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Article
Publication date: 30 August 2021

Hilda Monoarfa, Agus Rahayu, Fitranty Adirestuty, Rizuwan Abu Karim, Azlin Zanariah Bahtar, Zamzuri Ahmad Nazari and Nurazree Mahmud

The purpose of this study is to find out the level of influence of Islamic attributes and pull motivation to the satisfaction of Muslim tourists visiting Indonesia…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to find out the level of influence of Islamic attributes and pull motivation to the satisfaction of Muslim tourists visiting Indonesia. Furthermore, this study may reveal where variables have a strong influence on the variable satisfaction of Muslim tourists. In addition, this study also wanted to know if Islamic attributes can influence the satisfaction of Muslim tourists with pull motivation as a moderating variable.

Design/methodology/approach

Using quantitative methods, this study analyzed the results of questionnaires that have been distributed to 200 Muslim tourist respondents who have visited Indonesia. To declare the hypotheses, the collected data were analyzed with structural equation modeling-partial least square using SmartPLS application version 3.2.7.

Findings

From this study, it was discovered that pull motivation has more effect on the satisfaction of Muslim tourists visiting Indonesia. Other results showed that both Islamic attributes and pull motivation simultaneously affect the satisfaction of Muslim tourists. Furthermore, Islamic attributes can affect pull motivation and pull motivation can also become an intermediary variable in bridging the impact of Islamic attributes on the satisfaction of Muslim tourists.

Research limitations/implications

The limitations of this study include the relatively small sample used and not yet taking foreign tourists as respondents. Besides that, you can also add several variables to complement this research in the future either as an intervening variable or a mediator variable.

Practical implications

To increase the satisfaction of Muslim tourists traveling to Indonesia, policymakers in Indonesia must further improve the facilities of the pull motivation aspect such as the cleanliness of tourist attractions, exotic locations and hygienic shopping centers. In addition, aspects of Islamic attributes must also be updated, such as aspects of adequate worship facilities and tourist attractions that apply the concept of halal for Muslims.

Originality/value

The originality of this study on the pull motivation variable as an intervening variable and adding the Islamic attribute variable in the case of Muslim tourist satisfaction.

Details

International Journal of Tourism Cities, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-5607

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Article
Publication date: 21 September 2012

Christopher Dawson and Andrew Henley

The purpose of this paper is to reassess whether individuals choose to become self‐employed for “pull” or “push” reasons, to discuss and describe ambiguities in this…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to reassess whether individuals choose to become self‐employed for “pull” or “push” reasons, to discuss and describe ambiguities in this distinction, with focus on differences between men and women, and draw conclusions for further conceptual work.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reviews current literature, from which specific hypotheses are developed. For illustration and evaluation secondary analysis is undertaken of an existing large‐scale data source available in UK Quarterly Labour Force Surveys over the period 1999‐2001.

Findings

It was found that 86 per cent state only a single reason for self‐employment. Response patterns differ significantly between men and women. Independence is the most commonly cited motivation but 22 per cent of women cite family commitments. “Push” motivations may account for as much as 48 per cent depending on interpretation. Men who report two or more factors tend to combine “pull” factors, but women tend to combine “push” with “pull”.

Research limitations/implications

Respondents may display recall bias. Potential ambiguity in the way in which respondents may interpret particular motivations points to the need for future detailed qualitative research, and questionnaire item development. Further work is recommended to assess whether conclusions hold in recent recessionary economic conditions.

Practical implications

Clarity between “push” and “pull” factors is important in the design of entrepreneurship policy, especially during a recession. Further work is needed to provide this clarity to inform policy design.

Originality/value

Few previous studies investigate reasons for choosing entrepreneurship using large, population‐generalisable data, and do not consider the conceptual ambiguities inherent in categorising motivations as either “pull” or “push”.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 18 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

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Article
Publication date: 10 October 2008

Antónia Correia and Adriano Pimpão

This paper aims to study the decision‐making processes of Portuguese tourists traveling to South America and Africa destinations by developing a conceptual framework that…

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3616

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to study the decision‐making processes of Portuguese tourists traveling to South America and Africa destinations by developing a conceptual framework that focuses on information sources, motivations, perceptions, satisfactions, and behavioral intentions.

Design/methodology/approach

The study applies a structural model that looks to explain the factors behind decision making and the relationships present. The relationships are observed in detail through the application of a categorical principal component analysis.

Findings

The results of the empirical study show that behavioral intentions precede emotional and cognitive satisfaction, which in turn, are explained through perceptions and motivations. Tourists perceive tourism destinations as places of leisure although little information is available on existing facilities and core attractions.

Research limitations/implications

The study has the restriction of being limited to the Portuguese tourists. However, these findings open paths for further investigation, namely extending to other destinations and to tourists with different motivations.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the overall understanding of the decision‐making processes of tourists. Specifically, the decision processes is assess by considering two stages: the pre‐purchase stage and the post‐purchase stage. These two phases were analyzed in order to understand how people decide to travel to a certain destination.

Details

International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, vol. 2 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6182

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Article
Publication date: 20 September 2011

Juho Pesonen, Raija Komppula, Christopher Kronenberg and Mike Peters

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the differences and relationships of push and pull motivations in two different rural tourism destinations.

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7352

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the differences and relationships of push and pull motivations in two different rural tourism destinations.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from tourists visiting rural tourism companies in Finland and in Tyrol (Austria). The data were analyzed using analysis of variance and correlation coefficients.

Findings

The results indicate significant differences of push and pull motivations in the two regions. In addition, tourists motivated by different variables obviously search for different destination attributes. For example, tourists motivated by the search of a once‐in‐a‐lifetime experience expect different destination attributes than those respondents searching for a sense of comfort or an opportunity to relax.

Research limitations/implications

The low sample size in both Tyrol and Finland reduces the generalizability of the results.

Practical implications

The findings can be used by rural tourism companies and practitioners to understand how push and pull motivations affect tourist behaviour. Based on this information, marketing initiatives can be customized for various target segments in this particular market.

Originality/value

This is the first paper to examine the inter‐relationship between push and pull motivations in rural tourism and one of the most detailed studies on rural tourist motivations. Additionally, the comparison of the two countries underlines the assumption, that cultural or macro‐economic variables strongly influence push and pull motivations of consumers.

Details

Tourism Review, vol. 66 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1660-5373

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Article
Publication date: 20 November 2017

Vanessa Quintal, Ben Thomas, Ian Phau and Zorana Soldat

The study aims to introduce a comprehensive segmentation instrument that incorporates the push–pull winescape attributes, providing a new perspective of the wine tourist…

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1234

Abstract

Purpose

The study aims to introduce a comprehensive segmentation instrument that incorporates the push–pull winescape attributes, providing a new perspective of the wine tourist profile and explaining their behavioural intentions in the Australian winescape.

Design/methodology/approach

A literature review, focus groups and expert panels generated an extensive list of push–pull winescape attributes. Pen-and-paper surveys conveniently sampled 739 wine tourists at three wineries across three wine regions in Australia. Adopting push–pull winescape attributes as the segmentation base, cluster analysis identified four segments, namely, inspireds, self-drivens, market-drivens and inerts, and their behavioural intentions were examined.

Findings

Inspireds demonstrate both self- and market-motivation. Self-drivens exhibit self-motivation but limited market-motivation, whereas Market-drivens characterise market-motivation but limited self-motivation. Inerts are limited in both market- and self-motivations. At the Swan Valley, all four segments were identified, with Inspireds being the most willing to revisit and recommend to others and Inerts, the least willing. At the Barossa Valley, only two segments emerged. Again, Inspireds and Inerts were the most and least willing to revisit and recommend to others respectively. Finally, at the Yarra Valley, three segments were identified. Market-drivens were most willing to revisit and recommend to others, followed by self-drivens and lastly, by inerts.

Research limitations/implications

A comprehensive push–pull winescape segmentation base of wine tourists is introduced, which provides a more sophisticated profile of wine tourist segments than otherwise would be attained with conventional measures.

Practical implications

New insights into who the wine tourist is and what it is they seek from the winescape are vital to smaller wine producers whose best access to the domestic retail and export markets is through direct selling at the cellar door.

Originality/value

The empirically tested 18-item push–pull winescape instrument presents a comprehensive segmentation approach, which profiles wine tourists and predicts their behavioural intentions based on an extensive investigation of push–pull winescape attributes.

Details

International Journal of Wine Business Research, vol. 29 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1062

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Article
Publication date: 4 December 2017

Sanja Bozic, James Kennell, Miroslav D. Vujicic and Tamara Jovanovic

The purpose of this paper is to develop a new perspective on urban tourist motivations by applying the analytic hierarchy process (AHP) model to help to understand how…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop a new perspective on urban tourist motivations by applying the analytic hierarchy process (AHP) model to help to understand how tourists make decisions about which destinations to visit.

Design/methodology/approach

This study was based on 30 one-hour-long structured interviews with visitors to Ljubljana, the capital city of Slovenia. Respondents were asked to express their preferences between different pull-factor motives for their visit, using Saaty’s scale, and further qualitative data were collected to examine these preferences in more depth.

Findings

The results of this study indicate that the most relevant criteria and thus predominant factors in motivation for visits to Ljubljana are the Cultural and Nightlife pull factors, while religious and business motives are the lowest ranked factors. The paper argues that the results show the value of applying the AHP model to understand the role of pull factors in urban tourism destination choice.

Research limitations/implications

As a single-destination case study, it is important that the findings of this research are evaluated against similar studies in other cities. A limitation of this research is the fact that sub motives within major groups of pull-factor motives have not been explored in this study and this should be the subject of future, more detailed research.

Originality/value

This research shows the value of applying an under-used methodology to understand urban tourist motivations and knowledge gained through applying this method will be of value to destination marketing organisations as well as to researchers conducting future studies.

Details

International Journal of Tourism Cities, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-5607

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Article
Publication date: 5 May 2015

Ling Guan, Yi Luo and Liang Rebecca Tang

The purpose of this paper is to identify push and pull factors that motivate decision makers to choose wedding banquet venues, and to explore the relationships between the…

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2520

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify push and pull factors that motivate decision makers to choose wedding banquet venues, and to explore the relationships between the motivational factors and demographic information.

Design/methodology/approach

The initial questionnaire was pre-tested involving a sample of six graduate students in a hospitality management program of a major university in the Midwestern USA. The wordings were changed based on their feedback. The final survey was consisted of three sections: push motivations, pull motivations, and demographic information. In the first section, 13 push motivation statements were employed to investigate decision makers' reasons for selecting a wedding banquet venue.

Findings

The four push factors identified included “seeking relaxation and knowledge,” “fulfilling prestige,” “escaping from daily routine,” and “social networking.” The six pull factors were composed of “budget,” “atmosphere,” “facilities,” “wedding services,” “transportation,” and “service and quality.”

Originality/value

The study helps event industry practitioners understand consumers’ motivations of choosing wedding venues and predict consumers’ behavior. It further suggests marketing strategies to effectively communicate with existing and potential consumers.

Details

International Journal of Tourism Cities, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-5607

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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2017

Noela Michael, Charlotte Wien and Yvette Reisinger

The purpose of this study is to examine the escape motivations of the emerging market and provide suggestions for Australia’s promotion. This study adopts the push and pull

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2531

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the escape motivations of the emerging market and provide suggestions for Australia’s promotion. This study adopts the push and pull framework to identify travel motivations of Emirati nationals to Australia.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses a series of focus groups and in-depth interviews to understand the escape motivations that encourage Emiratis to leave their home country and travel to Australia for a holiday.

Findings

The results indicate that Emiratis are motivated to travel to Australia by three escape factors: physical, interpersonal and fun. The internal motivations that encourage Emiratis to escape their home country are inseparable from Australia’s external attributes that attract the Emiratis to the country.

Originality/value

The study contributes to the theory of tourist motivation by supporting it in the culturally different Muslim/Arab context, which has not been explored before. The authors argue that it is not so much what Australia offers and what escape needs the Emiratis can fulfil in Australia, but rather that Australia serves the Emiratis well and meets their escape needs.

Details

International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6182

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Book part
Publication date: 3 August 2011

Mehmet Mehmetoglu

Tourism motivation is a prerequisite in understanding tourist behavior. Push and pull factors have provided a simple framework for comprehending tourism motivation in…

Abstract

Tourism motivation is a prerequisite in understanding tourist behavior. Push and pull factors have provided a simple framework for comprehending tourism motivation in various contexts. Nevertheless, many of the propositions related to the push–pull framework have rarely been empirically examined. One of these suggests that pull factors both respond to and reinforce push factors. The current study, consequently, examines this twofold proposition empirically through partial least-squares path modeling. The findings indicate that push factors influence the tourism-demand variable (length of vacation) via pull factors and vice versa. Further, the findings indicate that the total effects of push and pull factors on the tourism-demand variable of the study are nearly equal. Theoretical and practical implications are also provided.

Details

Advances in Hospitality and Leisure
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-769-8

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1996

Seyhmus Baloglu and Muzaffer Uysal

Evaluates a technique which allows the simultaneous examination of push and pull motivations. The relationship between these two motivations for overseas pleasure travel…

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15736

Abstract

Evaluates a technique which allows the simultaneous examination of push and pull motivations. The relationship between these two motivations for overseas pleasure travel has been studied for a German sample of 1,212 respondents. Argues that the information generated from this analysis could provide significant insight and marketing advantage when segmenting travellers, designing promotional programmes and packages, and in making decisions about destination product development.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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