Search results

1 – 10 of 261
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 25 March 2021

Elisa Arrigo and Alessandro Brun

Despite menswear is gaining a significant relevance in terms of retail sales, it represents a neglected topic within the academic literature. Therefore, this paper aims at…

Abstract

Purpose

Despite menswear is gaining a significant relevance in terms of retail sales, it represents a neglected topic within the academic literature. Therefore, this paper aims at providing a better understanding of the formal menswear market by developing a tailor-made classification model for the identification of retailers' clusters and at discovering the critical success factors (CSFs).

Design/methodology/approach

This research looked at most formal high-end menswear retailers in Italy adopting a methodology based on the Analytic Hierarchy Process and multiple case studies. Thirty interviews were conducted with experts, managers and shopkeepers from case studies.

Findings

The study develops for the first time a classification framework of formal high-end menswear retailers and a matching matrix to jointly analyse retailers' clusters and customer profiles in Italy. The results identify the CSFs pursued by menswear retailers and highlight the existence of four clusters of retailers (Differentiated Fashion Firms; Formal Menswear Leaders; Tailoring Firms and Luxury Brands) and seven customer profiles (Habitual Professionals, Special Events, Young People, Occasional Professionals, Foreigners, VIPs and Fashionistas).

Originality/value

The formal high-end menswear represents one of the most traditional Italian heritage markets while being almost ignored in the academic literature. Thus, the value of this research lays in deepening our understanding of this market from the retailers' perspective, by providing for the first time a taxonomy of its players and contributing to identifying the CSFs and the main customer profiles.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 49 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 1998

Hsiu‐chuan Huang and John Willans

Given the high costs of creating and sustaining brands it is not surprising that organisations wish to capitalise as far as possible on these assets. Designers and their…

Abstract

Given the high costs of creating and sustaining brands it is not surprising that organisations wish to capitalise as far as possible on these assets. Designers and their financial backers are also active in this process; many of their customers or would‐be customers aspire to the label but not at the market level initially catered for. Extending brands has, as the literature attests, implications for the designer, manufacturer, retailer and customer. The purpose of this small‐scale study was to examine the phenomenon at least as it relates to menswear, from the perspective of the independent retailer, who still has a major role to play in this market.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 September 1998

Grete Birtwistle and Paul Freathy

UK fashion retailing is characterised by high levels of market concentration, centralisation and outlet standardisation. In the pursuit of market share, the multiple…

Downloads
10660

Abstract

UK fashion retailing is characterised by high levels of market concentration, centralisation and outlet standardisation. In the pursuit of market share, the multiple fashion retailers are implementing branding strategies that aim to differentiate their product offer and reinforce their market positioning. Empirical research, via key informant interviews, examined the branding decisions of two multiple fashion retailers and established four main methods of brand differentiation.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 26 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 May 1989

Norman E. Marr

Physical distribution management in New Zealand, is still, in manycompanies, subordinate to other functions in the corporateorganisational hierarchy. In this study of…

Abstract

Physical distribution management in New Zealand, is still, in many companies, subordinate to other functions in the corporate organisational hierarchy. In this study of three industries (Menswear, Foodstuffs and Pharmaceuticals) it was found that most distribution executives were responsible for warehousing and transport with very little involvement in setting customer service levels, the very essence of physical distribution. These results were surprising considering that it was claimed that there existed a large degree of awareness about the importance of physical distribution in terms of a company′s overall success. The actual level of adoption and successful implementation of an Integrated Physical Distribution system was around 50 per cent. Here there was considerable disagreement between top management of a company and the senior distribution executive. These conclusions were drawn from the response by the General Manager/CEO of participating companies, together with independent responses from the person in the company “responsible for the planning and control of the distribution activities”. These responses were examined in three distinct areas: attitudes towards distribution, adoption of integrated distribution concept and company organisation of distribution activities.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Materials Management, vol. 19 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0269-8218

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 9 July 2019

Youn-Kyung Kim, Sejin Ha and Soo-Hee Park

The purpose of this paper is to identify men’s clothing market segments based on store types and generational cohorts and the retail attributes.

Downloads
1317

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify men’s clothing market segments based on store types and generational cohorts and the retail attributes.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 2,808 US male consumer data from Predictive Analytics survey were analyzed with correspondence analysis (CA) (to identify segments based on store types and generations), general linear model (GLM) (to determine what retail attributes were important to target each segment) and a Rasch tree model (to test items of each factor in their relative importance).

Findings

The CA produced three segments: Segment 1 (Gen Y male consumers who frequently shop at specialty stores), Segment 2 (Gen X males who frequently shop at discount stores and online stores) and Segment 3 (Baby Boomers and Seniors who frequently shop at department stores). GLM shows that fundamentals were important to all segments; experiential was most important to Segment 1, while promotion was most important to Segment 3. Rasch tree analysis provided specific information on retail attributes for each store type and each generation.

Research limitations/implications

Future research could employ both the importance and performance of retail attributes that are measured on a rating scale to understand consumers’ attitudes toward each retail format.

Practical implications

This study provided men’s clothing retailers with current insights into the male consumer segments based upon generational cohorts and store types from which they can better develop appropriate positioning strategies to satisfy the needs of each segment.

Originality/value

This study addressed the men’s clothing market, a growing but largely ignored market in the clothing industry and the retail literature.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 47 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 April 1991

Norman E. Marr

The degree of association between sophistication in distributionmanagement and service performance differs across industries. Whilethere are significant associations with…

Downloads
122

Abstract

The degree of association between sophistication in distribution management and service performance differs across industries. While there are significant associations with some of the indicators of management sophistication in all three industries used in this study, there was no consistency in the results. The only industry for which there was statistical support for a positive association between management sophistication and service performance is foodstuffs. Even this only indicates poor service providers were less sophisticated management. For all three industry groups there is evidence that factors, other than the level of management sophistication, have influenced the service rankings. The differences in the relevant importance of customer service and the various elements of distribution service may be one such factor. The inconclusiveness of association results may have been contributed to by the failure to take into account inter‐relationships between various subsets of management variables.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 April 2001

Pietro Romano and Andrea Vinelli

Supply chain management (SCM) is conceived by academics and practitioners as either an extension of logistics or an all‐encompassing approach to business integration. From…

Downloads
8050

Abstract

Supply chain management (SCM) is conceived by academics and practitioners as either an extension of logistics or an all‐encompassing approach to business integration. From the authors’ point of view, SCM involves not only logistic activities but also other processes such as quality management. This paper seeks to understand how quality can be managed using a supply chain perspective and what the operative and strategic consequences are for both the individual companies and the whole supply network. It reports a case study conducted on Marzotto, an important Italian textile and apparel company, and its supply chain relationships. The study compares the quality practices in the two different kinds of supply network of which Marzotto is the focal firm. One is managed using a traditional customer‐supplier approach and the other a broader and more co‐ordinated perspective. In the latter case, it was found that the whole supply network could improve its ability to meet the expectations of the final consumer in terms of quality through the joint definition and co‐management of quality practices/procedures.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 30 April 2021

Veronica Manlow and Christopher Ferree

We examine the work undertaken by salespersons in the menswear department of a well-known department store in New York City that sells specialized “luxury” clothing by…

Abstract

We examine the work undertaken by salespersons in the menswear department of a well-known department store in New York City that sells specialized “luxury” clothing by using the theoretical perspective developed by Kenneth Burke, the philosopher of language and communication. He has argued that the most comprehensive way to describe human conduct is to examine what was done, what attitude did it manifest, where was it done, who did it, and how was it done. Burke summarized these questions as act, attitude, scene, agent, agency, and purpose. With these terms comprising a “hexad,” a great deal of complexity can be captured within an organizational context. Indeed, Burke refers to these terms as “the grammar of motives” – that is, the motives of human conduct (1969a, 1968). In the carefully staged menswear environment we find salesmen who negotiate the goals and purposes of the store as well as their individual motives through implicitly defined sequences of acts on the selling floor.

Details

Radical Interactionism and Critiques of Contemporary Culture
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-029-8

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 18 January 2011

Catherine Jukes

Downloads
641

Abstract

Details

Reference Reviews, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0950-4125

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 January 1977

Overall performance of retail shares was bad during 1976. The list of sector leaders and laggards compiled at the beginning of January shows food and non food retailing…

Abstract

Overall performance of retail shares was bad during 1976. The list of sector leaders and laggards compiled at the beginning of January shows food and non food retailing well into the final half of the performance tables with falls of just over 10 per cent apiece. Although share prices have improved since the New Year in line with the market generally, stores, for instance showed a rise of just over 9 per cent, as against a market rise of over 11 per cent in the month running up to the middle of January. This lacklustre performance is hardly surprising in view of the fact that the trend in retail sales last year was flat or falling for most of the period. Earlier hopes of a growth in consumer spending during the autumn and winter were demolished by higher unemployment and the fall in sterling, which ate into disposable income through higher prices for some food and other imported goods. Profits, however, were a very different story, with margins, particularly in the food retailing sector, showing some very good improvement following the slowdown in wage increases and an easier position on the financing of stocks. But recovery here had already been discounted in a small rise in retail shares earlier on in the year, although this was evidently not maintained when it became apparent that the recession in the industry was deeper than first suspected. There is some evidence that retail sales are now showing some recovery. November's sales figures, for instance show a 17 per cent rise in value for that month over the same period of 1975 as against a rise of only 15 per cent for eleven months of the year overall. Food volume, in the wake of stiff price increases, is down by a percentage point, although the textile based sectors are apparently showing some improvement. But there is very little to encourage the view that a consumer boom is just round the corner, with unemployment continuing to increase, and what looks like yet another year of restricted wage increases. And retailing is not going to feature much in the sort of export led prosperity now being encouraged by the government. Apart from the now fabled presence of overseas shoppers in Oxford Street retailers are hindered, not helped by the fall in sterling. But obviously the consumers' pent up demand for goods will lead to a profits explosion if the economic climate turns warmer during the next few years. If there is going to be a bull market in shares based on oil prosperity in the 1980's retail shares will, as always be one of the sectors leading the market. They have been out of favour, with the occasional fillip for a good three years now, but still represent some solid value, not just in the relative stability of their earnings but in the large property base enjoyed by many of the famous High Street names.

Details

Retail and Distribution Management, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-2363

1 – 10 of 261