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Article
Publication date: 2 August 2011

Jabir Ali and Kriti Bardhan Gupta

In line with the ongoing global and domestic reforms in agriculture and allied sectors, the Indian Government is reducing its direct market intervention and encouraging…

Abstract

Purpose

In line with the ongoing global and domestic reforms in agriculture and allied sectors, the Indian Government is reducing its direct market intervention and encouraging private participation based on market forces. This has led to increased exposure of agricultural produce to price and other market risks, which consequently emphasize the importance of futures markets for price discovery and price risk management. The purpose of this paper is to analyze the efficiency of agricultural commodity markets by assessing the relationships between futures prices and spot market prices of major agricultural commodities in India.

Design/methodology/approach

The efficiency of the futures market for 12 agricultural commodities, traded at one of the largest commodity exchanges of India, i.e. National Commodity & Derivatives Exchange Ltd, has been explored by using Johansen's cointegration analysis and Granger causality tests. Unit root test procedures such as Augmented Dickey‐Fuller and non‐parametric Phillips‐Perron were initially applied to examine whether futures and spot prices are stationary or not. The hypothesis, that futures prices are unbiased predictors of spot prices has been tested using econometric software package.

Findings

Results show that cointegration exists significantly in futures and spot prices for all the selected agricultural commodities except for wheat and rice. This suggest that there is a long‐term relationship between futures and spot prices for most of the agricultural commodities like maize, chickpea, black lentil, pepper, castor seed, soybean and sugar. The causality test further distinguishes and categorizes the commodities based on direction of relationship between futures and spot prices. The analysis of short‐term relationship by causality test indicates that futures markets have stronger ability to predict subsequent spot prices for chickpea, castor seed, soybean and sugar as compared to maize, black lentil and pepper, where bi‐directional relationships exist in the short run.

Practical implications

The results of this study are useful for various stakeholders active in agricultural commodities markets such as producers, traders, commission agents, commodity exchange participants, regulators and policy makers.

Originality/value

There are very few studies that have explored the efficiency of the commodity futures market in India in a detailed manner, especially at individual commodity level.

Details

Agricultural Finance Review, vol. 71 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-1466

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1984

Irene Finch

Being low in fat and cholesterol free, yet contaiing valuable amounts of protein and dietary fibre, the pulses are an important group of foods which rate well by today's…

Abstract

Being low in fat and cholesterol free, yet contaiing valuable amounts of protein and dietary fibre, the pulses are an important group of foods which rate well by today's dietary standards. But how many people appreciate their value, know about the different kinds of pulses available and some of the most appetising ways of serving them? Irene Finch MA, BEd tells us more about these versatile foods

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 84 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1991

Georgina Holt

Vegetarianism is currently receiving more attention from the foodindustry than ever before. The campaign initiated by the NACNE and COMAReports has created a new “health…

Abstract

Vegetarianism is currently receiving more attention from the food industry than ever before. The campaign initiated by the NACNE and COMA Reports has created a new “health appeal”, resulting in an increased demand for vegetarian food, which is consumer‐driven. Product development in the vegetarian sector should, therefore, favour the use of vegetables and pulses rather than dairy products. Beans, nuts, seeds and grains are all the more appetising now because of the abundance of vegetables available to combine with them. Manufacturers should take the opportunity of an expanding market to provide imaginative, sumptuous products which truly do justice to the variety of colours, flavours and textures of pulses.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 93 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 2 March 2015

Anoma Ariyawardana, Ramu Govindasamy and Allan Lisle

Red lentils are one of the widely consumed food items in South Asia and this has created an enormous market opportunity for all players in the chain. Therefore, the…

Abstract

Purpose

Red lentils are one of the widely consumed food items in South Asia and this has created an enormous market opportunity for all players in the chain. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to examine the most valued attributes of red lentils and to assess how consumer preferences vary across store type and by socio-demographic factors. Thereby, it was aimed to identify value chain interventions that are required to meet the consumer demand.

Design/methodology/approach

Sri Lanka was selected as the study location because of its significance as an importer. Through an intercept survey of 300 consumers in three store types, consumption pattern and preference for four attributes of red lentils, namely, size, colour, visual quality and price were collected. Data were also collected from retail and wholesale stores and from a processor. Conjoint analysis was used to analyse the consumer data.

Findings

A majority of the respondents consumed red lentils on a daily basis. Consumer preference rankings showed that consumers place a significantly greater level of importance on visual quality than other attributes. Trade-off patterns were different across store types and by socio-demographic factors. Grocery shoppers were willing to trade-off packaging to price while the reverse was true for supermarket shoppers. Retail and wholesale purchases were driven by quality.

Research limitations/implications

Findings highlight that chain effectiveness could be enhanced by offering bigger sized lentils while assuring quality.

Originality/value

This research uses a consumer driven assessment in identifying required value chain interventions.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 117 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1983

Much to the relief of everyone, the general election has come and gone and with it the boring television drivel; the result a foregone conclusion. The Labour/Trade Union…

Abstract

Much to the relief of everyone, the general election has come and gone and with it the boring television drivel; the result a foregone conclusion. The Labour/Trade Union movement with a severe beating, the worst for half a century, a disaster they have certainly been asking for. Taking a line from the backwoods wisdom of Abraham Lincoln — “You can't fool all the people all the time!” Now, all that most people desire is not to live easy — life is never that and by the nature of things, it cannot be — but to have a reasonably settled, peaceful existence, to work out what they would consider to be their destiny; to be spared the attentions of the planners, the plotters, provocateurs, down to the wilful spoilers and wreckers. They have a right to expect Government protection. We cannot help recalling the memory of a brilliant Saturday, but one of the darkest days of the War, when the earth beneath our feet trembled at the destructive might of fleets of massive bombers overhead, the small silvery Messerschmits weaving above them. Believing all to be lost, we heaped curses on successive Governments which had wrangled over rearmament, especially the “Butter before Guns” brigade, who at the word conscription almost had apoplexy, and left its people exposed to destruction. Now, as then, the question is “Have they learned anything?” With all the countless millions Government costs, its people have the right to claim something for their money, not the least of which is the right to industrial and domestic peace.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 85 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 31 October 2008

Nuzhat Huma, Muhammad Anjum, Samreen Sehar, Muhammad Issa Khan and Shahzad Hussain

Legumes are widely grown and are consumed as a source of plant protein throughout the world. They rank second after cereals with respect to their consumption order…

Abstract

Purpose

Legumes are widely grown and are consumed as a source of plant protein throughout the world. They rank second after cereals with respect to their consumption order. Legumes have anti‐nutritional factors which make their uses limited. This study aims to check the effect of soaking and cooking on the anti‐nutrient contents and nutritional quality of the legumes.

Design/methodology/approach

Five legumes (white kidney bean, red kidney bean, lentil, chickpea, and white gram) frequently used by the masses were selected for soaking and cooking trials. Legumes were tested for their weight, volume, density, swelling capacity and water absorption capacity before soaking and cooking. Legumes were soaked in simple water, 2 per cent sodium chloride solution, acetic acid and sodium bicarbonate and cooked in a beaker with 1 : 5 seed water ratio to uniform soft mass. After soaking and cooking, legumes were tested for anti‐nutrients (phytic acid and tannin) and their nutritional quality.

Findings

The statistical analysis of the study results revealed that dark colour legume (red kidney bens) has a high level of phytic acid and tannin compared with light colour (white kidney beans and white grams). Soaking and cooking of legumes result in significant reduction in phytic acid and tannin contents. Maximum reduction of phytic acid (78.055) and tannin (65.81 per cent) was found for sodium bicarbonate soaking followed by cooking. These treatments also result in a slight reduction in nutrients such as protein, minerals and total sugars.

Practical implications

Soaking and cooking of legumes reduce their anti‐nutrients; phytic acid and tannin significantly. These treatments may be used domestically as well as commercially to increase the nutrients' availability from legumes to meet the problem of protein and minerals deficiencies.

Originality/value

Along with water different soaking solutions which are easily available in the market were used to test out their effect on the nutritional quality and safety. These may be used by the common people to raise their nutritional status.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 38 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2002

Jane Gentle

Abstract

Details

Working with Older People, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-3666

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2006

Manu and N. Khetarpaul

The aim of the present nutritional survey was to assess the food consumption pattern of 183 Indian preschool children (four to five years) in Fatehabad district of Haryana.

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of the present nutritional survey was to assess the food consumption pattern of 183 Indian preschool children (four to five years) in Fatehabad district of Haryana.

Design/methodology/approach

Data regarding food frequency, myths and intake were collected with the help of questionnaires and structured interviews. Food consumption patterns were recorded using a 24‐hour recall for three consecutive days.

Findings

The food frequency pattern indicated that wheat was the most accepted cereal among almost all the families and the consumption of pulses was weekly or on alternate days. They consumed roots and tubers frequently but the consumption of green leafy vegetables, fruits and other vegetables depended on the availability only. Most of the families consumed buffalo's milk (93 per cent) and desi ghee (73 per cent) daily. More than half of the respondents' mothers believed bajra, maize (corn), some pulses, bathua (Chenopodium album) and fenugreek leaves, onion, garlic, ginger, desi ghee and sweets are hot foods. According to the 24‐hour recall method for three consecutive days, the daily mean intake of all foodstuffs, namely, cereals, pulses, green leafy vegetables, roots and tubers, other vegetables, fruits, fats and oils, milk and milk products and sugar and jaggery was lower than their respective recommended dietary intake in the daily diets of preschool children.

Originality/value

On the basis of findings of this study, nutrition policy makers can plan the strategies for improving the nutritional status of preschool children who are an important segment of the Indian population.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 108 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2002

Zerrin Kenanoğlu and Özlem Karahan

The legal and institutional infrastructure of organic agriculture in Turkey and the progress of the production and the marketing of organic agricultural products are…

Abstract

The legal and institutional infrastructure of organic agriculture in Turkey and the progress of the production and the marketing of organic agricultural products are analyzed. An overview of the field research carried out in Turkey, on both the production and consumption of organic products, is presented. The policies currently implemented for the improvement of the sector have been evaluated. Some strategic policy suggestions have been put forward.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 104 no. 3/4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 11 March 2014

Rajesh Sada, Anushiya Shrestha, Ashutosh Kumar Shukla and Lieke Anna Melsen

This paper aims to explore the local knowledge on climate change, its impacts and the responses they are making at the household or community level to deal with the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the local knowledge on climate change, its impacts and the responses they are making at the household or community level to deal with the changes on the basis of their experiences and perceptions.

Design/methodology/approach

The study was based on household survey conducted with one male and one female respondent in 202 households. Alongside, series of focused group discussions were conducted with local people to capture the perception on about climate change, its impacts and adaptation strategies applied to enhance their resilience capacity to changing climate. Rainfall and temperature data were collected from Department of Hydrology and Meteorology (DHM) for seven and four different stations, respectively, within Kathmandu Valley and analyzed to understand the climatic trend.

Findings

The perception of most of the local people on changes in temperature was almost in line with the recorded long-term climatic trend both showing an increasing trend, whereas the perception of decreasing both monsoon and non-monsoon rainfall did not match with the recorded data as the rainfall data analysis did not reflect any clear long-term pattern. People have been facing several impacts such as decrease in water sources, decrease in agricultural crop production, increase in new crop pest and weeds in agricultural crops. Local people are responding to these impacts as per their own skills and traditional knowledge.

Originality/value

This is totally original research article and the impacts and adaptations measures documented in this article may represent the case of peri-urban areas of least developed countries like Nepal.

Details

International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-8692

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