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1 – 10 of over 2000
Book part
Publication date: 30 November 2018

Allison Bruhn and Howard P. Wills

An extensive research base supports the positive effects of self-monitoring interventions on a number of student outcomes, both academic and behavioral. While the vast…

Abstract

An extensive research base supports the positive effects of self-monitoring interventions on a number of student outcomes, both academic and behavioral. While the vast majority of this research base relied on traditional paper-and-pencil forms of self-monitoring, advances in technology have created significant opportunities to develop technology-based self-monitoring (TBSM) systems that may offer a number of benefits in terms of efficiency and data management, storing, and graphing. Technology-based self-management applications have evolved and been studied extensively in health-related fields, but research and development for such applications is only beginning in the field of education. In this chapter we (1) provide a brief overview of the literature on traditional forms of self-monitoring, (2) examine how educators and educational researchers may apply lessons learned about TBSM from the medical field, (3) summarize emerging literature on TBSM for students with or at risk for emotional/behavioral disorders in particular, and (4) offer suggestions for future research and development in TBSM.

Details

Emerging Research and Issues in Behavioral Disabilities
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-085-7

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 29 August 2012

Andrew Bruce, John Wills Lloyd and Michael J. Kennedy

Self-monitoring has become one of the most widely employed self-control procedures in special education for students with learning disabilities and emotional or behavioral…

Abstract

Self-monitoring has become one of the most widely employed self-control procedures in special education for students with learning disabilities and emotional or behavioral disorders. Although its success has been documented across age groups, settings, and diverse applications, researchers have continued to study the question of whether focusing self-monitoring on certain target behaviors – particularly attention to task or academic performance – will yield superior outcomes for students. We review 11 available studies that have examined this issue, classifying each study according to the ways in which the researchers had students monitor their own behavior. The results show only small differences among the different methods and indicate a need for teachers to continue exercising professional judgment in planning the use of self-monitoring.

Details

Classroom Behavior, Contexts, and Interventions
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-972-1

Article
Publication date: 3 June 2021

Samina Quratulain, Aqsa Ejaz and Abdul Karim Khan

The purpose of this research is to examine frontline employees' self-monitoring personality as an antecedent of their emotional exhaustion and how supervisor-rated…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to examine frontline employees' self-monitoring personality as an antecedent of their emotional exhaustion and how supervisor-rated performance mediates this relationship. In addition, the authors explored the moderating role of perceived competitive climate on the indirect relationship between self-monitoring and emotional exhaustion.

Design/methodology/approach

Two hundred and thirty-seven frontline employees and their immediate supervisors working in hospitality organizations responded to the survey using time lagged research design. Measurement model was tested using confirmatory factor analysis to assess the distinctiveness of study constructs, and proposed moderated mediation model was tested using Process macro.

Findings

Results show that high self-monitoring leads to high supervisor-rated performance, and this relationship is stronger in highly competitive work climate. The supervisor-rated performance was negatively related to emotional exhaustion.

Originality/value

This study is the first to examine the interaction effects of self-monitoring and perceived competitive climate on frontline employees' performance and emotional exhaustion, particularly in the frontline jobs. Supervisor-rated performance has not been previously theorized or researched as an underlying mechanism of the effect of self-monitoring on emotional exhaustion.

Details

Journal of Service Theory and Practice, vol. 31 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-6225

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 February 2021

Xiaoyan Wang, Ping Li, Yi Zheng, Ling (Alice) Jiang and Zhilin Yang

Drawing on conservation of resources (COR) theory and the motivation-opportunity-ability (MOA) framework, this study examines how salespersons' self-monitoring and…

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing on conservation of resources (COR) theory and the motivation-opportunity-ability (MOA) framework, this study examines how salespersons' self-monitoring and psychological capital influence sales performance.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses survey data from 293 salespersons employed in China and their archival sales performance to test the hypotheses posited.

Findings

The results show that both salespersons' self-monitoring and psychological capital enhance sales performance via adaptive selling. However, these elements are primarily substitutes in influencing adaptive selling. In addition, by dividing social capital into two types (i.e. family-based social capital and customer-based social capital), the results reveal that salespersons' self-monitoring enhances family-based social capital, but not customer-based social capital. Finally, customer-based social capital, but not family-based capital, improves sales performance.

Research limitations/implications

This paper extends the literature on sales force management, which examines various psychological traits and their influences on sales performance. While self-monitoring and psychological capital have been investigated separately, this research simultaneously examines these two factors by drawing on resource conservation theory. Furthermore, it explores how these psychological traits impact salespersons' ability development (i.e. adaptive selling) and capital accumulation (i.e., family-based social capital and customer-based social capital), which, in turn, affect sales performance.

Practical implications

The results offer managerial insights into sales force selection and management. In particular, managers should encourage salespersons to obtain greater customer-based social capital, which is more valuable than family-based social capital in boosting sales performance.

Social implications

The present research is also beneficial for employee psychological health management, as it seeks to illuminate the role of psychological traits, ability development and capital accumulation. It offers insights into sociological research on social capital by categorizing it into family-based and customer-based capital.

Originality/value

This paper extends the literature on salespersons' psychological traits, selling abilities and social capital by examining the impacts of self-monitoring and psychological capital on adaptive selling and social capital. Specifically, this study examines the interplay between self-monitoring and psychological capital from the perspective of resources conservation theory.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 33 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

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Article
Publication date: 15 February 2011

Damon U. Bryant, Michelle Mitcham, Adalberto R. Araiza and Wing Man Leung

This study aims to investigate self‐monitoring as a moderator of the relationship between organizational position and perceptions of individual effort.

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Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate self‐monitoring as a moderator of the relationship between organizational position and perceptions of individual effort.

Design/methodology/approach.

A total of 133 students were randomly assigned to organizations of 12‐15 members. Each organization completed three projects in 14 weeks. Each student served in one position: management or non‐management. Participants also rated the effort of organizational members and then responded to items on the Self‐monitoring Scale.

Findings

Persons in management were rated as giving more effort than persons in non‐management. Self‐monitoring moderated the relationship between organizational position and perceptions of effort. Organizational members perceived high self‐monitors (HSMs) in management as giving more effort than HSMs in non‐management. In contrast, there was no difference in perceived effort of low self‐monitors (LSMs) across positions.

Research limitations/implications

By using students instead of actual employees working in project teams, the results may not generalize to all organizations. Because job performance is a multidimensional construct, findings may have limited application to very specific aspects of contextual performance.

Originality/value

These findings provide support for self‐monitoring as a moderator of organizational position and performance. This helps to reconcile debate about predicting behavior for cross‐situationally consistent LSMs and cross‐situationally variable HSMs. Implications for performance appraisals and differential prediction of criteria are discussed.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Sports Marketing and Sponsorship, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1464-6668

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Article
Publication date: 2 November 2015

Xiaohong Zhang, Chengfeng Long, Yanbo Wang and Gaowen Tang

This paper aims to study the impact of individual relationships on tacit knowledge sharing in the company setting of compulsory bond, expressive bond, instrumental bond…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to study the impact of individual relationships on tacit knowledge sharing in the company setting of compulsory bond, expressive bond, instrumental bond and self-monitoring by empirical explorations.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper raises seven hypotheses that focus on the impact of employees’ relationship with tacit knowledge sharing in knowledge-intensive industries and positions based on relationship theory. Before distributing the formal questionnaires, a pre-research was done in a college by collecting comments and suggestions so as to correct and modify the questionnaires. A four-page questionnaire based on the Likert scale with 45 questions was used for data collection, and 210 valid questionnaires were collected from a research institute, a software company and an educational institute. Finally, SPSS17.0 was used to analyze these data, including reliability analysis, validity analysis, correlation analysis and regression analysis, etc.

Findings

The findings include: there is a positive correlation between employees’ compulsory bond and the efficiency of tacit knowledge sharing; there is a positive correlation between employees’ expressive bond and the efficiency of tacit knowledge sharing; there is a negative correlation between employees’ instrumental bond and the efficiency of tacit knowledge sharing; the more apt employees are at self-monitoring, the more effectively they will share tacit knowledge; the interaction between compulsory bonds and self-monitoring has a positive and stimulating impact on tacit knowledge sharing; the interaction between expressive bonds and self-monitoring has a positive and stimulating impact on tacit knowledge sharing; and the interaction between instrumental bonds and self-monitoring has a certain impact on tacit knowledge sharing.

Research limitations/implications

However, the efficiency of tacit knowledge sharing cannot be measured easily and how to share the tacit knowledge based on employees’ relationships should be further concerned by knowledge industries.

Practical implications

This paper illustrates multiple, in-depth approaches to research on knowledge sharing. It shows why it is important to pay attention to employees’ relationships during the process of tacit knowledge sharing. The author argued some key factors such as compulsory bond, emotional bond and self-monitoring that may have a certain impact on the tacit knowledge sharing. The paper also further discussed the influence on the sharing of tacit knowledge as for the interaction between different relationship types and self-monitoring.

Social implications

The knowledge is critical to enhance enterprises’ performance, and it will become more useful when the new knowledge is shared with others. However, tacit knowledge cannot be measured easily, and how to share the tacit knowledge based on employees’ relationships should be further concerned by knowledge industries. A series of findings are proposed in this paper.

Originality/value

Integrating the knowledge of different individuals, of which 90 per cent is tacit knowledge, in an organization that engages in producing products and providing service is instrumental to the sustainability and productivity of that organization. This study addressed the factors and dynamics of tacit knowledge sharing that can be used in knowledge management to effectively capture, store and disseminate tacit knowledge across an organization.

Details

Chinese Management Studies, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-614X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 31 May 2011

Hsin‐Hui “Sunny” Hu and H.G. Parsa

The purpose of this research is to understand the effects of self‐monitoring, dining companions and industry segments on the usage of alternate currencies while dining out.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to understand the effects of self‐monitoring, dining companions and industry segments on the usage of alternate currencies while dining out.

Design/methodology/approach

An experimental design using frequent consumers of restaurant services is being used with a scenario approach with a sample size of 471.

Findings

Results indicate that self‐monitoring has significant impact on consumers' choice for alternate currencies. In addition, the type of dining companion (boss vs friend vs alone) has significant affect on usage of alternate currencies. Industry segments were not found be a significant factor in making usage of alternate currencies. For high self‐monitoring individuals, the preferences for currency usages are more likely influenced by the image delivered by the currency than for low self‐monitors. Consumers who dine with a friend or alone are more likely to prefer to pay with frequent usage points‐only (as opposed to dollars‐only) than consumers who dine with the boss. This result indicates that the dining companion is an important determinant in preferring the alternative currency, frequent usage points. Since frequent usage points are a signal of price discount, consumers do not want to make an impression of “being cheap” on the higher‐status dining companion (e.g. boss) by using frequent usage points for their dining experiences. On the other hand, if consumers dine with a friend or alone, they are more likely to reap the financial rewards of paying with frequent usage points without regard to the impression it creates.

Research limitations/implications

These findings have significant implications for the restaurants marketers and managers. Implementation of frequent diners program may be affected significantly by self‐monitoring characteristics and nature of dining companions.

Originality/value

This study extends the understanding of individual differences associated with currency preference by examining the effects of self‐monitoring and impression management on consumer preferences for currency usage. Identifying the characteristics of consumers using the different currency options is critical for the foodservice industry.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1997

Beverly A. Browne and Dennis O. Kaldenberg

The relationship of self‐monitoring to buying behavior and to the consumer’s value system is controversial and not well understood. The study examined the relationship…

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Abstract

The relationship of self‐monitoring to buying behavior and to the consumer’s value system is controversial and not well understood. The study examined the relationship between self‐monitoring, materialism, and involvement with clothing and brands among a sample of 387 young adults. Constructs were measured with Snyder’s Self‐Monitoring Scale, the Material Values Scale, the Consumer Involvement Profile, and a scale measuring market alienation. Self‐monitoring was positively related to materialism, to clothing involvement, and to interest in marketplace events and brands. Discusses implications for the meaning of self‐monitoring and the use of personality in explaining consumption behavior. Suggests implications for marketing strategy.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 April 2020

Hanna Lee and Sun-Jin Hwang

The purpose of this paper is to explore and examine the different word-of-mouth (WOM) acceptance and diffusion in social brand communities according to the level of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore and examine the different word-of-mouth (WOM) acceptance and diffusion in social brand communities according to the level of self-monitoring.

Design/methodology/approach

A web-based experimental design was used. The design consisted of three-mixed design of 2 (type of social networking sites) × 2 (type of online brand communities) × 2 (self-monitoring). ANOVA analysis was conducted.

Findings

Findings indicate that the differences in acceptance and diffusion of WOM according to online brand community type, and there was a significant three-way interaction effect. Specifically, people who have high propensity to self-monitor showed greater WOM acceptance in a consumer-driven community in either type of social networking sites while people who have low propensity to self-monitor showed greater WOM diffusion in a consumer-driven community only in interest-based social networking sites.

Practical implications

An important implication is that the social networking sites where brand communities can be placed should be chosen with the full consideration of different desires consumers have in terms of their level of self-monitoring to increase WOM effects.

Originality/value

This paper proposes the self-monitoring tendency as the key factor that predicts WOM effects with revealing the optimal combination of types of social networking sites and online brand communities that is most preferable for consumers with different self-monitoring level.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 2000