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Article
Publication date: 8 May 2017

Radu Dimitriu, Luk Warlop and Bendik Meling Samuelsen

The purpose of this paper is to show that high similarity between a parent brand and an extension category can have a detrimental effect on how a brand extension is…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to show that high similarity between a parent brand and an extension category can have a detrimental effect on how a brand extension is perceived to perform on specific attributes. This happens because similarity influences the perceived positioning of a brand extension: lower similarity extensions can be perceived as “specialized” products, whereas high similarity extensions are perceived as “all-in-one” products not performing exceptionally well on any specific attribute.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors test the hypothesized effect through three experimental studies. The authors manipulate similarity both within subjects (Study 1a) and between subjects (Study 1b and Study 2). Further, the authors test the effect for specific attributes that are physical/concrete in nature (Study 1a and Study 1b) as well as attributes that are abstract/imagery-related in nature (Study 2).

Findings

High compared to low similarity improves perceptions of overall performance (i.e. performance across all attributes). But as expected, the authors also find that a high similarity brand extension is perceived to perform worse on the attribute on which a low similarity brand extension specializes, even when the parent brands of the extensions possess that attribute to the same extent. This perception of attribute performance carries on to influence brand extension purchase likelihood.

Practical implications

The degree of brand extension similarity has consequences for how brand extensions are perceived to be positioned in the marketplace. Although high similarity extensions receive positive evaluations, they might not be suitable when a company is trying to instil a perception of exceptional performance on a specific attribute.

Originality/value

The authors demonstrate a consequential exception to the marketing wisdom that brands should extend to similar categories. Although the degree of brand extension similarity has been repeatedly shown to have a positive effect on brand extension evaluation, the authors document a case when its effect is actually detrimental. This study’s focus on the dependent variable of perceived performance on specific attributes is novel in the brand extension literature.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 51 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 24 August 2020

Martin Edward Haran, Daniel Lo, Michael McCord, Peadar Davis and Lay Cheng Lim

The purpose of this paper is to test the extent to which company-specific attributes including market capitalisation, capital structure and investment focus impact upon…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to test the extent to which company-specific attributes including market capitalisation, capital structure and investment focus impact upon the performance of European listed real estate companies. Enhanced understanding of firm-level performance drivers is important for investors in order to diversify their investment portfolios and to mitigate company-specific risks at different points in the real estate cycle.

Design/methodology/approach

The study centres on six key listed European real estate markets selected on the basis of market capitalisation, diversity, transparency and maturity. A series of statistical tests are undertaken using EPRA and Bloomberg data for the period of 2007–2017 using 113 listed property companies, all of whom were contemporaneous constituents of EPRA indices in this period. A series of customised performance indices were constructed to evaluate firm-level performance attributes.

Findings

Firm-level attributes collectively account for more variation of risk-adjusted return than sector-level attributes over the investigation period. The impact of firm-specific attributes on performance varies significantly from country to country attributable to the contrasting cyclical property market trends in the pre– and post–Global Financial Crisis period. REITs outperformed non-REITs on a risk-adjusted basis attributed to the strong performance of “niche” market entrants allied with stronger regulatory structure. Finally, the findings showcase that sector specialist firms outperform diversified companies inferring that investors should seek to attain diversification through portfolio-based approaches rather than firm-level strategies.

Practical implications

The results have implications for real estate companies aiming to raise capital internally for growth as higher return on equity in general signals reduced cost of capital. Secondly, the findings should be of practical use to multinationals specialising in international real estate trading in designing their business plans in general and formulating cross-country investment strategies in particular. Last but not least, a more refined conceptualisation of corporate-level performance drivers should complement existing professional practices in relation to business/company appraisal.

Originality/value

The research integrates EPRA and Bloomberg data sets to create a series of bespoke index constructs to measure the impact of firm-specific attributes on European listed real estate companies. Additionally, the authors construct a Herfindahl Index (H.I.) to further the debate on the impacts of diversification within the listed real estate sector. This serves to further heighten investor understanding of investment allocation and portfolio optimisation strategies for the listed real estate sector given the increasingly diverse range of investment opportunities within emerging sub-markets.

Details

Journal of Property Investment & Finance, vol. 39 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-578X

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Article
Publication date: 4 September 2019

Abiodun Olatunji Abisuga, Cynthia Changxin Wang and Riza Yosia Sunindijo

This paper aims to identify user-centred facilities performance attributes of higher education buildings and how they can be used to evaluate individual learning spaces…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to identify user-centred facilities performance attributes of higher education buildings and how they can be used to evaluate individual learning spaces. These attributes are then consolidated for developing a post-occupancy evaluation (POE) framework in this context.

Design/methodology/approach

A systematic review of the literature on the POE of higher education buildings is conducted.

Findings

This study identifies 36 facility performance attributes in higher education buildings, which can be categorised into four dimensions: ambient; spatial; technology; and building support and services requirements. These facility performance attributes need to meet user requirements to achieve satisfactory feedback. It is also important to note that user requirements differ from one learning space to another; thus, it is essential to consider the characteristics of individual learning spaces.

Research limitations/implications

The proposed evaluation framework is context-based and may not be suitable to evaluate other types of buildings. It may be further extended and enhanced to meet other facility management evaluation needs.

Practical implications

The POE framework developed in this research can be used to generate facilities management analytic to inform future design and improve existing higher education facilities.

Originality/value

This research has developed a holistic POE framework tool to meet user requirements in higher education buildings.

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2003

Jochen Wirtz

Firms usually measure customer satisfaction on an attribute‐by‐attribute basis in order to identify and improve potential weaknesses, and to fortify their strengths in…

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4532

Abstract

Firms usually measure customer satisfaction on an attribute‐by‐attribute basis in order to identify and improve potential weaknesses, and to fortify their strengths in service delivery. However, research has shown that halo can threaten the interpretability of such data. Also, halo is particularly acute in satisfaction measurement of services with a high degree of ambiguous and credence attributes. This paper examines three halo‐reducing methods developed in psychology and organizational behavior in the context of customer satisfaction. The perceived purpose of evaluation (evaluative vs developmental) and the number of attributes measured (few vs many) were examined in an experimental design, and the level of product involvement (low vs high) was examined using a quasi‐experimental design. The data showed reduced halo when the respondents were presented with a developmental rather than evaluative purpose, when more rather than fewer attributes were measured, and when subjects were highly involved with the service.

Details

International Journal of Service Industry Management, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-4233

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Article
Publication date: 10 July 2017

Fraser McLeay, Andrew Robson and Mazirah Yusoff

The constantly evolving higher education (HE) sector is creating a need for new business models and tools for evaluating performance. In this paper, an overview of the…

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1058

Abstract

Purpose

The constantly evolving higher education (HE) sector is creating a need for new business models and tools for evaluating performance. In this paper, an overview of the importance-performance analysis (IPA) model and its applicability as a management tool for assessing student satisfaction in the HE sector is provided. The purpose of this paper is to apply IPA in a new and novel manner, undertaking analysis at three levels; the individual student, for individual attributes and at a construct or factor level which combines individual attributes that are correlated. A practical application is illustrated, assessing the gap between the importance placed on specific student satisfaction attributes and corresponding levels of student-perceived performance realised.

Design/methodology/approach

The “service product bundle” (Douglas et al., 2006) is refined based on focus group evaluation. Survey responses from 823 students studying across four Malaysian private universities are analysed using factor analysis and the IPA model utilised to identify importance-performance gaps and explore the implication of the iso-rating line as well as alternative cut-off zones.

Findings

Factor reduction of 33 original measurement items results in eight definable areas of service provision, which provides a refined and extended management tool of statistically reliable and valid constructs.

Research limitations/implications

The research is undertaken in a private business school context in Malaysia. Further research could focus on other universities or countries, as well as faculties such as computing and engineering or explore other elements of education-based performance.

Practical implications

The research method and study outcomes can support HE managers to allocate resources more effectively and develop strategies to improve quality and increase student satisfaction.

Originality/value

Distinct from other IPA-based studies, analysis is undertaken at three levels; the individual participant, for individual items and at the factor level.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 36 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 25 March 2019

Dian Prama Irfani, Dermawan Wibisono and Mursyid Hasan Basri

Companies with multiple roles, as both a profit generator and public service provider, have specific characteristics that differentiate them from single-role companies…

Abstract

Purpose

Companies with multiple roles, as both a profit generator and public service provider, have specific characteristics that differentiate them from single-role companies. However, literature suggests that no performance measurement framework exists to fully suit the characteristics of such companies. This study aims to develop a novel performance-measuring framework to manage logistics performance in multiple-role companies.

Design/methodology/approach

The framework is developed by combining a literature review and a case study approach as applied to a company with multiple roles. The case study is conducted to identify the characteristics of multiple-role companies, the factors that potentially affect such companies’ logistics performance and criteria for a new framework. The literature review identifies the concepts, performance attributes and indicators from existing frameworks with the potential for incorporation and synthesis in the new framework.

Findings

This study identified several characteristics, performance drivers and criteria for a logistics performance-measuring framework for multiple-role companies. Additionally, this study successfully developed a new logistics performance-measuring framework that consists of eight performance management stages and an aggregated index to measure overall logistics performance.

Practical implications

The proposed logistics performance-measuring methodology provides useful guidance for stakeholders of multiple-role companies to plan, organize, execute and evaluate logistics performance.

Originality/value

This research fills a theoretical gap by explaining the characteristics of logistics systems in multiple-role companies, as well as the factors that may affect such companies’ logistics performance. Further, the proposed framework contributes to academia by integrating performance attributes from several available frameworks to manage objective conflicts, dynamism issues and the inconsistent performance evaluations that exist in companies with multiple roles.

Details

Measuring Business Excellence, vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-3047

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Article
Publication date: 14 April 2020

Axel Yezeguelian and Askin T. Isikveren

When comparing and contrasting different types of fixed-wing military aircraft on the basis of an energetic efficiency figure-of-merit, unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs…

Abstract

Purpose

When comparing and contrasting different types of fixed-wing military aircraft on the basis of an energetic efficiency figure-of-merit, unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) dedicated to tactical medium-altitude long-endurance (MALE) operations appear to have significant potential when hybrid-electric propulsion and power systems (HEPPS) are implemented. Beginning with a baseline Eulair drone, this paper aims to examine the feasibility of retro-fitting with an Autarkic-Parallel-HEPPS architecture to enhance performance of the original single diesel engine.

Design/methodology/approach

In view of the low gravimetric specific energy performance attributes of batteries in the foreseeable future, the best approach was found to be one in which the Parallel-HEPPS architecture has the thermal engine augmented by an organic rankine cycle (ORC). For this study, with the outer mould lines fixed, the goal was to increase endurance without increasing the Eulair drone maximum take-off weight beyond an upper limit of +10%. The intent was to also retain take-off distance and climb performance or, where possible, improve upon these aspects. Therefore, as the focus of the work was on power scheduling, two primary control variables were identified as degree-of-hybridisation for useful power and cut-off altitude during the en route climb phase. Quasi-static methods were used for technical sub-space modelling, and these modules were linked into a constrained optimisation algorithm.

Findings

Results showed that an Autarkic-Parallel-HEPPS architecture comprising an ORC thermal energy recovery apparatus and high-end year-2020 battery, the endurance of the considered aircraft could be increased by 11%, i.e. a total of around 28 h, including de-icing system, in-flight recharge and emergency aircraft recovery capabilities. The same aircraft with the de-icing functionality removed resulted in a 20% increase in maximum endurance to 30 h.

Practical implications

Although the adoption of Series/Parallel-HEPPS only solutions do tend to generate questionable improvements in UAV operational performance, combinations of HEPPS with energy recovery machines that use, for example, an ORC, were found to have merit. Furthermore, such architectural solutions could also offer opportunity to facilitate additional functions like de-icing and emergency aircraft recovery during engine failure, which is either not available for UAVs today or prove to be prohibitive in terms of operational performance attributes when implemented using a conventional PPS approach.

Originality/value

This technical paper highlights a new degree of freedom in terms of power scheduling during climbing transversal flight operations. A control parameter of cut-off altitude for all types of HEPPS-based aircraft should be introduced into the technical decision-making/optimisation/analysis scheme and is seen to be a fundamental aspect when conducting trade-studies with respect to degree-of-hybridisation for useful power.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 92 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1748-8842

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2005

Pingjun Jiang and Bert Rosenbloom

Compared with the emphasis that service quality research has received in online marketing, much less work has been done on the role of price perception, service attribute

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20829

Abstract

Purpose

Compared with the emphasis that service quality research has received in online marketing, much less work has been done on the role of price perception, service attribute‐level performance and satisfaction that unfolds over time, and their effects on customer retention. This paper seeks to fill this gap in the literature.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper builds propositions about the role of price and customer satisfaction at different stages on customers' intention to return. Research hypotheses are developed based on theory from the combined literatures of services, product pricing, and behavioral decision theory. Data from the e‐retailing industry related to two specific periods of shopping experience (at checkout and after delivery) are used in the empirical tests. Structural equation modeling is employed to test the hypothesized relationships.

Findings

The findings of this study indicate that after‐delivery satisfaction has a much stronger influence on both overall customer satisfaction and intention to return than at‐checkout satisfaction, and that price perception, when measured on a comparative basis, has a direct and positive effect on customer overall satisfaction and intention to return.

Research limitations/implications

The data are only available from surveying customers who have made purchases. Future study can investigate how satisfaction with shopping convenience has impacted customer acquisition. Measures of actual return behavior, as opposed to behavioral intentions, will also enhance the validity of the study.

Practical implications

This paper concludes that excellence pre‐sales service is not necessarily an advantage that allows e‐tailers to develop customer retention. In fact, e‐tailers might command higher customer retention through providing good performance in after‐delivery service and continuously generating favorable price perceptions among customers because both have a strong and positive influence on return intention.

Originality/value

This research conceptualizes and explores different aspects of satisfaction that unfold over time, regarding customers' whole shopping experience with a particular e‐retailer. It is a pioneer work that empirically investigates the relative contribution of at‐checkout and after‐delivery satisfaction in generating intention to return to an e‐tailer.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 39 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 10 October 2016

Xiaojing Sheng, Judy A. Siguaw and Penny M. Simpson

The purpose of this paper is to empirically demonstrate an effective method for assessing how servicescape attributes shape consumer well-being and to highlight the value…

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4362

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to empirically demonstrate an effective method for assessing how servicescape attributes shape consumer well-being and to highlight the value of importance-performance analysis (IPA) within a services context.

Design/methodology/approach

This study surveyed frequent visitors to a travel destination to determine their perceived importance of and satisfaction with servicescape attributes. The responses were analyzed using a series of importance-performance analyses to determine the impact of each servicescape attribute on consumer well-being.

Findings

Key servicescape attributes contributing to the well-being of frequent visitors to a destination were identified. For example, weather; friendly residents; restaurants; and interaction with locals were identified as attributes with a “high impact” on well-being, although weather and friendly residents were satisfiers and restaurants and interaction with locals were identified as dissatisfiers. In total, 23 servicescape attributes were plotted on a matrix depicting each attribute’s range and type of impact.

Practical Implications

This study provides practitioners with an idea of which servicescape attributes are important in improving well-being and illustrates how IPA may be used to identify attributes of any transformative service. Additionally, the analysis helps managers prioritize servicescape attributes for a more ideal allocation of scarce resources. These findings should be applicable to various contexts.

Originality/value

This paper is the only known study to examine effects of servicescape attributes on consumer well-being and one of few to use the modified IPA in a services context.

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2002

Mike Bourne, Andy Neely, Ken Platts and John Mills

This paper investigates the success and failure of performance measurement system design interventions in ten companies. In each case, the senior management team was…

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12596

Abstract

This paper investigates the success and failure of performance measurement system design interventions in ten companies. In each case, the senior management team was facilitated through a management process to redesign their performance measurement systems. Analysis of the initial pilot case studies suggested three important differences between companies that proceeded to implement the measures agreed during the process and those that did not. Post intervention semi‐structured interviews with the directors and managers directly involved revealed two main perceived drivers of implementation and four perceived factors that block implementation. The results are of specific interest for performance measurement system implementation but have wider implications for our view of management commitment in change management.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 22 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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