9450

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Article

Maria Ghosn-Chelala and Wessam Al-Chibani

The purpose of this paper is to explore screencasting as a computer-mediated feedback approach for Arabic native (L1) speakers taking an English as a foreign language…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore screencasting as a computer-mediated feedback approach for Arabic native (L1) speakers taking an English as a foreign language (EFL) college remedial writing class.

Design/methodology/approach

This case study focused on an EFL remedial writing class consisting of eight Lebanese, Arabic L1 students at a private university in Lebanon. Students received screencast feedback through Jing® for one essay intended to assist them with subsequent revision. The multimodal screencast videos included indirect corrections, annotations, and oral commentary guided by a rubric. Students then completed a perspectives survey on screencast feedback. The instructor also led an informal group discussion to allow for further elaboration of students’ responses.

Findings

Students reported that screencasting’s multimodality provided for better engagement and support of learning preferences. They also perceived screencast feedback to be clearer and more useful than traditional written feedback.

Research limitations/implications

This study applied screencasting to address feedback challenges pertaining to clarity, learning preferences, and engagement. As this was a classroom case study, further research using a larger sample is recommended.

Originality/value

The aim of research into computer-mediated human feedback is to address such challenges as increasing student engagement, improving clarity, and responding to students’ preferences. Studies of screencast feedback have been few, particularly for EFL writing students. A survey of the literature indicates the need to explore contextualized classroom feedback case studies and approaches to enhance feedback.

Details

The International Journal of Information and Learning Technology, vol. 35 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4880

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Article

Orly Lahav

The purpose of this paper is to examine the past 15 years of research and development (R&D) on the role of virtual environments (VEs) as an orientation and mobility (O&M…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the past 15 years of research and development (R&D) on the role of virtual environments (VEs) as an orientation and mobility (O&M) aid to enhance skills and to train people who are blind or newly blind.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper describes and examines studies of 21 VE systems developed specifically to help people who are blind improve their O&M skills. These VE systems, equipped to supply appropriate perceptual and conceptual spatial information through haptic and auditory sensorial channels, are mainly focussed on two goals: helping congenitally blind or late blind persons to collect spatial information in advance and supporting people who are newly blind in practicing their O&M skills during rehabilitation. The R&D studies represented in these 21 studies were examined along three dimensions: descriptive information, system, and research.

Findings

This paper highlights weaknesses and strengths of VE systems that have been developed in the past 15 years as O&M aids for people who are blind. These results have the potential to influence future R&D in this field.

Originality/value

The author hopes that this paper will influence future R&D in this field and lead to accessible O&M VEs in practice and research.

Details

Journal of Assistive Technologies, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-9450

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Kybernetes, vol. 32 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

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Article

Doris U. Bolliger and Florence Martin

The purpose of this research study is to validate an instrument that measures the importance instructors and students place on online student engagement strategies.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research study is to validate an instrument that measures the importance instructors and students place on online student engagement strategies.

Design/methodology/approach

The online student engagement strategies survey was completed by 160 faculty and 146 students. The data were analysed using descriptive statistics and an exploratory factor analysis. The factor structure was examined using a principal component analysis with an oblique rotation.

Findings

Results show that the Online Engagement Strategies Questionnaire has a valid and reliable structure. Based on the exploratory factor analysis, four engagement constructs emerged including peer engagement, multimodal engagement, instructor engagement, and self-directed engagement. Results and discussion assist in identifying key engagement strategies within this online student engagement framework.

Originality/value

The validated instrument fills a gap in the literature, and it has value to practitioners, researchers, administrators and policy makers because it has practical applications.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

Keywords

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Article

Mohammad Alawamleh, Lana Mohannad Al-Twait and Gharam Raafat Al-Saht

This study aims to explore whether online learning has an effect on communication between instructors and students in a negative way, whether online learning affects…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore whether online learning has an effect on communication between instructors and students in a negative way, whether online learning affects students' productivity levels and to evaluate and suggest ways of improving effective online communication between instructors and students.

Design/methodology/approach

This study used is a quantitative research study which was conducted through a semi-structured online survey through a random sample technique.

Findings

Results revealed that the vast majority agree with the questions of the study. Students still prefer classroom classes over online classes due to many problems they face when taking online classes, such as lack of motivation, understanding of the material, decrease in communication levels between the students and their instructors and their feeling of isolation caused by online classes.

Research limitations/implications

This research studied the impact from students' perspective only as the sample was selected only from students.

Originality/value

This research reached the students’ point of view in a broader way which will help understanding the issues and provide effective solutions. This research suggested that instructors must communicate with their students and vice versa in more informal channels (instant messages online chat groups, audio calls, private video calls …) in parallel with the formal channels (online platforms, email …). Finally, instructors should encourage students to participate and study more by providing different kind of incentives.

Details

Asian Education and Development Studies, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-3162

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Article

Francesca Ostuzzi and Maya Hoveskog

Teaching sustainable development at the higher education level requires that existing curricula are supplemented with multi-disciplinary (and sometimes multi-national…

Abstract

Purpose

Teaching sustainable development at the higher education level requires that existing curricula are supplemented with multi-disciplinary (and sometimes multi-national) collaboration and integrated thinking. The purpose of this paper is to increase the understanding of a particular framework for business model innovation for sustainability-as-flourishing that is used as a boundary object in the context of interdisciplinary, peer-assessed distance learning. This study is positioned in the broader picture of enlarging curricular content so as to reflect the systemic and interconnected nature of socio-technical and economic developments. The motivation behind this study is the authors’ wish to achieve a deeper understanding of how students engage with the complex concept of sustainable business modelling, while using the flourishing business canvas (FBC).

Design/methodology/approach

An experiment was conducted on the use of the FBC as a boundary object among 52 engineering students at two universities. Data were provided by the following: iterations of the FBC; oral and written peer feedback; and an online survey.

Findings

Based on an evaluation of the experiment, this study shows that the FBC supports the use of multi-disciplinary, multi-national peer and distance learning in sustainability education.

Research limitations/implications

This study used one test condition of multi-disciplinary, multi-national collaboration for peer and distance learning at one point in time. Additional tests, using the tools and approaches of this study, are needed.

Originality/value

Various tools and methods for use in education have been developed that support a new view of sustainability –sustainability-as-flourishing. Extant research focusses primarily on the development of tools and methods in this area. Not enough attention has been paid to the analysis of their implementation and use in higher education. This paper seeks to fill that research gap.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

Keywords

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