Search results

1 – 10 of over 4000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Bill Merrilees, Dale Miller and Raisa Yakimova

The purpose of this paper is to better understand the voice of the internal stakeholder in a way that emphasizes the internal stakeholder as an active force and decision…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to better understand the voice of the internal stakeholder in a way that emphasizes the internal stakeholder as an active force and decision maker in brand co-creation, as part of the new emerging paradigm of internal branding. The main aim is to understand the active role of volunteers in internal branding that is in the co-creation of value. A subsidiary aim is to understand why some volunteers engage deeply and seriously in a nonprofit organization while other volunteers seem less connected?

Design/methodology/approach

A conceptual framework incorporates several motivators to volunteer-led co-creation. A quantitative, co-variance-based structural equation modelling approach is used on survey data of a sample of 357 volunteers from 14 organizations in the Australian nonprofit sector.

Findings

The research findings contribute to the newly emerging internal branding literature focusing on the active co-creation role of internal stakeholders. The main drivers of volunteer co-creation are volunteer engagement, commitment, altruism, values-congruency and brand reputation. Different explanatory mechanisms/motivators apply to each type of volunteer-led co-creation. In a major initiative, the paper demonstrates linkages across the different types of co-creation, with a foundation/pivotal role for one particular type of co-creation, namely, enhanced client-based solutions.

Research limitations/implications

The research is restricted to the public sector and further research is needed to test applicability to the private sector. Future studies could continue the initiative in the current study to explore the linkages across co-creation types.

Practical implications

Implications depend on which type of co-creation is targeted. Enhancing client-based solutions co-creation requires a very strong role for engaged volunteers. Innovation co-creation requires both engaged volunteers and a propensity to co-create by enhancing client-based solutions. Brand advocacy co-creation is driven by volunteer commitment, altruism and a propensity to co-create innovation.

Social implications

A non-profit context ensures major social implications.

Originality/value

The study operationalizes the Saleem and Iglesias (2016) new internal branding paradigm framework by demonstrating that brands are built organically by interacting and engaging with internal stakeholders (volunteers in this instance), which, in turn, inter alia, motivates co-creation by such internal stakeholders.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Sanmitra Sarkar and Saikat Banerjee

The purpose of this paper is to empirically validate the role of different stakeholders in a co-creation context. In this paper, a new triadic brand co-creation concept…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to empirically validate the role of different stakeholders in a co-creation context. In this paper, a new triadic brand co-creation concept has been presented highlighting why consumers participate in brand co-creation, what is the role of the organizing company and what is the role of suppliers in such event and what are the benefits each of these three stakeholders receives in-turn of participating in such an event.

Design/methodology/approach

A quantitative approach has been adopted in this study using structural equation modeling to verify brand co-creation from the triadic stakeholder participation standpoint.

Findings

The empirical study validates that consumer’s perceived psychological benefits, brand self-connection and participation in brand communities all have a positive impact on the brand co-creation process. The results also suggest co-creating organizations should create an environment of trust and openness in such a brand co-creation event and they should show participatory leadership and provide proper tools and training to the participating consumers. The participating suppliers should show higher levels of professionalism, they should be willing to invest in research and development (R&D) and collaborate with organizations in their R&D effort. The results also validate that the brand co-creation event ensures increased brand knowledge and value of consumers. Also, brand co-creation is positively related to purchasing, helping others and consumers’ feedback intention. Through brand co-creation sponsoring organizations creates innovation and reduces resource issues and marketing costs. The results also show that brand co-creation can lead to better brand loyalty among consumers. Suppliers should also be actively engaged in brand co-creation as it leads to a better performance in terms of greater revenue, market offerings and reputation.

Research limitations/implications

The research investigates all aspects of inputs and benefits of the three different stakeholders – consumers, organizations and suppliers. It gives a comprehensive framework to validate the roles and benefits of each of the stakeholders from a consumer’s viewpoint. It conceptualizes and validates the constructs to provide the holistic concept and its associated framework.

Practical implications

The findings offer new insights to brand managers, Chief Experience Officers of how a brand co-creation event can be organized successfully, what should be the role of them, how they should involve suppliers in this kind of an event and finally how this kind of event can have a long-term impact on the brand in question.

Originality/value

This is the first empirical research on brand co-creation which investigates the roles and benefits from a triadic stakeholders’ standpoint. This study also analyzes and validates the comprehensive framework of brand co-creation proposed.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Antonios Giannopoulos, Lamprini Piha and George Skourtis

Drawing on the service-dominant logic and the institutional theory, this paper aims to explore the value-creating mechanisms of branding in the destination context and the…

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing on the service-dominant logic and the institutional theory, this paper aims to explore the value-creating mechanisms of branding in the destination context and the brand co-creation process at and between different levels of a service ecosystem.

Design/methodology/approach

An exploratory research design was used to generate qualitative data from 18 in-depth interviews with important stakeholders and investigate how and why brand co-creation is fostered in the service ecosystem.

Findings

The study proposes a stepwise process of strategic imperatives for brand co-creation in the destination context. It presents the multi-directional flows of the brand meaning across levels of the tourism ecosystem and thereby interprets stakeholders’ efforts to co-create sustainable brands that gain prominence in the global tourism arena.

Research limitations/implications

Future research might validate the framework in a quantitative research setting. The extended analysis of the value-creating ecosystem could investigate the role of institutions and brand value propositions across levels.

Practical implications

Acknowledging their limited control over the brand co-creation process, tourism practitioners are offered step-by-step guidance to help shape a destination brand that may retain relevance in the tourists’ minds. Critical insights are provided into resource sharing between actors and subsequent responsibilities for a sustainable destination branding strategy.

Originality/value

The paper considers the significance of the various levels in the ecosystem and the underlying mechanisms of brand co-creation in a somewhat neglected branding domain.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 30 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Nitha Palakshappa and Sarah Dodds

This research extends understanding of the role brand co-creation plays in encouraging ethical consumption. The paper addresses sustainable development goal 12 (SDG 12)…

Abstract

Purpose

This research extends understanding of the role brand co-creation plays in encouraging ethical consumption. The paper addresses sustainable development goal 12 (SDG 12): ensure sustainable consumption and production patterns, exploring how brand co-creation can be employed to advance this development goal.

Design/methodology/approach

The Customer Brand Co-creation Model is used within an embedded case design to understand the role of the brand and the consumer in promoting sustainable consumption within the fashion industry.

Findings

Initial insights suggest marketing has much to offer sustainability through the use of the brand. An extended brand co-creation framework highlights the importance of embedding sustainability and viewing the consumer as central to mobilising SDG12.

Practical implications

An important concern is to ensure sustainability is embedded within the activities and strategy of the organisation and viewed as integral rather than peripheral.

Originality/value

The paper examines aspects crucial to co-creation of “sustainability” through a focus on both the consumer and the brand. Case narratives provide a strong foundation to consider the Customer Brand Co-creation Model and implications of this framework for managerial practice. This study extends the model to encompass the umbrella of “sustainability” and the firm's perspective.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 39 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Anthony Samuel, Ken Peattie and Bob Doherty

This paper aims to further the authors’ understanding of brand communities, and their role in brand co-creation, through empirical and theoretical contributions derived…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to further the authors’ understanding of brand communities, and their role in brand co-creation, through empirical and theoretical contributions derived from researching the marketing dynamics operating within a successful but atypical form of brand community, Fairtrade Towns (FTT).

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reflects a pragmatic application of Grounded Theory, which captured qualitative data from key “insiders”, with a particular emphasis on FTT steering group members and their role as “prosumers”. Data were gathered via ethnographic involvement within one town and semi-structured interviews with participants in others.

Findings

FTTs, as brand communities, demonstrate elements of co-creation that go beyond the dominant theories and models within the marketing literature. They operate in, and relate to, real places rather than the online environments that dominate the literature on this subject. Unusually, the interactions between brand marketers and consumers are not the primary source of co-creation in FTTs. Instead, factors usually identified as merely secondary providers of additional brand knowledge become key initiators and sources of co-creation and active “citizen marketer” engagement.

Originality/value

This study demonstrates how brand co-creation can operate in physical geographical communities in ways that are formal without being managed by conventional brand managers. It conceptualises FTTs as a nested and “glocalised” brand and demonstrates how steering group members facilitate the process of co-creation as prosumers. It empirically demonstrates how FTTs have evolved to become unusually complex brand communities in terms of the variety of stakeholders and the multiplicity of brands involved, and the governance of the localised brand co-creation process.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 52 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Cassandra France, Debra Grace, Bill Merrilees and Dale Miller

The purpose of this paper is to expand on existing co-creation knowledge in order to accurately conceptualize, operationalize and contextualize the customer brand

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to expand on existing co-creation knowledge in order to accurately conceptualize, operationalize and contextualize the customer brand co-creation behavior concept from a customer perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

A quantitative approach is adopted in this study, using structural equation modeling to verify the co-creation of brand value for those customers who co-create.

Findings

A new four-dimensional co-creation behavior concept is supported, highlighting the role of development, feedback, advocacy and helping, in the co-creation of brand value. Furthermore, a range of customer-level and brand-level antecedents are empirically verified.

Research limitations/implications

The research takes a customer-centric view of co-creation and in doing so provides new insight into the effect on the co-creator. Additionally, the research offers an improved level of specificity in the co-creation domain by conceptualizing, operationalizing and contextualizing customer co-creation in a comprehensive research study.

Practical implications

The findings offer new insight to brand managers, identifying avenues for increasing customer participation in co-creation programs and critically highlighting that co-creation behavior has positive effects on the co-creator’s perception of brand value.

Originality/value

The customer-centric approach offers an original perspective from which to explore co-creation, demonstrating the positive potential of co-creation in brand management strategies.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 36 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Sanmitra Sarkar and Saikat Banerjee

The purpose of this paper is to find prior research work on brand co-creation and the role of different stakeholders in brand co-creation and to come up with a conceptual…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to find prior research work on brand co-creation and the role of different stakeholders in brand co-creation and to come up with a conceptual model that can be empirically validated.

Design/methodology/approach

A keyword approach has been used to find earlier published papers on co-creation and the role of different stakeholders in co-creation. The focus was more on brand co-creation. The inclusion criteria are empirical or conceptual research papers, books, conference papers, peer reviewed and published in English language journals. As the topic is encompassing various themes, a wide variety of academic resources were reviewed.

Findings

The history of literature brings forth the two major stakeholders consumers and organizations. The importance of third important stakeholder, i.e. suppliers has been mostly overlooked. However, previous studies show that appropriately managed supplier involvement can diminish product and brand development time and cost and it may provide access to newer technologies and better quality. Hence, for a successful brand co-creation one must not forget the importance of suppliers. Along with the motives and outcomes of brand co-creation from consumer and organization perspective this research aims to look into the supplier perspective of the brand co-creation framework.

Originality/value

This is the first academic literature review on brand co-creation from a triadic stakeholder perspective of consumers, organizations and suppliers. Also there is no comprehensive model that exists for brand co-creation looking at its input and its overall outcome. This review provides a bibliography of academic literature from 1959 to 2018 covering 150 journals.

Details

European Business Review, vol. 31 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-534X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Jing Zhang and Yong He

This paper aims to identify key dimensions of brand value co-creation activities and empirically examine the impacts of different dimensions of brand value co-creation

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to identify key dimensions of brand value co-creation activities and empirically examine the impacts of different dimensions of brand value co-creation upon brand performance among Chinese industrial services firms.

Design/methodology/approach

Key dimensions of brand value co-creation activities are identified and a research framework is presented based on qualitative interviews with three industrial services firms. Then, the conceptual model and 14 research hypotheses addressing the impacts of different dimensions of brand value co-creation activities upon brand performance are tested by conducting a questionnaire survey among 258 pairs of Chinese B2B services providers and their client companies.

Findings

The research results show that: on the whole, integration of brand value chain and service-dominant logic (SDL) can lead to stronger theoretical explanation about the industrial services brand value and brand performance. In other words, value co-creation activities among multiple stakeholders can help customers perceive brand value in a favorable way and finally improve brand performance; branding process involves eight kinds of value co-creation activities on four interfaces between firm-employees, firm-customers, employees-customers, and firm-other stakeholders, indicating that the cultivation of industrial services brand needs a broader stakeholder perspective; value co-creation activities on the firm-employees interface is original driver of brand development by impacting brand value and brand performance via value co-creation on other interfaces.

Originality/value

This paper is the first kind of research that empirically explores the formation mechanism of industrial brand value from the perspective of SDL and also provides insightful implications for managers by pointing out that B2B service providers need to consider the interactive value co-creation behaviors in the social network constructed by different stakeholders in order to improve brand management performance.

Details

Nankai Business Review International, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8749

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Eric Kennedy and Francisco Guzmán

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of Millennials’ perceived ability to influence a brand and how this perception about the brand impacts the consumers…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of Millennials’ perceived ability to influence a brand and how this perception about the brand impacts the consumers’ desire to engage in co-creation. Additionally, the paper examines the effects of perceived influence on attitude toward the ad and purchase intention.

Design/methodology/approach

Two studies were developed. In the first study, Millennial consumers identify technology brands they feel they are able to influence and not able to influence. Using the results from Study 1, Study 2, a 2 × 2 between subjects factorial design, is used to test the impact that perceived brand influence has on co-creation, attitude toward the ad and purchase intention.

Findings

The results of this paper offer new insight into consumer co-creation. Instead of co-creation being a constant that a brand can rely on, managers must now consider the attributions that consumers have about the brand. If a brand is perceived as being unable to be influenced, then not only will consumers not engage in co-creation but attitude toward that ad and purchase intention will also decrease.

Research limitations/implications

This paper focuses exclusively on Millennial consumers. While this segment of the population is large and important, validating the results with a national generalizable sample could shed additional insight into the power of the ability to influence on co-creation. The survey was created to mimic an online social media platform that a consumer interacts with on a regular basis. To further verify the test results, additional platforms for co-creation, including company websites and retail settings, could be tested.

Practical implications

If a brand wishes to engage Millennial consumers with active co-creation, then the perception of the brand is important for success. Brand managers must create a perception of the brand that is open to engagement with consumers – which allows for consumers to give input and help to shape the brand. Consumers should become comfortable with the idea of the brand asking for, accepting and implementing feedback from customers.

Originality/value

This paper is the first of its kind to combine attribution theory, theory of reasoned action and co-creation to measure the perceptions that consumers have about a brand. The results of this paper provide valuable insight to the limits and conditions in which co-creation will occur.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 26 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Eric Kennedy

This research aims to propose that prompted co-creation from a brand to a consumer will increase the value of the consumer to the brand through an increase in brand

Abstract

Purpose

This research aims to propose that prompted co-creation from a brand to a consumer will increase the value of the consumer to the brand through an increase in brand commitment and purchase intention. Additionally, the study compares the differences of a social media post made by a brand and a social media post made by a celebrity who is endorsing the brand.

Design/methodology/approach

Two studies were developed. First, a 2 × 2 between-subjects’ experimental design analyzes the effects of prompted and non-prompted co-creation posts by a fictitious brand and celebrity. Study 2 looks to confirm the results of Study 1 using a 2 × 2 between-subjects’ experimental design with a real brand and celebrity for the social media post. Co-creation, brand commitment and purchase intention are the dependent variables in both studies.

Findings

The studies reveal that a prompted co-creation post – which is a post explicitly asking for consumer feedback – from a brand can increase brand commitment and purchase intention from consumers. Also, the study reveals that, when compared to a celebrity-endorsed message, a branded message shows an increase in brand commitment and purchase intention. The results support the general notion of attribution theory.

Research limitations/implications

First, the study focused exclusively on millennial consumers. While this group has significant purchasing power, testing the effects of co-creation messages on a more generalizable sample is warranted. Next, the survey takes place in an online social media setting. With the power of social media and e-commerce, this channel is certainly important to study.

Practical implications

The results of this study bring the co-creation literature into a new area of research. Extending attachment theory and attribution theory into co-creation creates numerous opportunities to further grow the knowledge of the co-creation phenomena. The findings provide insight into the power that a prompted co-creation message can have on a consumer, either from a brand or celebrity endorser source. Practitioners can place a value on prompted and non-prompted co-creation messages originating with a brand. In addition, the research will give practitioners insight into how messages of co-creation are received by millennial consumers.

Originality/value

This research is the first of its kind for co-creation literature. No research to date examines the effect that a brand or celebrity-endorsed co-creation prompt has on the behavior of millennial consumers. Very little, if any, empirical research has been conducted on the co-creation of brand.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 4000