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Article
Publication date: 27 January 2021

Pankaj Singh, Anees Ahmad, Gyan Prakash and Prabhat Kumar Singh Kushwah

The purpose of this paper is to take the neglected influencing factors in brand alliance research into account based on consumer characteristics theory and discuss the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to take the neglected influencing factors in brand alliance research into account based on consumer characteristics theory and discuss the influencing factors' interactive effects on brand alliance.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on the theory of consumer characteristics and the S&R model of brand alliance, an experimental design was conducted to examine the relationship among the various variables and moderators, which can test the changes of the dependent variables by controlling and manipulating one or more single variables. The sample includes 400 college students.

Findings

The results demonstrate that brand knowledge positively moderates the relationship between brand equity and consumer brand alliance, but not significantly affect the relationship between alliance evaluation and joint fit; in contrast, product involvement individually plays a positive moderating role on the relationship between joint fit, brand equity and consumer brand alliance evaluation.

Originality/value

Two consumer characteristic, brand knowledge and product involvement moderate the relationship between brand equity, joint fit and consumer brand alliance evaluation. Several empirical studies on brand alliance have documented mostly positive effects of brand alliance on consumer brand evaluations. Two important consumer characteristics' effect on brand alliance evaluation, brand knowledge and product involvement, were testified to expand the scope of influential factors of brand alliance evaluation on the basis of consumers' characteristic theory.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 33 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

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Article
Publication date: 8 November 2018

Xiaoye Chen and Rong Huang

This paper aims to investigate whether corporate social responsibility (CSR) efforts that are oriented toward shared value creation generate any perceptual advantages in…

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1215

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate whether corporate social responsibility (CSR) efforts that are oriented toward shared value creation generate any perceptual advantages in terms of consumer product attributes evaluations compared with other types of CSR. The study also uncovers consumers’ pathways that channel the impacts of corporate associations on corporate and product evaluations and purchase intention.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses a between-subjects experimental design. In all, 274 undergraduate students from a North American university participated in the 2 (low versus high corporate ability levels) × 4 (CSR types) study. The data were analyzed using the methodologies of path analysis and multiple group analysis in the context of structural equation modeling procedure.

Findings

The findings show that in the context of shared-value CSR, CSR image (i.e. consumer judgments on the moral aspect of the company) can spill over to product attributes evaluations, including perceptions of “product innovativeness” and “product social responsibility,” which, in turn, translate to purchase willingness. Meanwhile, perceived corporate trustworthiness mediates the effects of CSR image and corporate ability (CA) image on the overall corporate evaluation, which subsequently influences consumer product evaluation and purchase intention.

Research limitations/implications

The research provides direct evidence showing that companies have the potential to improve their corporate brand and, in turn, their product evaluations by putting a stronger emphasis on the social responsibility components of their image and placing this at the core of their strategic agenda. Importantly, a contribution to the literature by identifying differential effects of CA image versus CSR image on consumer perception of product innovativeness within different CSR categories is made. The limitations of the research are discussed, which include the usage of a fictitious company and brand and a convenience sample.

Practical implications

The study offers guidance to managers in regard to their choice of different CSR practices to fulfill their company’s product-related strategic goals.

Originality/value

The present study takes a critical stance to show that previous experimental work investigating the impact of CSR image on product evaluations relied predominantly on bipolar manipulations of CSR practices (bad versus good) rather than bringing many shades of CSR into consideration. By incorporating a wide array of CSR formats, especially value-creating CSR, current research generates potential implications based on differential effects of various CSR focuses, which have not been captured by previous studies.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 27 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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Article
Publication date: 20 January 2012

Pi‐Chuan Sun, Hsu‐Ping Chen and Kuang‐cheng Wang

The purpose of this paper is to explore the impacts of product harm, consumers' product knowledge and firms' negative information disclosure on ethical evaluation of a…

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1647

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the impacts of product harm, consumers' product knowledge and firms' negative information disclosure on ethical evaluation of a firm, especially, the moderating effects of product knowledge and negative information disclosure.

Design/methodology/approach

A 3×2×2 between‐subject design with three levels of product harm, two levels of product knowledge, and two treatments of negative information was used in this study. The experimental product is diet food.

Findings

The findings reveal that the level of product harm affects consumers' ethical evaluation. Furthermore, the individual's ethical evaluation will influence his or her purchase intention. The main effect of subjective knowledge is significant while its moderating effect is not significant. It is also found that the negative information disclosure will lower consumer's ethical evaluation of a firm, and the effect of product harm on ethical evaluation will be stronger for harmful products than for harmless products when the negative information is disclosed.

Practical implications

Marketers might need to be especially responsive if their practices result in a diminished reputation for their firms and lost sales. Exploiting the vulnerability of consumers or worsening their situation by marketing harmful products might be evaluated as unethical under principles of justice. It is suggested that marketers include increased disclosures of actual product harm levels relative to industry norms.

Originality/value

Consumers' product knowledge and firms' negative information disclosure are integrated into the model, exploring the effect of product harm on consumer's ethical evaluation of a firm and their moderating effects are discussed.

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Article
Publication date: 28 November 2018

Weiling Ye, Rong Huang and Zijing Zhang

Commodity display is an important cue for consumers’ prediction of the goods they purchase. Then why does a neat display (compared to a messy one) usually result in better…

Abstract

Purpose

Commodity display is an important cue for consumers’ prediction of the goods they purchase. Then why does a neat display (compared to a messy one) usually result in better product evaluation? This paper aims to discuss this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

By conducting three lab experiments, the authors proved the existence of “the pictorial effect.” In Study 1, the authors used Chinese knots as the material. Chinese knots are commonly used in decoration; therefore, their appearance is of high importance. The authors set a scenario of purchasing Chinese knots to dismantle for teaching how to knot, thus manipulating the importance of appearance into lower condition. The authors measured subjects’ attitude to display picture and product quality evaluation and examine the existence of “the pictorial effect.” In Study 2, the authors changed material to a functional product in daily life – playing cards. The authors used different usage scenarios to manipulate the importance of the playing cards’ appearance (high vs low). For the low importance group, the scenario is playing poker in a dormitory at the weekend; for the high importance group, the scenario is using playing cards to make a hat for a party. The authors add measurements of consumers’ perception of the popularity of product. Study 2 consolidates the conclusion of Study 1 and excludes the popularity inference effect. In Study 3, the authors used a comb as the material, thus manipulating the importance of product appearance through the different instructions on the comb’s packaging (focus on healthy function vs focus on hair appearance enhancement). Study 3 repeated the conclusion in Study 1 and Study 2, and proved the existence of a “display pictorial effect” by showing the main effect, mediation and moderating effect as well.

Findings

Current research brings forward the existence and conditions of “the pictorial effect,” i.e. when the goods are neatly displayed (relative to messily), the consumer’s attitude toward the display becomes more positive, hence leading to a higher product evaluation, and the consumer’s attitudes toward the display fully mediate “the pictorial effect”. However, “the pictorial effect” does not always occur; for the importance of the product, appearance plays a moderator role in the effect. If the consumer thinks the product appearance is not important, “the pictorial effect” could not be observed, which means there is no difference in product evaluation between messy and neat display of the commodity, and only when the product appearance is important, does the pictorial effect occur.

Research limitations/implications

The authors have noticed that display is part of the retail environment; therefore, research on how an environment affects human behavior may be valuable to reference. For example, for the experiment designs, especially Study 2, the authors asked participants to imagine making a hat using playing cards, which is a very creative task. In this task, participants may pay attention to creativity, and this may have an effect on product evaluation. According to Vohs et al., orderly environments lead people toward tradition and convention, whereas disorderly environments encourage breaking with tradition and convention – and that both settings can alter preferences, choice, and behavior. Messy displays may favor the product evaluation of some creative products when the situation requires higher creativity. The authors will attempt to test the effect of this factor in future study.

Practical implications

In application, current research supports “the necessity of tally” in the site management of retailing, and further answers the question as to what kind of products need more effort to be kept in a good order in their displays.

Originality/value

For the first time, the authors put forward “the pictorial effect” in product displays. The research provides insight to the underlying process through which merchandise displays can put an effect on the product evaluation, and supplements the contamination theory and popularity theory, thus contributing to the research works on merchandise displays.

Details

Journal of Contemporary Marketing Science, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2516-7480

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Article
Publication date: 17 August 2021

Hongjoo Woo and Sanghee Kim

The purpose of this study is to examine the effects of brand and message framing on consumers’ evaluations and purchase intentions of smart health-care clothing. The study…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the effects of brand and message framing on consumers’ evaluations and purchase intentions of smart health-care clothing. The study also examines the mediating effect of consumers’ evaluations on the effects of the brand and message framing on purchase intentions.

Design/methodology/approach

Through an experimental approach, a total of 240 US consumers’ evaluation of smart health-care clothing is compared according to the existence of a well-known brand (vs. none) and message framing (technology-focused vs. fashion-focused).

Findings

The results show that consumer evaluation of smart health-care clothing is higher when the product is from a well-known brand, where consumers’ fashion consciousness and health consciousness positively influence such an evaluation as covariates. Message framing, however, did not have an influence that revealed any significant difference between technology-focused and fashion-focused messages. The consumer’s evaluation of smart health-care clothing eventually increased their purchase intentions and mediated the effects of brand on purchase intentions.

Originality/value

Smart health-care clothing refers to clothing that measures, records and manages the user’s activity and health status through conductive fibers or sensors that are woven in the clothes. Despite its benefits, smart health-care clothing is still not widely adopted among consumers, except for a few successful examples. Closing this gap, the results of this study provide implications regarding whether and how brand and message framing maximize consumers’ evaluations toward smart health-care clothing, which the developers and marketers of such products can use to increase the product’s market penetration.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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Article
Publication date: 27 August 2021

Xiaoyu Wang and Chenhong Ding

Country of origin (COO) effect refers to the influence of COO on consumers' perception and evaluation of a product. This research explores the impact of consumers' power…

Abstract

Purpose

Country of origin (COO) effect refers to the influence of COO on consumers' perception and evaluation of a product. This research explores the impact of consumers' power distance on COO effect.

Design/methodology/approach

We conducted two experiments to test the relevant hypotheses.

Findings

The results indicate that power distance has a polarizing influence on COO effect. That means, for products from countries with good images, the higher the consumers' power distance, the better their evaluation of the products; while for products from countries with poor images, the higher the power distance, the worse their evaluation of the products. The research also finds the moderating effect of consumers' competence–related country-related affect (CRA). When holding positive competence–related CRA, for products from countries with good images, the higher the consumers' power distance, the better their evaluation of the products; for products from countries with poor images, consumers' power distance has no effect. When having negative competence–related CRA, for products from countries with poor images, the higher the consumers' power distance, the worse their evaluation of the products; for products from countries with good images, power distance has no effect.

Originality/value

This study finds that depending on the perception of COO image, power distance not only improves the evaluation of products but also lows such evaluation, reflecting a two-way polarizing feature.

Details

Journal of Contemporary Marketing Science, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2516-7480

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Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2006

Gina L. Miller, Naresh K. Malhotra and Tracey M. King

Abstract

Details

Review of Marketing Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7656-1305-9

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Article
Publication date: 24 August 2020

Kunter Gunasti, Selcan Kara and William T. Ross, Jr

This research aims to examine how credence, search and experience attributes compete with suggestive brand names that are incongruent with the attributes they cue (e.g…

Abstract

Purpose

This research aims to examine how credence, search and experience attributes compete with suggestive brand names that are incongruent with the attributes they cue (e.g. expensive EconoLodge Motel, short-lasting Duracell battery and joint-stiffening JointFlex pill).

Design/methodology/approach

This study relies on experimental studies, together with analyses of variance, t-tests and logistic regressions.

Findings

Incongruent suggestive brand names can distort product evaluations and alter perceptions of product performance in joint product judgments involving contradictory credence attributes; they can misdirect product evaluations even if the search attributes conflict with competitor brands. Furthermore, they are more likely to backfire if contradictory experience attributes are readily available to consumers.

Research limitations/implications

This test of the role of incongruence between suggestive brand names and actual product features includes key concepts that can inform continued studies, such as search attributes that consumers can readily observe, experience attributes that can be observed only after product use and credence attributes that might not be observed even after use.

Practical implications

This study provides applicable guidelines for managers, consumers and policymakers.

Originality/value

The findings expand beyond prior literature that focuses on memory-based, separate evaluations of advertised benefits and inferences or expectations of unavailable attributes. Specifically, this study details the implications of congruence between the suggestive brand names and different types of attributes observable at different consumption stages.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 54 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 22 February 2008

Sadrudin A. Ahmed and Alain d'Astous

The purpose of this paper is to provide an in‐depth examination of country‐of‐origin (COO) perceptions of consumers in a multinational setting. It shows how explanatory…

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6108

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide an in‐depth examination of country‐of‐origin (COO) perceptions of consumers in a multinational setting. It shows how explanatory factors like demographics, familiarity with a country's products, purchase behaviour and psychological variables jointly work to explain consumers' COO perceptions.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a quantitative study using a drop‐off and pick‐up survey among three samples of consumers in Canada, Morocco and Taiwan. The final sample size was comprised of 506 male consumers. The data were analyzed using factor analysis to group countries of origin and analyses of variance to relate COO perceptions to the explanatory variables.

Findings

The familiarity with products made in a country was the strongest predictor of country perceptions, followed by nationality and the manufacturing process and product complexity dimensions of country evaluation. Canadians had the highest propensity to distinguish between countries of origin on the basis of product technological complexity and manufacturing dimensions and Moroccans the least. Taiwanese appeared to show animosity towards China.

Research limitations/implications

The study used an only‐male sample from a limited number of countries. Future research should seek to develop a multi‐dimensional scale for the familiarity construct. They should also explore the concept of consumer capacity to distinguish between COOs. Cross‐national studies using cognitive style scales should be carried out. A qualitative examination of Taiwanese's COO perceptions is also recommended.

Practical implications

It seems important to increase consumers' familiarity with a COO and its products to improve its overall perception. Products made in Latin American countries have the lowest level of familiarity in general. Thus, increasing familiarity with their products is particularly important to achieve export success.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the marketing and international business literatures and provides insights to international marketers by bringing valuable information that can help make decisions as to where to manufacture and how to promote global products. It provides guidance as to what types of nations are likely to require multi‐dimensional information about countries of origin.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

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Article
Publication date: 11 May 2015

Aihwa Chang and Timmy H. Tseng

This study aims to investigate the interaction between branding strategies, levels of perceived fit and consumer innovativeness on the evaluation of new products from the…

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2149

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the interaction between branding strategies, levels of perceived fit and consumer innovativeness on the evaluation of new products from the perspective of situational strength.

Design/methodology/approach

Two experiments were conducted to empirically test the hypotheses.

Findings

A significant three-way interaction of branding strategy, perceived fit and consumer innovativeness on the evaluation of the new products was found. A significant two-way interaction of branding strategy and perceived fit was also found. Situational clarity fully mediates the relationship between branding strategy and consumer product evaluations at various fit levels.

Practical implications

The theory of situational strength may shed light on the selection of target market when managers launch new products. Innovative consumers are the target market for the new products under new branding or low fit sub-branding; under brand extension or high fit sub-branding, consumers are the target for the new products regardless of their degree of innovativeness.

Originality/value

This is the first work to apply situational strength theory to a new product evaluation context. The theory provides a unified framework for explaining the cognitive processes involved when consumers use and combine marketing cues (i.e. branding strategies and fit levels) to evaluate new products; it also facilitates evaluating how the effects of consumer innovativeness are accentuated or attenuated based on various combinations of marketing cues. Most research on the evaluation of new products has examined the influence of consumer innovativeness, perceived fit or branding strategies as distinct entities. This study simultaneously examined the three.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 49 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

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