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Article
Publication date: 17 August 2015

Jeeah Hwang and Martin Kunc

– This paper aims to explore the dynamics and performance of on-premise wine trade business.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the dynamics and performance of on-premise wine trade business.

Design/methodology/approach

The study involved in-depth interviews with six on-premise businesses in Seoul, South Korea. The data obtained were methodically analysed to understand the impact of different variables through a qualitative business dynamic model.

Findings

Customer satisfaction and number of customers are key performance factors for on-premise wine trade business. Customer satisfaction is driven by servicescape, wine lists and front-line employees. However, the length of wine list impacts directly on inventory costs and staff knowledge, while the number of service staff in the business has a non-linear effect on profits, as service staff does not grow linearly with the number of customers.

Research limitations/implications

One important limitation is that the business dynamics model, which is based on South Korean cases, used only owners/sommeliers’ perspectives but not consumers’ perspectives. There are two implications. First, in terms of on-premise wine trade, the alignment of servicespace, front-line employees, wine lists and pricing strategy is key to shape customers’ expectations and confirm the market positioning of the business. Second, for wineries, understanding the dynamics of on-premise wine trade can help them to find strategies to position their wines.

Originality/value

The paper offers two contributions. Firstly, the paper provides the first exploratory study on the business dynamics of on-premise wine trade businesses, which complements existing wine-buying behaviour studies. Secondly, the study explores the on-trade channel in South Korea, providing insights into an important Asian market.

Details

International Journal of Wine Business Research, vol. 27 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1062

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Article
Publication date: 16 March 2012

Nicholas C. Williamson, Joy Bhadury, Kay Dobie, Victor Ofori‐Boadu, Samuel Parker Troy and Osei Yeboah

The purpose of this paper is to determine whether one can infer the identities of specific business and management coursework topics that owner/managers of wineries want…

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2597

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to determine whether one can infer the identities of specific business and management coursework topics that owner/managers of wineries want to have addressed by a wine industry‐specific educational institution by assessing upstream and downstream vertical integration strategies of their respective wineries.

Design/methodology/approach

Exploratory empirical research involves the gathering of relevant information by way of telephone interviews and using closed end questions. The theory of the resource‐based view (RBV) of the firm is the theoretical framework that was employed in developing relevant hypotheses.

Findings

The results demonstrate that one can predict the types of business and management courses that owner/managers of wineries want to have offered by assessing realized upstream and/or downstream vertical integration strategies of their respective wineries.

Originality/value

The research creates a bridge between research involving the RBV and the identification of needs of persons in various parts of the wine value chain. Such persons might either become involved in conceiving and/or rendering wine industry‐specific business and management instruction, or benefit by taking business coursework that has been established as relevant for them by this research.

Details

International Journal of Wine Business Research, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1062

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2005

Elizabeth C. Thach, Ms Thoraya Halhoul and Jay Robertson

What types of wine business practices have the most impact on employee productivity, leading to profitability? This qualitative study attempts to answer this question…

Abstract

What types of wine business practices have the most impact on employee productivity, leading to profitability? This qualitative study attempts to answer this question based on interviews and survey data from 109 winery and vineyard operations across the US. A total of 33 management practices were identified using a qualitative content analysis methodology; including the major categories of management communication, hiring, training, and positive incentive systems. Results suggest areas for future research, as well as simple and cost‐effective management practices which wineries and vineyards can implement now.

Details

International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

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Article
Publication date: 13 May 2014

Sidsel Grimstad and John Burgess

The paper aims to examine the competitive advantage of the environmental behaviour at a firm level and micro-cluster level, building the analysis on Harts model of natural…

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2375

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to examine the competitive advantage of the environmental behaviour at a firm level and micro-cluster level, building the analysis on Harts model of natural resource-based view of the firm and by using Brown et al.'s framework for analysing contextual resources that would provide locational advantage based on environmental behaviour. The case study examines the drivers and the obstacles to environmental action and demonstrates how clustering has been important in progressing a sustainability agenda.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study of a single wine tourism cluster in Australia is undertaken using mixed methods.

Findings

The main drivers for environmental action are genuine concerns for the environment by the cluster participants, especially water conservation in the Australian context. Supporting this is the co-ordination of the Lovedale Chamber of Commerce which has promoted its “greening Lovedale” project as a source of regional identity and potential competitive advantage. The obstacles to action are those that are present when small firms dominate, a lack of resources and a lack of know how. Through clustering small businesses can share resources, access specialists and share knowledge.

Research limitations/implications

A single cluster case study within the Australian and the wine tourism context confined to one point in time.

Practical implications

The clustering of firms in agricultural regions offers the opportunity to achieve individual and collective benefits. Clustering participation can reduce costs, achieve scale economies and share knowledge. These advantages are relevant for environmental actions. In the context of weak or absent government actions and regulations over the environment, regional clusters can utilise the advantages of clustering to meet environmental goals. These in turn can contribute to regional identity and regional comparative advantage. These issues are addressed through the study of the Lovedale wine cluster in Australia.

Originality/value

There are few studies of how clustered agricultural industries are addressing environmental challenges independently of central government directives or subsidies. Clustering enables small firms to participate in environmental programs despite being faced by resource and knowledge shortages.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. 37 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 19 June 2017

Christopher Karl Köhr, Giulio Malorgio and Maurizio Aragrande

The purpose of this paper is to explore the determinants of internationalisation among late starters in the wine sector. Strategic implications for small and medium…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the determinants of internationalisation among late starters in the wine sector. Strategic implications for small and medium enterprises (SMEs) in a young wine producing region are derived based on the findings.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected through a quantitative survey among 38 wineries that are engaged in export activity in the Romagna wine producing area (Italy). Both multivariate analysis of cardinal company data through multiple and fractional regression models as well as nonparametric analysis of Likert-type survey elements were carried out.

Findings

The study identifies several determinants that affect the export intensity of businesses in the sample: Resources within the business turn out to be important, as well as the choice of distribution partners. Characteristics of exported goods were found to differ on comparing intra- and extra-EU exports.

Practical implications

Competitiveness in the international marketplace is closely linked to the product quality, distribution network and productivity of a firm. Regional networks can help businesses to develop these factors, overcome export barriers and strengthen the competitiveness of a region as a whole.

Originality/value

This study investigated the determinants of internationalisation in a wine producing region which is considered a late starter of internationalisation in the wine industry and it is the first one spotlighting on a regional firm-level in the Italian wine industry.

Details

International Journal of Wine Business Research, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1062

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 5 June 2019

Lea Iaia, Demetris Vrontis, Amedeo Maizza, Monica Fait, Paola Scorrano and Federica Cavallo

The purpose of this paper is to identify the distinctive elements of CSR communications that characterize the communications models of family businesses in the Italian wine

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the distinctive elements of CSR communications that characterize the communications models of family businesses in the Italian wine industry, and to compare them with nonfamily businesses.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a case study approach, a sample of large and medium companies practicing corporate social responsibility was identified. The content of their websites was examined using content analysis and text mining (correspondence analysis techniques and word association analysis using the T-Lab software).

Findings

The analysis indicates that the ownership structure nature makes a difference in the online CSR communications process. The cultural identity in both family and nonfamily businesses is founded on intangible factors such as tradition; however, being a family business is a fundamental driver in the online CSR communications process, no longer forming a bond among players in the wine industry, but rather linking with other wine family businesses.

Research limitations/implications

One limitation of this work is the small size of the investigated sample. An added value it contributes is its focus on the Italian wine industry. The paper provides the essential elements that family and nonfamily wine businesses should consider in customizing their CSR communications with the brand’s specific details.

Originality/value

The authors highlighted the similarities and differences of family and nonfamily wine businesses in terms of their online CSR communications. The authors also observed how the family wine business identity, in its multidimensional construct, has common factors with what we call “familiness.” This research could establish a starting point for further work within this important sector.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 121 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 6 June 2008

Steve Charters, Marilyn Clark‐Murphy, Nicole Davis, Alan Brown and Elizabeth Walker

The purpose of this paper is to identify the key management skills for running a successful winery business, which in the Australian industry is predominately a small to…

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1097

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the key management skills for running a successful winery business, which in the Australian industry is predominately a small to medium sized business, and explores the existence of such skills within the industry.

Design/methodology/approach

The information was obtained through structured interviews with a range of winery owners and managers in the four main wine regions of Western Australia.

Findings

Whilst a set of universal management skills are identified by the industry participants, these are not universally held. The study examines skills and training issues highlighting the diversity of winery owners and managers.

Research limitations/implications

The study was conducted using qualitative methodology in one state of Australia only.

Practical implications

The findings require further quantitative testing, but strongly imply that managerial skills in the wine industry are limited, and most managers are more focused on technical expertise than financial, strategic, marketing or HR planning and management.

Originality/value

The paper has benefit for the wine industry showing the strengths and weaknesses of its managers, and also for theorists who seek to understand management processes in a specific sector predominantly comprising small and medium sized enterprises.

Details

International Journal of Wine Business Research, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1062

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Article
Publication date: 18 June 2018

Armand Gilinsky Jr, Sharon Lee Forbes and Rosana Fuentes-Fernández

The purpose of this paper is to investigate philanthropic practices in the US wine industry, as prior research on charitable giving by wine industry participants is…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate philanthropic practices in the US wine industry, as prior research on charitable giving by wine industry participants is limited. Earlier studies on corporate philanthropy are inconclusive about the direction and the degree of community philanthropy on organizational effectiveness. There are also notable research gaps, including the lack of research into philanthropy in small businesses and the dominance of US studies.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper reviews the literature on corporate social responsibility and philanthropy, presents a series of propositions and a theoretical model, sets forth a research schema to investigate to what extent philanthropic activities are motivated by altruistic as well as strategic considerations across the global wine industry and reports preliminary findings from a sample of 100 US wine producers.

Findings

In brief, 99 per cent of the wine businesses surveyed significantly engaged in altruistic behavior in their local communities, primarily helped local charities, donated at the median 150 cases each year, and those activities represented about 1 per cent of pre-tax profits, comparable to or above giving by other participants in other industries.

Research limitations/implications

As survey data were self-reported, empirical proof has yet to be obtained to support or refute the findings of this investigation. Comparisons to philanthropic practices in other wine regions of the world are not yet completed.

Practical implications

Wine producers pursue community stewardship and maintain good corporate citizenship to create direct benefits apart from economic growth or jobs, but future research is needed to ascertain whether motivations are primarily altruistic or strategic.

Social implications

Communities embrace the presence of wine businesses to foster job creation and economic activity, but remain uncertain about the other community benefits.

Originality/value

This exploratory paper fills a major gap in understanding with respect to examining motives for giving and expected outcomes by wine industry participants.

Details

International Journal of Wine Business Research, vol. 30 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1062

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 13 March 2017

Susan L. Golicic, Daniel J. Flint and Paola Signori

The purpose of this paper is to address how wine businesses build sustainability – the ability to survive and be successful over the long-term – in a complex market environment.

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1569

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to address how wine businesses build sustainability – the ability to survive and be successful over the long-term – in a complex market environment.

Design/methodology/approach

To understand how managers in a wine supply chain (i.e. from grower to consumer) are trying to sustain business within a hyper-competitive industry, the authors used a standard grounded theory, constant comparative research method using formal depth interviews along with additional data sources from wine businesses in nine global wine regions in the USA, Australia, Italy and New Zealand.

Findings

A framework emerged from the data to improve business sustainability and counteract the complexity in the wine market by developing resilience through innovating and experimenting, obtaining resources/developing capabilities and relying on supply chain connections.

Research limitations/implications

This conceptual framework contributes to the existing theory on institutional transitions and resilience in business, and extends and broadens it by proposing that resilience is needed to combat entropy in the wine industry for businesses in this industry to survive and thrive.

Practical implications

Managers can learn from and apply the examples mentioned in this study and follow the framework presented to implement the strategies to build resilience to increase their chances of sustainability.

Originality/value

This study is one of the first empirical studies to the authors’ knowledge that identifies the impact of entropy in the wine industry and examines resilience as a means to combat an entropic market and obtain business sustainability.

Details

International Journal of Wine Business Research, vol. 29 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1062

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Article
Publication date: 6 August 2018

Anatoliy G. Goncharuk

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate and compare the efficiency of wine making in Germany and Ukraine in order to find the controllable factors of wine business

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate and compare the efficiency of wine making in Germany and Ukraine in order to find the controllable factors of wine business performance using benchmarking tools.

Design/methodology/approach

The models of data envelopment analysis and other benchmarking tools are used to analyse the efficiency of wineries in two countries. Returns to scale, scale efficiency, super-efficiency and some other indicators are examined. The research is based on the sample of 36 German and Ukrainian wineries.

Findings

The hypothesis of higher wine making relative efficiency in Germany was compared with Ukrainian wine making, then analytically and statistically verified. A relatively high average scale efficiency score indicates good potential (above 30 per cent) for efficiency growth, due to the optimisation of a scale of production and sales. Generally, wine making in Germany and Ukraine has increasing returns to scale. The high-efficient wine business cannot bring great losses. It was found that the most efficient combinations of size and legal form of business organisation for wine business are presented in Germany.

Research limitations/implications

The research is limited by a single industry of only the two countries.

Practical implications

This study provides useful information for researchers, investors and policy makers, enabling them to understand the current state, basic problems, controllable factors and efficiency levels of wine making in Germany and Ukraine. It may be useful to wine producers in these countries for improving their business performance.

Originality/value

This is the first paper that compares wine business performance and discloses its factors for Germany and Ukraine.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 25 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

Keywords

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