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Article
Publication date: 9 July 2019

Youn-Kyung Kim, Sejin Ha and Soo-Hee Park

The purpose of this paper is to identify men’s clothing market segments based on store types and generational cohorts and the retail attributes.

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1312

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify men’s clothing market segments based on store types and generational cohorts and the retail attributes.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 2,808 US male consumer data from Predictive Analytics survey were analyzed with correspondence analysis (CA) (to identify segments based on store types and generations), general linear model (GLM) (to determine what retail attributes were important to target each segment) and a Rasch tree model (to test items of each factor in their relative importance).

Findings

The CA produced three segments: Segment 1 (Gen Y male consumers who frequently shop at specialty stores), Segment 2 (Gen X males who frequently shop at discount stores and online stores) and Segment 3 (Baby Boomers and Seniors who frequently shop at department stores). GLM shows that fundamentals were important to all segments; experiential was most important to Segment 1, while promotion was most important to Segment 3. Rasch tree analysis provided specific information on retail attributes for each store type and each generation.

Research limitations/implications

Future research could employ both the importance and performance of retail attributes that are measured on a rating scale to understand consumers’ attitudes toward each retail format.

Practical implications

This study provided men’s clothing retailers with current insights into the male consumer segments based upon generational cohorts and store types from which they can better develop appropriate positioning strategies to satisfy the needs of each segment.

Originality/value

This study addressed the men’s clothing market, a growing but largely ignored market in the clothing industry and the retail literature.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 47 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 21 June 2011

Tapas Sarkar and Asit Kr. Batabyal

The paper aims to develop an evaluation model of the customer satisfaction index (CSI) in an R&D organization. A conceptual framework on customer satisfaction with a…

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1049

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to develop an evaluation model of the customer satisfaction index (CSI) in an R&D organization. A conceptual framework on customer satisfaction with a probabilistic approach has been attempted based on customer requirements and expectations in compliance with the clauses of ISO 9001:2008.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey through a well‐designed customer feedback data sheet has been used as an effective tool for the measurement of CSI. The questionnaire was framed on the basis of the requirements of a quality management system with advice to the customer for allotting grade points on a given scale to the quality parameters. The research model has been analyzed based on a fault‐tree approach and the probability of failure of each quality parameter has been assigned on the basis of grade point average. Data analysis for the estimation of the probability of failure at a customer satisfaction level (CSL) was carried out based on the probability of failure of each quality element graded by the customers. The data were also tested through statistical inference of whether customer‐to‐customer satisfaction level differs or not.

Findings

As a result of case study analysis, 88 percent of customers are fully satisfied. This gives significant information to the management process as well as providing a guiding tool for future improvements. The analysis was carried out based on a framed questionnaire graded by the customer and the result reveals that there is no significant difference between customer satisfaction levels.

Research limitations/implications

This model can be used by any organization, irrespective of the number of customers participating, as well as the number of quality parameters being assigned in the customer feedback analysis.

Originality/value

A literature review found that there are various approaches for evaluating a CSI. The paper describes how a newly‐applied conceptual model based on the failure of CSL in the form of a fault‐tree approach was designed and how the probability of failure of each element/parameters was assigned on the basis of a grade point average to evaluate the CSI, as well as the variation in satisfaction levels between customers being analyzed.

Details

Asian Journal on Quality, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1598-2688

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 4 August 2017

Abstract

Details

Team Dynamics Over Time
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-403-7

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Book part
Publication date: 30 November 2018

Abstract

Details

The Future of Innovation and Technology in Education: Policies and Practices for Teaching and Learning Excellence
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-555-5

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Book part
Publication date: 4 August 2017

Colin Dingler, Alina A. von Davier and Jiangang Hao

Increased interest in team dynamics has resulted in new methods for measuring teamwork over time. The primary purpose of this chapter is to provide a survey of recent…

Abstract

Purpose

Increased interest in team dynamics has resulted in new methods for measuring teamwork over time. The primary purpose of this chapter is to provide a survey of recent developments in teamwork/collaboration measurement in an educational context. Key topics include conceptual frameworks, large-scale assessments, and innovative measurement techniques.

Methodology/approach

A range of methods for collecting and analyzing teamwork data are discussed, and five frameworks for measuring collaborative problem solving (CPS) over time are compared. Frameworks from Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA), Assessment and Teaching of 21st Century Skills (ATC21S) project, Educational Testing Service (ETS), ACT, and von Davier and Halpin (2013) are discussed. Results of assessments developed from these frameworks are also considered.

Social/practical implications

New techniques for measuring team dynamics over time have great potential to improve education and work outcomes. Preliminary results of the assessments developed from these frameworks show that important advances in teamwork measurement have been enabled by innovative task designs, data-mining techniques, and novel applications of stochastic models.

Originality/value

This novel overview and comparison of interdisciplinary approaches will help to indicate where progress has been made and what challenges are ahead.

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Article
Publication date: 3 April 2018

Matthias von Davier

Surveys that include skill measures may suffer from additional sources of error compared to those containing questionnaires alone. Examples are distractions such as noise…

Abstract

Purpose

Surveys that include skill measures may suffer from additional sources of error compared to those containing questionnaires alone. Examples are distractions such as noise or interruptions of testing sessions, as well as fatigue or lack of motivation to succeed. This paper aims to provide a review of statistical tools based on latent variable modeling approaches extended by explanatory variables that allow detection of survey errors in skill surveys.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper reviews psychometric methods for detecting sources of error in cognitive assessments and questionnaires. Aside from traditional item responses, new sources of data in computer-based assessment are available – timing data from the Programme for the International Assessment of Adult Competencies (PIAAC) and data from questionnaires – to help detect survey errors.

Findings

Some unexpected results are reported. Respondents who tend to use response sets have lower expected values on PIAAC literacy scales, even after controlling for scores on the skill-use scale that was used to derive the response tendency.

Originality/value

The use of new sources of data, such as timing and log-file or process data information, provides new avenues to detect response errors. It demonstrates that large data collections need to better utilize available information and that integration of assessment, modeling and substantive theory needs to be taken more seriously.

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 10 June 2014

Takahiro Ando, Hirokazu Yatsu, Weiqiang Kong, Kenji Hisazumi and Akira Fukuda

This study aims to describe the behavior of blocks in the system under consideration using systems modeling language (SysML) state machine diagrams. In this paper…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to describe the behavior of blocks in the system under consideration using systems modeling language (SysML) state machine diagrams. In this paper, formalization and model checking for SysML state machine diagrams have been investigated.

Design/methodology/approach

The work by Zhang and Liu (2010) proposed a formalization of SysML state machine diagrams in which the diagrams were translated into CSP# processes that could be verified by the state-of-the-art model checker PAT. In this paper, several modifications have been made and new rules have been added to the translation described in that work.

Findings

First, three translation rules were modified, which apparently are inappropriately defined according to the SysML definition of state machine diagrams. Next, we add new translation rules for two components of the diagrams – junction and choice pseudostates – which have not been dealt with previously. Further, we are implementing the automatic translation system on a web-based model-driven development tool, which reflects on our translation rules.

Originality/value

As the contribution of this work, more reasonable verification results for more general SysML state machine diagrams can be achieved.

Details

International Journal of Web Information Systems, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-0084

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 26 October 2018

Julie Villesseche, Olivier Le Bohec, Christophe Quaireau, Jeremie Nogues, Anne-Laure Besnard, Sandrine Oriez, Fanny De La Haye, Yvonnick Noel and Karine Lavandier

E-learning is part of instructional design and has opened a whole world of new possibilities in terms of learning and teaching. The purpose of this paper is to develop an…

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582

Abstract

Purpose

E-learning is part of instructional design and has opened a whole world of new possibilities in terms of learning and teaching. The purpose of this paper is to develop an adaptive e-learning platform that enhances skills from primary school to university learners. Two purposes converge here: a pedagogical one – offering new possibilities, especially in terms of teaching scenarios (blended learning); and a research one – confirming the effectiveness of an adaptive e-learning tool in the case of individualized cross-disciplinary competences, such as comprehension of implicit information in written texts (French).

Design/methodology/approach

The case study presented here concerns primary-school learners using the Implicit module of TACIT adaptive e-learning tool over the 2016-2017 academic year.

Findings

This paper gives a first positive answer to the effectiveness of such a tool in this specific context. This pedagogical effectiveness is more pronounced for low-level pupils, especially for girls and for older pupils (CM1/CM2, respectively, fourth/fifth grade).

Originality/value

In this case study, the module comes from an existing platform, created by the TACIT research group. The adaptive environment was created by using the Item Response Theory models and, more precisely, the Rasch model.

Details

Interactive Technology and Smart Education, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-5659

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1988

David K. Banner and John W. Blasingame

The potential of a probabilistic developmental model of leadership with a possible vast array of organisational applications, suggested by a recent study, is evaluated in…

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1714

Abstract

The potential of a probabilistic developmental model of leadership with a possible vast array of organisational applications, suggested by a recent study, is evaluated in light of the historical development of the leadership construct and to suggest directions for the future. The historical development of leadership theories is explored, the model presented, and its potential and limitations discussed.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 29 January 2021

Olga Zlatkin-Troitschanskaia and Miriam Toepper

This chapter outlines the challenges that research and practice in higher education have faced in measuring students' competences and learning outcomes. Particular…

Abstract

This chapter outlines the challenges that research and practice in higher education have faced in measuring students' competences and learning outcomes. Particular attention is given to the systematic and institutional contexts in Germany. Based on the outlined national and international contextual framework, the Germany-wide program “Modeling and Measuring Competences in Higher Education (KoKoHs)” is discussed in terms of its two central working stages, key outcomes and lessons learned. In particular, the central results of the second phase are presented for the first time and integrated into the current state of international research. Based on this analysis, perspectives for further research on student learning in higher education and implications for practice and policy are derived.

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