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Abstract

Details

Critical Capabilities and Competencies for Knowledge Organizations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-767-7

Article
Publication date: 28 September 2022

Navneet Kaur and Lakhwinder Singh Kang

Drawing from the gender schema theory and social role theory, the purpose of this study is to assess the gender-congruent nature of organizational citizenship behaviors…

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing from the gender schema theory and social role theory, the purpose of this study is to assess the gender-congruent nature of organizational citizenship behaviors (OCBs) through the mediating role of gender role orientation (femininity and masculinity) in the relationship between individuals sex and OCB dimensions. It also explores the moderating effect of gender ideology on the influence of sex on the exhibition of gender-congruent OCBs.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected in two waves with a time lag of three weeks from frontline employees and their peers working in the Indian private banking sector. PROCESS macro was used to assess the hypothesized relationships.

Findings

The results indicated that femininity mediated the influence of sex on OCBs directed toward co-workers (OCBI). However, the mediating role of femininity was not confirmed in the association between sex and OCBs targeted toward customers (OCBC). Further, masculinity mediated the influence of sex on OCBs directed toward the organization (OCBO). Gender ideology also moderated the relationship between sex and OCBs, such that traditional women displayed more OCBI as compared to egalitarian women, while egalitarian women displayed more OCBC than traditional women. Additionally, traditional men were found to display more OCBO than egalitarian men.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to the existing literature by suggesting that the performance of OCBs depends upon various gender identities, with each gender identity having its own and significant effect on the performance of OCB.

Details

Evidence-based HRM: a Global Forum for Empirical Scholarship, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-3983

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 21 September 2022

Thenuja Sivabalachandran and Tharusha Gooneratne

Drawing insights from finance and non-finance managers in Sri Lanka, this study unveils complexities and conflicts surrounding the roles of management accountants and the…

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing insights from finance and non-finance managers in Sri Lanka, this study unveils complexities and conflicts surrounding the roles of management accountants and the nature of role construction stemming from differing expectations of non-finance managers and external influences.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper adopts the qualitative methodology and leans on role theory and new institutional sociology (NIS), as these dual theories complement each other and enable a holistic understanding of management accountants' roles, complexities and conflicts.

Findings

The findings reveal that in fulfilling their roles on par with divisional goals, amid expectations of non-finance managers and external influences, management accountants face various complexities and conflicts. Furthermore, in navigating through their roles, understanding the operational realities of work organizations and business sectors and negotiating with non-finance managers is vital.

Research limitations/implications

This research draws evidence from a selection of finance and non-finance managers. Thus the findings are not expected to be generalized to business firms in Sri Lanka.

Practical implications

This paper offers practitioner insights into how management accountants could construct their roles in different organizational settings, balancing the expectations of non-finance managers and external influences.

Originality/value

Despite its importance, complexities and conflicts surrounding management accountants' roles amid multiple influences have attracted scant research attention. Hence this paper is a noteworthy addition to the literature. Besides, using role theory and NIS in tandem although apt, has not been the focus of prior researchers in delving into this phenomenon.

Details

Asian Journal of Accounting Research, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2443-4175

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 September 2022

Dinushika Samanthi and Tharusha Gooneratne

This paper aims to explore the changing role of the accountant amid multiple drivers, responses of accountants and situated rationality in a multinational firm, Max-choice Lanka.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the changing role of the accountant amid multiple drivers, responses of accountants and situated rationality in a multinational firm, Max-choice Lanka.

Design/methodology/approach

It adopts the single-site case study approach under the qualitative methodology and leans on institutional theory, specifically Ter Bogt and Scapens (2019) framework.

Findings

The case study findings reveal that the role of the accountant has undergone change amid local and broader institutions linked to organizational culture/norms, the influence of the parent company, global trends and technological advancements. Based on evolving situated rationalities, the contemporary accountant performs an agile role as a value-adding business partner; data scientist; strategic decision-maker; and a cross-functional team member.

Practical implications

At the practice level, identifying drivers influencing the changing role of accountants enables organizations to shape their accounting functions attuned to evolving needs by implementing appropriate strategies and recruiting competent personnel. In the realm of education, it calls for incorporating areas such as big data analytics, artificial intelligence, reporting nonfinancial information and integrated accounting software to the accounting curricular and upskill students based on industry expectations catering to changing roles.

Originality/value

This paper adds to the ongoing debate on the contemporary role of the accountant. Capitalizing on case study data, this research illuminates the influence of multiplicity of institutions, different forms and situated rationality within this changing role and extends the Ter Bogt and Scapens (2019) framework.

Details

Journal of Accounting & Organizational Change, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1832-5912

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 August 2022

Andrea Pemberton and Jennifer Kisamore

Burnout has been linked to a myriad of negative organizational and individual health outcomes which threaten employee and organizational well-being. This study examines…

Abstract

Purpose

Burnout has been linked to a myriad of negative organizational and individual health outcomes which threaten employee and organizational well-being. This study examines how unique features of diversity and inclusion (D&I) work are related to burnout.

Design/methodology/approach

Participants were recruited using network and convenience sampling strategies. A total of 64 full-time employees whose primary responsibility is to implement the D&I strategy for their organization provided useable data for analysis. Participants completed measures of burnout, role ambiguity, role conflict, subjective experiences of tokenism, and top management support. Measures were administered online via Qualtrics.

Findings

Results suggest lack of clear job duties, conflicting job demands, lack of top management support, and experiences of tokenism are associated with D&I professionals' experiences of burnout. The current study, however, indicates that while D&I professional experience higher levels of exhaustion than other professionals, they also experience greater professional efficacy, which suggests D&I roles are both challenging and rewarding.

Practical implications

Results suggest organizational leaders may mitigate employee burnout by providing clear support to and role definitions for D&I professionals.

Originality/value

This study is the first to explore burnout experiences among D&I professionals. Additionally, this study examines how burnout experiences are associated with role dysfunctions, top management support, and subjective experiences of tokenism.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 31 August 2022

Hannes Lindkvist, Frida Lind and Lisa Melander

This paper aims to investigate actor roles and public–private interactions in networks. Role dynamics are explored in two settings: the current development network and the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate actor roles and public–private interactions in networks. Role dynamics are explored in two settings: the current development network and the future implementation network to which actors are transitioning.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper builds on the industrial marketing and purchasing approach to business markets and uses a qualitative methodology. A case study of a network developing geofencing applications in the context of sustainable transport was used. The main source of data was interviews with 26 respondents from public and private organizations.

Findings

Roles in development and implementation of geofencing are identified, where private and public actors may take on one or several roles in the developing setting. When transitioning to the implementation setting, the expectations of public actors vary and there is ambiguity over their roles, which range from active to inactive. This detailed empirical case study shows the complexity of multi-actor involvement when developing digital technology for the transport system.

Research limitations/implications

The study highlights the transition from firm-centric innovation to network-centric innovation and its implications on actor roles.

Practical implications

Organizations participating in public–private innovation networks need to be aware of the multiple roles public organizations play and the complexities they face.

Originality/value

The paper explores role dynamics within and between the development and implementation settings of geofencing. Within the current development setting, roles are identified at different organizational levels with limited change in role dynamics. When transitioning to a new setting, actors’ role dynamics may range from “limited” to “path-breaking.” In future settings, actors enter and exit networks and their roles may change dramatically.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2022

Mengying Wu, Rongsong Wang, Christophe Estay and Wei Shen

The purpose of this study is to explore the U-shaped relationship between ambidextrous leadership and employee silence by examining power distance orientation as a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to explore the U-shaped relationship between ambidextrous leadership and employee silence by examining power distance orientation as a boundary condition and role stress and relational energy as mediators.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors tested the theoretical model with 212 matched samples collected across three-wave-data from 21 companies and branches in China.

Findings

Results revealed that ambidextrous leadership showed a U-shaped relationship with employee silence through role stress and relational energy. Moreover, the authors found that the curvilinear relationship was more significant for employees higher in power distance orientation.

Practical implications

Organizations should be aware of the negative side of ambidextrous leadership as well as its stimulation on employee silence. The leaders should pay more attention to subordinates and judge whether they are under too much stress, as well as treat employees more cautiously in both work and non-work situations.

Originality/value

This study provides a first step to the understanding of curvilinear influence of ambidextrous leadership through investigating the mediating effects of role stress and relational energy, and integrating the moderating role of power distance orientation in the process.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 August 2022

Yiwen Zhang, Yongqiang Sun, Wuping Lei and Nan Wang

The primary objective of this research is to explore the underlying mechanisms of social ties influencing lurking behaviour in Microblog by combing role theory and social…

Abstract

Purpose

The primary objective of this research is to explore the underlying mechanisms of social ties influencing lurking behaviour in Microblog by combing role theory and social identity theory.

Design/methodology/approach

An online survey of 312 Microblog users in China was conducted to test the proposed research model and hypotheses. The partial least squares (PLS) approach was used to analyse the data.

Findings

The results show that social ties affect lurking behaviour on Microblog in two ways, directly and indirectly through role stress. Social ties have a negative direct impact on lurking behaviour. Based on the multiple mediation analysis, social ties positively affect lurking through role overload and negatively affect lurking via role ambiguity. Perceived heterogeneity strengthens the positive effects of social ties on role overload and conflict, and weakens the negative impact of social ties on role ambiguity. Social identification weakens the positive relationship between social ties and role overload and strengthens the negative relationship between social ties and role ambiguity.

Originality/value

This study extends the literature on the social interaction reasons behind lurking behaviour in Microblog by revealing the effects of social ties in Microblog. The theoretical mechanisms of social ties on lurking behaviour in Microblog are unveiled by discovering the direct effect of social ties, the mediating effects of multidimensional role stress, and the moderating effects of different kinds of social identity.

Details

Aslib Journal of Information Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-3806

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 August 2022

Victoria Millar, Linda Hobbs, Christopher Speldewinde and Jan van Driel

Girls are underrepresented in many school science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) subjects, leading to ongoing gender disparity in STEM careers. This issue…

Abstract

Purpose

Girls are underrepresented in many school science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) subjects, leading to ongoing gender disparity in STEM careers. This issue is not new and has seen a range of initiatives implemented in an attempt to increase girls’ STEM participation. In Australia, a number of these initiatives have emphasised role models and mentors. This paper seeks to understand the influence of role models and mentors on girls’ STEM identities.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper presents qualitative research undertaken with STEM experts into the influences on girls’ STEM identities. Data were collected through three phases involving semi-structured interviews, a forum and focus groups. Thematic analysis identified the importance of mentoring and role modelling in shaping girls’ STEM participation and identities.

Findings

This paper provides a basis for rethinking how and when role models and mentors can assist girls in making decisions about STEM. In particular, it reveals the need for role models and mentors to consider the role of relatability in developing girls’ STEM identities and the need to do this at multiple points throughout girls’ lives.

Originality/value

This article captures the perspectives of multiple experts involved in a variety of STEM professions on the topic of how mentors and role models can influence girls to consider STEM professions. Utilising the concept of identity, this paper sheds new light on girls’ interactions with role models and mentors and the value of storying in role modelling and mentoring relationships as an important component of girls’ identity work in relation to STEM.

Details

International Journal of Mentoring and Coaching in Education, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6854

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 25 August 2022

Caroline Murphy and Aoife O'Meara

Drawing on Bourdieu's conceptualisation of physical capital, this article explores the experiences of male and female employees in non-traditional occupations where body…

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing on Bourdieu's conceptualisation of physical capital, this article explores the experiences of male and female employees in non-traditional occupations where body work is an integral part of the role. Specifically, the authors examine how being an underrepresented gender in this context impacts the experience of work, including challenges faced and perceptions for future opportunities in the role.

Design/methodology/approach

The research is based on two in-depth case studies undertaken in the social care and security/door work sector. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with male social care workers and female security workers in the night-time hospitality sector. Management representatives were also interviewed in each case. The interviews examined how the nature of the work in these roles impacted on the underrepresented gender's perceptions of various aspects of their working lives.

Findings

The findings illustrate how many of the challenges associated with non-traditional occupations are experienced differently in body work roles, either being amplified or instead presenting opportunities for the role holder with implications for the day-to-day and longer-term experience of work. The findings illustrate how the actions and behaviour of management and colleagues can exacerbate the extent to which underrepresented gender feel accepted within their role and organisation.

Practical implications

Organisational decision makers need to be aware of the importance of reviewing practices regarding hiring, promotion and the allocation of tasks and duties for non-traditional role holders engaged in body work.

Originality/value

The article contributes to understandings of “body work” and physical capital in non-traditional occupations, illustrating how gender-based assumptions can restrict individuals in these roles to a greater extent than in other forms of work where the body is salient to the performance of the role.

Details

Employee Relations: The International Journal, vol. 44 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

Keywords

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