Search results

1 – 10 of over 55000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 16 September 2013

Sumonta Kasemvilas and Lorne Olfman

– The purpose of this study was to design collaboration mechanisms for groups, particularly those who are performing mandatory collaborative writing of Wiki pages.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to design collaboration mechanisms for groups, particularly those who are performing mandatory collaborative writing of Wiki pages.

Design/methodology/approach

This research study utilized six design science research methodology steps. Two case studies were conducted to understand how a MediaWiki with additional extensions potentially facilitates collaborative writing. Questionnaires were used to collect answers to questions about perceived usefulness and perceived ease of use.

Findings

The findings from this research led to the innovative design of a set of MediaWiki mechanisms to improve collaborative writing in the classroom setting. The findings of the second round of the build-and-evaluate loop illustrate some potential impacts of MediaWiki when used in the classroom.

Research limitations/implications

These mechanisms would increase the students' sense of awareness, clarify management, increase discussion, and clarify students' roles. The implications of this study can be useful for researchers and developers. They can make use of what the study articulates the benefits and the needs of MediaWiki extensions.

Practical implications

The results of this study potentially offer new mechanisms that can be used to teach graduate students involved in collaborative writing.

Originality/value

The creation of the newly developed extensions is the original and innovative component of this study. These extensions are designed to increase project control and accountability.

Details

Interactive Technology and Smart Education, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-5659

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 15 June 2020

Camille Pluntz and Bernard Pras

Building strong human brands inscribed in social and symbolic recognition is a strategic issue for branded individuals. In the context of film director human brands, this…

Abstract

Purpose

Building strong human brands inscribed in social and symbolic recognition is a strategic issue for branded individuals. In the context of film director human brands, this study aims to examine the respective influences of the economic and critical performance of films, on the one hand, and the professional legitimacy bestowed by internal stakeholders, on the other, on changes in human brand identity. Contrary to what is generally believed, it shows that the specific legitimacy bestowed by producers and the institutional legitimacy bestowed by elite peers mediate the effects of performance on changes in human brand identity. Brand extension (i.e. new films) incongruence and initial human brand identity moderate the effect of performance on legitimacy.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is applied to film director human brands and to their extensions through the films they make. Data were collected for 81 films, including information before and after the brand extension occurs, to capture changes in human brand identity and extension effects.

Findings

The results show that economic performance influences both specific and institutional legitimacy, whereas critical performance only impacts institutional legitimacy. These relationships are moderated by initial human brand identity and congruence. Both types of professional legitimacies also help reinforce human brand identity.

Originality/value

The study challenges the role of performance on the building of human brand identity and shows that the latter is co-constructed by the branded individual and internal stakeholders. It also enhances the key roles of global incongruence and genre incongruence in the model.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 4 December 2018

Bekir Bora Dedeoğlu

This chapter sheds light on the ‘country of origin’ concept. The author contends that this concept is composed of micro- and macro-components. He argues that the tourists…

Abstract

This chapter sheds light on the ‘country of origin’ concept. The author contends that this concept is composed of micro- and macro-components. He argues that the tourists’ hedonic and monetary gratifications are derived from the travel experiences. Therefore, the country-of-origin image (COI) can have an impact on the destination’s brand extension. In this light, this contribution examines the relationship among COI, overall brand equity and brand extension. The author implies that the hedonic and monetary values can have a moderating effect on the impact of COI and on destination brand extension.

Details

The Branding of Tourist Destinations: Theoretical and Empirical Insights
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-373-9

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 29 April 2021

Dae-Kyoo Kim and Yeasun K. Chung

The authors use the extension mechanism provided by the Business Process Model and Notation (BPMN) to define roles, which allows roles to be fully aligned with the BPMN…

Abstract

Purpose

The authors use the extension mechanism provided by the Business Process Model and Notation (BPMN) to define roles, which allows roles to be fully aligned with the BPMN standard. The authors describe how a pattern can be defined in terms of roles and present the formal semantics of pattern realization and refinement to support systematic reuse of patterns in business process development.

Design/methodology/approach

It is widely agreed that the use of business process patterns improves the efficiency and quality of business process development. However, few techniques are available to describe business process patterns at an appropriate level of abstraction to facilitate the reuse of patterns. To address this, this paper presents the role-based Business Process Model and Notation (R-BPMN), an extension of BPMN for abstract modeling of business process patterns based on a novel notion of role.

Findings

The authors apply R-BPMN in case studies for pattern realization and refinement and discuss tool support via an existing tool. The case studies demonstrate the practical benefits of R-BPMN in capturing pattern variability and facilitating pattern reuse.

Practical implications

The findings imply a potential impact of R-BPMN on practical benefits when it is supported at the metamodel level in tool development.

Originality/value

This study addresses the need for abstract modeling of process patterns at the metamodel level, which facilitates the formalization of pattern variability and tool development to support various realizations of process patterns at the model level.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 27 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 8 August 2016

Graham Ferguson, Kong Cheen Lau and Ian Phau

Focusing on symbolic brands, this paper aims to re-test whether perceived â€∼fit’ between the personality of the parent brand, and the brand extension causes consumers to…

Downloads
4335

Abstract

Purpose

Focusing on symbolic brands, this paper aims to re-test whether perceived â€∼fit’ between the personality of the parent brand, and the brand extension causes consumers to the feel increased affect towards the brand extension. The contention is that high brand personality fit causes consumers to like the brand extension more because, like the parent brand, consumers can use the brand extension to maintain and project a desirable self-identity. This relationship is obscured because consumers process brand personality fit as part of the overall brand image fit; therefore, the potential mediating role of brand image is tested. Consumers differ in their self-monitoring disposition as well, which may explain differences in response to perceived personality fit. Therefore, the potential moderating role of self-monitoring is tested.

Design/methodology/approach

Using an experimental design, respondents viewed an advertisement for a brand extension that showed either congruent, moderately incongruent or incongruent personality fit with the parent brand. This was completed for four symbolic brands: two watch brands and two motor vehicle brands.

Findings

The results indicate that brand personality fit between the brand extension and the parent brand is causally related to affect felt towards the brand extension, but that this relationship is fully mediated by image fit for the BMW brand and partially mediated for Volkswagen Beetle, Omega and Swatch. For BMW and Swatch, the relationship between the independent variable personality fit and the mediator variable image fit is positively moderated by the self-monitoring disposition of the consumer.

Research limitations/implications

The implication is that, while marketers can communicate a wide range of attributes when advertising brand extensions, marketers of symbolic brands should clearly demonstrate brand personality fit as an important component of brand image fit. This is even more important for consumers with a high self-monitoring disposition.

Originality/value

The study conclusively tests the importance of personality fit for symbolic brands, the mediating role of brand image and the interaction effect of self-monitoring on personality fit. These findings contribute to the research literature and help marketers to manage the level of personality fit that should be emphasized in their marketing communications.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 33 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 6 April 2021

Hyunju Shin and Riza Casidy

In managing hierarchical loyalty programs (HLP), firms often use a reward point expiration and status demotion policy to reduce financial liability and to encourage repeat…

Abstract

Purpose

In managing hierarchical loyalty programs (HLP), firms often use a reward point expiration and status demotion policy to reduce financial liability and to encourage repeat purchases. This study aims to examine how point expiration and status demotion policies affect customer patronage, the role of extension strategies in mitigating the negative effects of these policies on customers and the moderating role of status endowment in the effect of point expiration on customers patronage following status demotion experience.

Design/methodology/approach

Three experiments were conducted using the hotel industry as the context. The hypothesized relationships were tested using ANOVA and a serial moderated mediation analysis using SPSS PROCESS Macro.

Findings

Customers subjected to reward point expiration exhibited a higher level of anger and perceived severity of the problem than those subjected to status demotion in HLP. Consequently, when customers experienced both point expiration and status demotion, the point extension strategy rather than the status extension strategy was found to be a more effective remedy for reducing perceived unfairness, although there was no change in the level of patronage reduction between the two extension strategies. Importantly, the effect of point expiration on patronage reduction was stronger among endowed-status customers than earned-status customers, serially driven by heightened feelings of embarrassment and perceived unfairness.

Originality/value

The study adds to the existing literature on HLP by comparing the effects of point expiration and status demotion on customer patronage with practical insights for HLP managers.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 11 October 2011

Jean Boisvert and Nick J. Ashill

The purpose of this study is twofold: first, to assess the impact of extension innovativeness on attitude towards service line extension and the mediating role played by…

Downloads
5066

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is twofold: first, to assess the impact of extension innovativeness on attitude towards service line extension and the mediating role played by extension quality (in relation to the parent brand); second, to examine the effect of consumer involvement as a moderator of the relationship between extension quality (in relation to the parent brand) and attitude towards the extension.

Design/methodology/approach

An empirical investigation using a survey methodology was conducted with a sample of 664 respondents. The structural model was assessed using partial least squares (PLS graph).

Findings

The results suggest that in launching a new service line extension perceived quality of the extension (in relation to the parent brand) has a direct impact on attitude towards the service line extension and mediates the effect of perceived extension innovativeness on extension attitude. The findings also suggest that consumer involvement in the extension moderates the relationship between extension quality (in relation to the parent brand) and attitude towards the extension.

Research limitations/implications

Line extensions of other types of services and consumer goods could be investigated in futures studies. Involvement is a multidimensional construct. Other dimensions of involvement could be tested in similar contexts.

Practical implications

This study is important for managers of newly created service branches. In launching a new service line extension, marketers must be careful in developing the quality of the service as well as managing its innovation as both factors influence attitude and behavioral intention outcomes. Also, the moderating role of involvement indicates that managers must attempt to reduce risk perceptions during launch.

Originality/value

The paper makes an important contribution to the emerging service line extension literature.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 16 August 2013

Kavita Srivastava and Narendra K. Sharma

The present study aims to investigate the impact of perceived quality, brand extension incongruity, involvement and perceived risk on consumer attitude towards brand…

Downloads
3012

Abstract

Purpose

The present study aims to investigate the impact of perceived quality, brand extension incongruity, involvement and perceived risk on consumer attitude towards brand extension across three product types, namely, FMCG, durable goods and service (FDS) sectors. More importantly, the study seeks to explore the importance of involvement profile comprising relevance, pleasure, sign‐value, risk importance and risk probability and perceived risk facets (financial, psychological and performance) in acceptance of brand extension across FDS.

Design/methodology/approach

Three questionnaire‐based surveys were conducted to collect the data for FMCG, durable and service brand extensions. Regression analyses and Chow test were computed to investigate differences in consumer evaluation across FDS.

Findings

Results revealed significant different effects of variables across the three product types. The impact of perceived quality was greater in the case of services than FMCG and durables. On the other hand, perceived risk and involvement had stronger influence on evaluation of durables and service than FMCG brand extensions.

Research limitations/implications

The present study gives a comprehensive view of how consumers evaluate the service and non‐service brand extensions.

Originality/value

The major contributions of this study are: generalization of the findings related to brand extension incongruity in the service area; examination of the multidimensional role of involvement in terms of relevance, pleasure, sign value, risk importance and risk probability in brand extension context across FMCG, durables and service product types; and exploration of the role of risk facets, namely, financial, performance and psychological in determining consumers' attitude towards brand extension.

Details

Journal of Indian Business Research, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4195

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 August 1997

Tim Ambler and Chris Styles

Considers the managerial processes that lead to the launch of successful line and brand extensions. Seeks to clarify the role, if any, that brand equity considerations…

Downloads
11115

Abstract

Considers the managerial processes that lead to the launch of successful line and brand extensions. Seeks to clarify the role, if any, that brand equity considerations have in the extension decision process. Uses a case study approach. Data relating to 11 extension launches were collected from major fast‐moving customer goods (FMCG) manufacturers in Europe, the USA, and Australia by The Boston Consulting Group (BCG). The output of the analysis is a set of propositions about the extension process, summarized in the form of a process model. Concludes overall that extension decisions are more about brand development than new product development.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 December 1996

Tim Ambler and Chris Styles

Considers the managerial processes that lead to the launch of successful line and brand extensions. Seeks to clarify the role, if any, that brand equity considerations…

Downloads
7825

Abstract

Considers the managerial processes that lead to the launch of successful line and brand extensions. Seeks to clarify the role, if any, that brand equity considerations have in the extension decision process. A case study approach is used. Data relating to 11 extension launches was collected from major fast‐moving customer goods (FMCG) manufacturers in Europe, the USA, and Australia by The Boston Consulting Group (BCG). The output of the analysis is a set of propositions about the extension process, summarized in the form of a process model. The overall conclusion is that extension decisions are more about brand development than new product development.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 14 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 55000