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Article
Publication date: 5 December 2022

Christopher Hajek

This study explores aspects of entrepreneurial social identity that are made salient in communication, and that are related to positive group distinctiveness.

Abstract

Purpose

This study explores aspects of entrepreneurial social identity that are made salient in communication, and that are related to positive group distinctiveness.

Design/methodology/approach

The study employs a thematic analysis methodology, and the analysis is sensitized by social identity theory and related concepts. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 43 entrepreneurs in several US cities. The women and men discussed the nature of their entrepreneurial identities, and the relationship of past intra- and intergroup conversations to their realizations of a positively-distinct entrepreneurial identity. Open and axial coding of the entrepreneurs' verbal conversational content was conducted.

Findings

The analyses revealed four themes (and nine accompanying sub-themes) that represented dimensions of entrepreneurial social identity that were related to positive group distinctiveness.

Practical implications

Findings may prove useful for mutual understanding among current and aspiring entrepreneurs, and for educators and managers with an interest in encouraging entrepreneurial mindsets through training program development.

Originality/value

This study is unique not only in its adoption of an intergroup comparison approach to entrepreneurship that integrates recalled past communication, but also in its focus on positive in-group distinctiveness. The desire for this psychological state may be one motivating force guiding the content of entrepreneurial identity, and it may, for some individuals, be one factor that drives the pursuit of entrepreneurship itself. This study offers themes that break new ground in illuminating dimensions derived from recalled conversational content that entrepreneurs considered key to positive identity salience.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 December 2022

Nadezhda Ryapolova, Jerome T. Galea and Karah Y. Greene

In a collective effort to build a patient-centered and coordinated health care system, social workers and psychologists are being progressively introduced to primary…

Abstract

Purpose

In a collective effort to build a patient-centered and coordinated health care system, social workers and psychologists are being progressively introduced to primary health care (PHC) settings worldwide. The present study aims to explore the current status of integration through the narrative of social workers and psychologists in PHC settings in Kazakhstan.

Design/methodology/approach

In this paper purposive snowball sampling was utilized to recruit social workers and psychologists who work, or used to work, in PHC settings since the onset of integration in Nur-Sultan for participation in an in-depth interview. A semistructured interview guide was based on normalization process theory (NPT). Interviews were conducted via video conference, in Russian language, lasted no more than 50 min, and transcribed verbatim. Cross-case analysis of eight cases was performed using NPT constructs.

Findings

Cross-case analysis included findings from the interviews from five social workers and three psychologists. Four major constructs of implementation process from NPT were reflected in the findings: coherence (believes integration improves patient care, functions within integrated care), cognitive participation (individual changes to role performance, mechanisms of work), collective action (status of support from stakeholders, cooperation within a multidisciplinary team) and reflective monitoring (existing mechanisms for monitoring the integration).

Research limitations/implications

Despite organizational integration, there is a lack of successful clinical integration of social workers and psychologists in PHC settings of Kazakhstan, which is manifested by a lack of understanding of responsibilities and functions of these mental health care specialists. Consensus was reached by all participants that both social workers and psychologists are valuable assets in a multidisciplinary team.

Originality/value

The present study contributes to the current knowledge of integrated PHC service delivery by addressing the status of integrated care in Kazakhstan from interviews with key stakeholders in social work and mental health. Moving forward, improvements are needed to (1) establish the monitoring mechanism to evaluate the status of integration, (2) enhance effective collaboration within multidisciplinary teams in PHC settings and (3) increase awareness among medical workers and community members on mental health issues and the available support offered by social workers and psychologists to promote quality of life in a holistic, integrated manner.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Creating Spaces for an Ageing Society
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-739-6

Book part
Publication date: 19 October 2020

Prisca Brosi and Marvin Schuth

Purpose – We aim to elucidate the influence of leaders' emotion expressions on the social distance between leaders and followers in face-to-face and digital communication.…

Abstract

Purpose – We aim to elucidate the influence of leaders' emotion expressions on the social distance between leaders and followers in face-to-face and digital communication.

Design/methodology/approach – Literature review

Findings – Following functional theories on emotions, leaders' expressions of socially engaging emotions (e.g., guilt, happiness, gratitude, and compassion) lower social distance. Leaders' expressions of socially disengaging emotions (e.g., anger, contempt, disgust, and pride) increase social distance. In digital communication, we propose that the effect of socially engaging and disengaging emotions depends on the social presence that is provided by the different digital communication media.

Practical implication – Based on our theoretical model, we derive implications for (1) leaders' use of face-to-face communication, (2) the importance of digital communication with high social presence, (3) leaders' use of digital communication as a tool for emotion regulation, and (4) coping strategies when communicating via digital means with low social presence.

Details

Emotions and Service in the Digital Age
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-260-2

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 15 February 2017

Matt Sleat

In this chapter I explore the issues of whose interest and rights are at stake when social scientists conduct their research. I caution that the ethical considerations…

Abstract

In this chapter I explore the issues of whose interest and rights are at stake when social scientists conduct their research. I caution that the ethical considerations, values and principles that pertain to the social sciences are not always the same as those which rightly underpin the biomedical sciences and so not all should be imported. In particular I consider the dangers of applying a ‘participant protection model’ to social science research. I suggest that the social sciences must be regulated through a framework that understands and enables these differences rather than misconstrues and hinders good social science research.

Details

Finding Common Ground: Consensus in Research Ethics Across the Social Sciences
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-130-8

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 23 August 2018

Helen May and Mark Jones

In recent years, there have been a growing number of references to social capital, in debates about higher education (HE), by policy makers, senior institutional leaders…

Abstract

In recent years, there have been a growing number of references to social capital, in debates about higher education (HE), by policy makers, senior institutional leaders and academics. This chapter highlights the value of social capital to both students and institutions alike, as a contributing factor to the transformational effect of HE; and as an important tool to explain the value of HE to policy makers and the public. We draw on empirical data from students articulating the value of social capital. Their voices demonstrate that social capital has a significant role to play in institutional endeavours to maximise student success.

Details

Access to Success and Social Mobility through Higher Education: A Curate's Egg?
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-836-1

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 14 October 2019

Kyungmi Kim

The purpose of this study is to introduce the concept of social tourism and to find existing social tourism practices in South Korea. Social tourism is generally supported…

Abstract

The purpose of this study is to introduce the concept of social tourism and to find existing social tourism practices in South Korea. Social tourism is generally supported by governments to provide tourism opportunities to those who are otherwise not able to trip. Social tourism helps both people who use the programs and the tourism industry. In South Korea, unlike many other countries, the practice of social tourism is based on businesses’ corporate social responsibility. Businesses offer various cultural and recreational opportunities to various groups of people in the community. This study outlines the context of various approaches to social tourism in South Korea and highlights some challenges and proposed initiatives for the future integration of the social tourism sector.

Book part
Publication date: 8 January 2021

Gonca Ongan and Agata Fortuna

Collecting data on social impact and using it in decision-making process in organisation in order to maximise the social value created for people unfortunately is not yet…

Abstract

Collecting data on social impact and using it in decision-making process in organisation in order to maximise the social value created for people unfortunately is not yet the common practice among social impact actors in Turkey. While the importance of allocating the resources in the most impactful way grows due to the pressing need to tackle increasing social inequalities, the social impact management practices of organisations aiming to contribute to the solution and create positive social impact lag behind. The chapter presents the current approaches and practices on social impact measurement and management of social impact actors in Turkey based on experience of Koç University Social Impact Forum.

Details

Generation Impact
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-929-9

Keywords

Abstract

Details

The Centrality of Sociality
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80262-362-8

Book part
Publication date: 8 January 2021

Anne Lythgoe and Matthew Baqueriza-Jackson

Since the introduction of the Public Services (Social Value) Act 2012, there has been a common misconception that Social Value is inherently about Procurement. We think…

Abstract

Since the introduction of the Public Services (Social Value) Act 2012, there has been a common misconception that Social Value is inherently about Procurement. We think that the process of Procurement is a means through which questions can be asked around Social Value commitments; however, Social Value should come into dialogue way before a tender exercise. It must be at the forefront of political visioning, strategy development, officer behaviour and the design of goods and services. In this chapter, we explore how Public Authorities and other Anchor Institutions can embed Social Value into everything they do, utilising Commissioning and Procurement as the basis.

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