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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1981

“Streets broad and narrow”. In terms of shops and retail trade, it was always the narrow streets of town centres which attracted the trade, although the shops were small…

Abstract

“Streets broad and narrow”. In terms of shops and retail trade, it was always the narrow streets of town centres which attracted the trade, although the shops were small cramped for space, but always a cosy, friendly air. Few ever became vacant and although interspersing chain shops seemed to break the rhythm, most were privately owned, run through the years by generations of the same family. The shops removed the proverbial meanness of narrow streets; the lights, the shopping crowds, especially on Saturday nights; shop frontmen bawling their prices, the new boys calling the late editions—all this made shopping an attractive outing; it still does. There were the practical advantages of being able to cross and re‐cross the street, with many shops on both sides within the field of vision. The broad highway had none of these things and it was extremely rare for shops to exist both sides of the street, and still less to flourish. It is much the same to this day. Hygiene purists would find much to fault, but it was what the public wanted and curiously, there was very little food poisoning; it would be untrue to say outbreaks never occurred but they were extremely rare.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 83 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 30 April 2018

Sepideh Yosefzadeh Sani, Sayed Ali Mortazavi, Zahra Sheikholeslami, Mehdi Karimi and Amir Hossein Elhamirad

In the past decades, the desire to use natural source foods has increased because of environmental compatibility, safety and appropriate costs. Sonication is used in food…

Abstract

Purpose

In the past decades, the desire to use natural source foods has increased because of environmental compatibility, safety and appropriate costs. Sonication is used in food industry owing to its short duration of process and saving energy. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of various maize starches in the batter on the oil absorption and quality assessment (moisture content) of chicken nuggets by using five mathematical models.

Design/methodology/approach

To determine the effects of different maize starches on oil absorption parameters, 5 per cent starches native, sonicated starch were substituted in batter instead of wheat flour. Suspensions contained native starch were treated with sonication (70 kHz, 5 min) using an ultrasound probe set. Samples were fried in a fryer at 150, 170 and 190°C for 1, 3and 5 min, respectively. Models were compared with R2 and Arrhenius equation for estimating model prediction sufficiency.

Findings

Obtained results represented that between different formulated samples, maize starch with high temperature had main significant effect (p < 0.05) on moisture content of nuggets. During frying, the amount of oil loses significantly (p < 0.05) depended on temperature and time and sonication treatment.

Originality/value

Incorporation of sonication with maize starch at higher temperature on quality assessment has not been found.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 48 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1993

S.G. Ring

Starch is a valued structural component of many foods. Considersthe behaviour of starch as a macronutrient and as a structural componentof food materials.

Abstract

Starch is a valued structural component of many foods. Considers the behaviour of starch as a macronutrient and as a structural component of food materials.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 93 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 11 July 2016

Marta Aurelia Horianski, Juan Manuel Peralta and Luis Alberto Brumovsky

The purpose of this study was to analyze the influence of epichlorohydrin (ECH) concentration and reaction time on the food-grade resistant starch production and its…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to analyze the influence of epichlorohydrin (ECH) concentration and reaction time on the food-grade resistant starch production and its pasting properties by using native cassava starch of Misiones-Argentina origin.

Design/methodology/approach

Cassava starch was modified using ECH (0.30 and 0.15 per cent) during 4 or 8 h. Digestibility was evaluated by determining resistant starch as total dietary fiber. Pasting properties and the cross-linking degree were studied using a micro-viscoamylograph (Brabender).

Findings

Resistant starch content was not influenced by ECH concentration and reaction time. Cross-linking was detected at higher reaction times (8 h) and ECH concentrations (0.30 per cent), where a decrease in viscosity peaks by more than 80 per cent was observed. Both pasting temperature and breakdown were increased, whereas a decrease in retrogradation was detected.

Practical implications

Starches can be suitable for different food applications. This is because of the ability to modify its pasting properties and the invariability of the in vitro digestibility of cassava starch as a result of using ECH (at concentrations approved by local and regional legislation) and reaction times of 4 and 8 h.

Originality/value

Information related to the modification of cassava starch using ECH is scarce or not available nowadays in literature.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 46 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1985

The formulated proposals for this legal principle in the trade battern of the European Community have again appeared in the EEC draft Directive. It has been many years in…

Abstract

The formulated proposals for this legal principle in the trade battern of the European Community have again appeared in the EEC draft Directive. It has been many years in coming, indicating the extreme difficulties encountered in bringing some sort of harmony in the different laws of Member‐states including those of the United Kingdom, relating to the subject. Over the years there were periods of what appeared to be complete inactivity, when no progress was being made, when consultations were at a stand‐still, but the situation was closely monitored by manufacturers of goods, including food and drink, in the UK and the BFJ published fairly detailed reviews of proposals being considered — in 1979 and 1981; and even as recently as the last few months — in “Consumerism in the Community”, the subject was briefly discussed.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 87 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1974

C.T. Greenwood

Starch is the food‐reserve material of all higher plants, where it is stored in the form of characteristic, cold water‐insoluble particles known as starch granules. As…

Abstract

Starch is the food‐reserve material of all higher plants, where it is stored in the form of characteristic, cold water‐insoluble particles known as starch granules. As starches are polymers of glucose, which are readily assimilated, they form an important source of nutritional energy in the human diet. Indeed, a very high proportion of the world's food energy‐intake is as starch, and cultivation of plant sources rich in this polysaccharide are widespread. 82% of all food crops are composed of cereals and starchy root‐crops.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 74 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2013

Kh. M. Mostafa and A. A. El-Sanabary

Several research and developmental work attempts have been made in this manuscript to synthesize what is called tailored polymeric materials with new characteristics based…

Abstract

Several research and developmental work attempts have been made in this manuscript to synthesize what is called tailored polymeric materials with new characteristics based on pregelled starch through a number of processes which, in turn, entail several chemical treatments. This is done by subjecting pregelled starch as a starting substrate to acid hydrolysis to obtain different molecular sizes. Pregelled starch with different molecular sizes are carbamoylethylated by using acrylamide and sodium hydroxide at different durations, then grafted with different monomers by using a potassium permanganate/citric acid redox system to initiate grafting. Furthermore, application of the newly tailored pregelled starch derived products as a sizing agent of cotton textiles is systematically studied. It is shown from the data that (a) the extent of carbamoylethylation expressed as N% increases by increasing the extent of hydrolysis and duration; (b) the graft yield expressed as mmol. monomer/100 g sample of different monomers onto carbamoylethylated and carbamoylethylated hydrolyzed pregelled starches increases by increasing the extent of carbamoylethylation and degree of hydrolysis, and follows the order: methacrylamide (MAam) > methacrylonitrile (MAN) > methacrylic acid (MAA), and (c) cotton fabrics sized with grafted carbamoylethylated hydrolyzed pregelled starch acquire higher mechanical properties, i.e. TS, elongation at break, and abrasion resistance values than hydrolyzed, carbamoylethylated and carbamoylethylated hydrolyzed pregelled starches. Finally, the use of the above tailored modified pregelled starch derived products in the sizing of cotton textiles contribute to reinforcement of the cotton textile after sizing to overcome the forced loss in fabrics/yarns during the spinning process as shown above.

Details

Research Journal of Textile and Apparel, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1560-6074

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1997

A. Hebeish, A. Waly, F.A. Abdel‐Mohdy and A.S. Aly

Carbamoylethyl starch (CrES) and cyanoethyl starch (CES) were prepared by making use of the concept of the dry process under conditions which were developed to form the…

Abstract

Carbamoylethyl starch (CrES) and cyanoethyl starch (CES) were prepared by making use of the concept of the dry process under conditions which were developed to form the bases of environmentally sound (clean) technology. The obtained CrES and CES were saponified using alcoholic NaOH solution. The CrES and CES along with their saponified products were further modified by subjecting them to graft polymerization with Aam/AN mixture. Saponification of the so‐obtained grafted substances was also carried out. Presents the findings of these investigations which are explained in terms of structural changes in the starch, the ‐CN and CONH2 groups, the Aam/AN polymeric graft and the site of attachment of the latter on the modified starch.

Details

Pigment & Resin Technology, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0369-9420

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Article
Publication date: 2 December 2019

Joseph Woomer, Manjot Singh, Paul Priyesh Vijayakumar and Akinbode Adedeji

Gluten-free (GF) foods have gained momentum among consumers due to an increase in incidence and awareness of gluten sensitivity and intolerance. Millet is a GF grain with…

Abstract

Purpose

Gluten-free (GF) foods have gained momentum among consumers due to an increase in incidence and awareness of gluten sensitivity and intolerance. Millet is a GF grain with nutritive qualities comparable to other cereals. However, it was not clear how millet-based GF products would be accepted, leading to the goal of this research. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to evaluate the effect of formulation on physical properties and consumer preference of millet-based GF bread.

Design/methodology/approach

Three bread formulations were used: proso millet flour (100 percent), proso millet flour–corn starch (1:1), and proso millet flour–potato starch (1:1). Physical and sensory properties were statistically evaluated.

Findings

Starch addition to the bread formulation had a significant influence on bread volume, color and firmness. A consumer’s age, gluten intolerance and familiarity with millet products did influence the frequency of consumption of GF products. Gluten-intolerant panelists consumed GF products more often than others who are not. Older panelists reported consuming more GF products than younger panelists. Gender also had a significant effect on consumers’ preference for overall acceptability and crumb aroma. The formulation had a significant effect on consumers’ preference of crust color and crumb aroma.

Practical implications

The paper presents an understanding of how starch addition modulates bread properties for the GF market.

Originality/value

In this paper, the authors explored a novel approach to use different starches and proso millet for making GF bread and determined sensory responses based on demographics like age, celiac diagnosis and familiarity with GF foods. This vital information will help processors to determine the portion of the market to target and the formulation to explore further.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 122 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1902

Certain daily papers have recently made a discovery of such importance that they have been compelled to deal with it in leading and special articles. From a report of the…

Abstract

Certain daily papers have recently made a discovery of such importance that they have been compelled to deal with it in leading and special articles. From a report of the Local Government Board they appear to have just learned that the milk supply of the Metropolis is more adulterated than that of the provinces, and that the cost to the consumer—of water sold as milk in London alone—amounts to at least £30,000 sterling annually.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 4 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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