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Article
Publication date: 11 October 2021

Kimberly W. O'Connor, Kimberly S. McDonald, Brandon T. McDaniel and Gordon B. Schmidt

The purpose of this exploratory study is to examine individual perceptions about the impact that social media use has on career satisfaction and perceived career benefits…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this exploratory study is to examine individual perceptions about the impact that social media use has on career satisfaction and perceived career benefits. We examined whether informal online learning through “typical” types of social media behaviors (e.g. liking a post or messaging another user) and “networking” types of social media behaviors (e.g. endorsing another user, writing recommendations, going “live,” or looking for a job) impacted career-related perceptions.

Design/methodology/approach

In this study, we analyzed Amazon Mechanical Turk survey data gathered from adult participants (n = 475). We focused our inquiry specifically on two social media sites, Facebook and LinkedIn. We asked participants about their social media use and behaviors, as well as their perceptions of career satisfaction and career benefits related to social media.

Findings

We found that both typical and networking types of social media behaviors positively predicted the “knowing whom” career competency (defined as career relevant networks and contacts that individuals use to develop their careers) and career satisfaction. Only networking behaviors were positively associated with perceived career benefits of social media use. We further found that LinkedIn users’ career satisfaction was lower compared to non-LinkedIn users.

Originality/value

This study adds to the small, but growing body of career research focusing on social capital and social media. Our results suggest that informal online learning via social media may have a positive impact on employees’ career-related perceptions.

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 7 October 2021

This paper aims to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting-edge research and case studies.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting-edge research and case studies.

Design/methodology/approach

This briefing is prepared by an independent writer who adds their own impartial comments and places the articles in context.

Findings

This research paper examines coopetition strategies for social enterprises. The study's coopetition framework consists of four strategic stages: (1) a social incubator inducing coopetition between social enterprises; (2) coopetition boosting market performance; (3) coopetition emerging naturally from social enterprises' activities; and (4) a coopetition framework for social entrepreneurship being formed. These strategies demonstrate that social enterprises want to increasingly cooperate, but also have to compete with each other for volunteers and to make their products stand out. Ultimately, this balanced coopetition is what maximizes the social value that these enterprises supply to communities.

Originality/value

The briefing saves busy executives, strategists and researchers hours of reading time by selecting only the very best, most pertinent information and presenting it in a condensed and easy-to-digest format.

Details

Strategic Direction, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0258-0543

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Article
Publication date: 14 September 2021

Susan Erickson, Kerry A. Dunne and Christopher C. Martell

This article presents the social studies practices continuum, which is a tool that supports social studies teachers in implementing inquiry-based practices in their…

Abstract

Purpose

This article presents the social studies practices continuum, which is a tool that supports social studies teachers in implementing inquiry-based practices in their classrooms. It was designed by the authors based on similar instruments found in science education and informed by the College, Career, and Civic Life (C3) Framework for Social Studies Standards.

Design/methodology/approach

The article describes the instrument's creation and describes its use with preservice teachers in teacher preparation programs, inservice teachers during district-based professional development.

Findings

The continuum has been used as a reflective tool for teachers and curriculum developers, and as a tool for instructional coaches and administrators to improve teaching practices.

Originality/value

This article offers a new tool for teachers and supervisors to use in improving instruction.

Details

Social Studies Research and Practice, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1933-5415

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 14 October 2021

Pieter Breek, Jasper Eshuis and Joke Hermes

Social media have become a key part of placemaking. Placemaking revolves around collaboration between multiple stakeholders, which requires ongoing two-way communication…

Abstract

Purpose

Social media have become a key part of placemaking. Placemaking revolves around collaboration between multiple stakeholders, which requires ongoing two-way communication between local government and citizens. Although social media offer promising tools for local governments and public professionals in placemaking, they have not lived up to their potential. This paper aims to uncover the tensions and challenges that social media bring for public professionals at the street level in placemaking processes.

Design/methodology/approach

This study aims to fill this gap with a case study of area brokers engaged in online placemaking in Amsterdam. In total, 14 in-depth semi-structured interviews were conducted, focusing on area brokers’ social media practices, perceptions and challenges. The authors used an open coding strategy in the first phase of coding. In the second phase, the authors regrouped codes in thematic categories with the use of sensitizing concepts derived from the theoretical review.

Findings

The use of social media for placemaking imposes demands on area brokers from three sides: the bureaucracy, the affordances of social media and affective publics. The paper unpacks pressures area brokers are under and the (emotional) labour they carry out to align policy and bureaucratic requirements with adequate communication needed in neighbourhood affairs on social media. The tensions and the multidimensionality of what is required explain the reluctance of area brokers to exploit the potential of social media in their work.

Originality/value

Several studies have addressed the use of social media in placemaking, but all neglected the perspective of street-level bureaucrats who shape the placemaking process in direct contact with citizens.

Details

Journal of Place Management and Development, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8335

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 24 October 2021

Koninika Mukherjee and Dilwar Hussain

Due to ongoing significant life changes during the transition into higher education, social anxiety can be problematic, especially for college students. It has adverse…

Abstract

Purpose

Due to ongoing significant life changes during the transition into higher education, social anxiety can be problematic, especially for college students. It has adverse effects on various aspects of one’s life, including one’s feelings and emotions. The study investigated the interplay between social anxiety and emotions and its impact on affect. The aim of this study is to examine the role of difficulties in emotion regulation in the relationship between social anxiety and change in affect.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a longitudinal study. Data was collected with self-report instruments at two time points with a gap of four months. Participants were Indian undergraduate students from a technical institute.

Findings

The result revealed that high social anxiety in tandem with difficulties engaging in goal-directed behavior significantly impacts changes in positive affect. However, this effect was significant only in the presence of depression.

Research limitations/implications

This study highlights the harmful impact of comorbid issues such as depression in socially anxious individuals. The present study might have implications for educators and clinicians working with college students.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the only study to test the proposed research model in a sample of Indian college students. The use of a moderated moderation analysis with the three regulation strategies and depression also adds to the uniqueness of this study.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

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Article
Publication date: 6 October 2021

Arpita Khare, Amrut Sadachar and Swagata Chakraborty

The study examined the role of collective self-esteem (CSE), online communities, green attitudes and the influence of celebrities on green clothing involvement and…

Abstract

Purpose

The study examined the role of collective self-esteem (CSE), online communities, green attitudes and the influence of celebrities on green clothing involvement and consequently its impact on green clothing purchase behavior of Indian consumers.

Design/methodology/approach

A mix of convenience and random sampling was used for data collection via an online survey. The sample (n = 403) comprised consumers having awareness about green clothing. Structural equation modeling (SEM) was used for analysis.

Findings

Online communities, green attitudes and influence of celebrities predicted green clothing involvement and in turn their purchase behavior. CSE had no impact on consumers' green clothing involvement.

Practical implications

The findings can help green apparel manufacturers and designers to use celebrities and online communities to educate and promote the benefits of green clothing. Social media can be employed to share experiences and engage consumers about green clothing.

Originality/value

Since online networking sites are gaining predominance in influencing behavior, the study extends the earlier research on social influence by examining its role along with celebrities and CSE on green apparel involvement and purchase. The study combines celebrities, online communities and collective identity influences (offline and online) in predicting green clothing purchase in India.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

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Article
Publication date: 25 October 2021

Paweł Mielcarz and Dmytro Osiichuk

This study aims to elucidate the role of social ties in facilitating the career progress of senior officers within public companies in an emerging market.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to elucidate the role of social ties in facilitating the career progress of senior officers within public companies in an emerging market.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors followed the career track of 2,151 senior officers serving on management and supervisory boards of Polish public companies. The authors used multivariate econometric modeling to investigate the factors shaping their career progress.

Findings

The authors document an increasing impact of officers’ social networks on the likelihood of assuming multiple consecutive senior positions. It takes progressively less time for incumbent senior officers to find a subsequent/concomitant board position with a network of social ties from prior workplaces facilitating career progress and prior experience being negatively associated with multiple positions. Officers’ social ties at the senior level are also shown to be positively associated with total compensation and with the likelihood of cross-industry career transition in both executive and supervisory roles.

Originality/value

Social network appears to play a more salient role in accelerating careers of supervisory board members even though executives also benefit therefrom. Finally, the network of social ties with former or incumbent supervisory board members exercises a more pronounced positive impact on career progress than ties with former or incumbent executives.

Details

Corporate Governance: The International Journal of Business in Society, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-0701

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Article
Publication date: 15 October 2021

Petru Dorin Micu and Christy Ashley

The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether consumers experience territory infringements during interactions with other consumers on firm-managed social media…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether consumers experience territory infringements during interactions with other consumers on firm-managed social media pages and, if so, how consumers respond. In offline contexts, feelings of territoriality affect consumers’ responses to other people in ways that are detrimental to the firm. Less is known about the effects of territoriality in response to consumer-to-consumer interactions on social media. Firms need to understand the implications of these interactions as they encourage consumer engagement on firm-owned social media pages.

Design/methodology/approach

The current research examines whether territorial consumer behaviors occur in response to co-consumers on social media pages for a brand (Study 1) and a product (Study 2) using experimental studies.

Findings

The studies provide evidence that a perceived territory infringement by a co-consumer can provoke retaliation toward the co-consumer and reduce engagement on the firm-owned social media page. Psychological ownership toward the product or brand amplifies these effects.

Research limitations/implications

The findings were robust in the experimental scenarios that featured a brand and a product. However, future research should validate the results in a field study and include other brands and products.

Practical implications

The findings highlight conditions under which consumer-to-consumer interactions can decrease social media engagement on firm-owned social media pages.

Originality/value

The manuscript is the first to examine how territoriality and psychological ownership relate to negative consumer responses following consumer-to-consumer interactions on social media.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 19 October 2021

Nadia Ben Farhat Toumi, Rim Khemiri and Yosra Fourati Makni

The aim of this paper is to examine the impact of directors' home regions on corporate social responsibility (CSR) disclosure. Specifically, the authors aim to determine…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to examine the impact of directors' home regions on corporate social responsibility (CSR) disclosure. Specifically, the authors aim to determine whether Anglo-American, European, French, other European and other regional directors' presence affects CSR disclosure differently.

Design/methodology/approach

This empirical study uses panel data analysis of all listed firms on the SBF 120 from 2008 to 2019. The environmental, social and governance (ESG) scores are collected from the Bloomberg database and indicate the extent of CSR information disclosure by French companies. The paper is based on a dynamic generalized method of moments panel estimator that makes it possible to control for unobservable heterogeneity and endogeneity and reduces estimation bias.

Findings

The findings of this study provide evidence that home region diversity and the presence of Anglo-Americans on a board are positively and significantly associated with ESG disclosure and environmental disclosure, whereas they are negatively associated with social and governance disclosure. Surprisingly, when directors come from European countries, they disclose less ESG and environmental information. Nevertheless, when only French directors are present, the company tends to divulge all dimensions of CSR. Indeed, while there is a significant positive influence of French directors on ESG disclosure, the presence of other European directors displays negative and statistically significant regression coefficients.

Research limitations/implications

This study may be interesting the French policy makers who can now pay more appropriate attention to directors' nationality or region. Thus, firms should identify the foreign directors who can support their strategy with relevant experience in terms of CSR. This could help to change the opinion of some companies that consider the internalization of the board as a constraint rather than an opportunity. These results will be useful for French-listed companies in setting the criteria for the appointment of foreign directors. It may be interesting to recruit directors across European boundaries.

Practical implications

This paper attempts to provide a better understanding of the effects of the home regions of directors on CSR disclosure in order to enlighten corporate managers whose companies operate in different cultures given that they have to deal with this aspect. In this international business environment, CEOs should increasingly consider the international CSR experience of directors to be a resource. In addition, this study may be of relevance to French market authorities, which constantly encourage firms to diversify the profiles of directors on their boards and recruit more international members.

Originality/value

This study is the first to evince that the disclosure of each CSR disclosure score differs depending on the directors' home regions. Unlike previous studies, the authors focused simultaneously on the resource-based view (RBV) and institutional theory.

Details

Journal of Applied Accounting Research, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-5426

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 18 October 2021

Lorena del Carmen Alvarez-Castañon and Maricruz Romero-Ugalde

This paper aims to analyse the university experience of a social laboratory that mixes science and art to instruct communities of sustainability practice in heterogeneous…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to analyse the university experience of a social laboratory that mixes science and art to instruct communities of sustainability practice in heterogeneous contexts through interpretive audio-visual ethnography and cinematographic language.

Design/methodology/approach

The research approach was qualitative; data were triangulated through the thorough revision of the literature reported on this praxis, the auto-ethnography of the founder and CEO of this social laboratory and the systematization of the training categories from their documentaries. Furthermore, the analysis of this laboratory as a social innovation considered five categories, namely, critical interaction, shared values, social responsibility, digital competences and sustainability practices, and the projects profile was contrasted with the Sustainable Development Goals to show its sustainable approach.

Findings

The results showed that the best scored sustainability university communities are interdisciplinary. Moreover, the mix of science and art to train practice communities is a social innovation model that can go beyond university walls to influence its environment in dissimilar and socially disadvantaged territories.

Research limitations/implications

This research is based on a case from a Mexican university in a specific cultural context. Although the conclusions cannot be generalized, this case contributes to the need for pertinent complementarity between various classical methodological possibilities which, when articulated, enhance the research work.

Practical implications

The results could have practical implications if these are used as inputs in the development of university programmes with an interdisciplinary approach to sustainability training.

Originality/value

This research proposes this experience as an attempt to understand how to promote sustainable education among university communities that influence territories with wide social gaps.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

Keywords

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