Search results

1 – 10 of over 23000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Yan Pan, Yufan Shang and Richards Malika

The authors explain the conditions under which positive personality traits and work environment factors either interact synergistically or yield diminishing-gains when…

Abstract

Purpose

The authors explain the conditions under which positive personality traits and work environment factors either interact synergistically or yield diminishing-gains when creative individuals are in a supportive working environment.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were obtained using a time-lagged design. The final sample includes 350 researchers from 64 scientific research teams.

Findings

The results indicate that the need for cognition is positively associated with individual creativity. Furthermore, this study suggests that perceived organizational support for creativity can complement an individual's need for cognition when it comes to individual creativity. This indicates a synergistic pattern. On the other hand, psychological safety can substitute for an individual's need for cognition when influencing individual creativity. Thus, a diminishing-gains pattern also exists.

Practical implications

The results suggest that when individuals are stuck in environments of low psychological safety, yet perceive higher levels of organizational support for creativity, their levels of creativity can be boosted.

Originality/value

This study is among one of the first to explore a supportive context's complementary or substitution effect on positive personality traits by demonstrating the complementary effect of perceived organizational support for creativity and the substitution effect of psychological safety. This study validates the positive effect of the need for cognition on creativity. This study also enriches the psychological safety literature by showing that psychological safety is not always necessary for individuals with a high need for cognition.

Details

Management Decision, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part

Caroline O. Ford and William R. Pasewark

We conduct an experiment to analyze the impact of a well-established psychological construct, need for cognition, in an audit-related decision context. By simulating a…

Abstract

We conduct an experiment to analyze the impact of a well-established psychological construct, need for cognition, in an audit-related decision context. By simulating a basic audit sampling task, we determine whether the desire to engage in a cognitive process influences decisions made during that task. Specifically, we investigate whether an individual's need for cognition influences the quantity of data collected, the revision of a predetermined sampling plan, and the time taken to make a decision. Additionally, we examine the impact of cost constraints during the decision-making process.

Contrary to results in previous studies, we find those with a higher need for cognition sought less data than those with a lower need for cognition to make an audit sampling decision. In addition, we find that the need for cognition had no relationship to sampling plan revisions or the time needed to make an audit sampling decision. Previous studies regarding the need for cognition did not utilize incremental costs for additional decision-making information. Potentially, these costs provided cognitive challenges that influenced decision outcomes.

Details

Advances in Accounting Behavioral Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-758-1

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Muhammad Mustafa Raziq, Qazi Mohammed Ahmed, Mansoor Ahmad, Saquib Yusaf, Aymen Sajjad and Salman Waheed

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship of advertising skepticism and need for cognition with consumers’ attitudes toward brand. There is currently…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship of advertising skepticism and need for cognition with consumers’ attitudes toward brand. There is currently limited understanding on how advertising skepticism and need for cognition relate to the consumers’ attitudes.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a “within-brand-comparison” strategy, a mock print advertisement of a telecom brand is shown to 204 cellular services users in Pakistan. This is followed by a survey. Data are analyzed using a variance-based structural equation modeling.

Findings

The relationship of advertising skepticism with attitude toward brand is negative and partially mediated by the sequence of brand image, advertisement believability and attitudes toward advertisement. In contrast, the relationship between need for cognition and attitude toward brand is positive and fully mediated by the sequence of brand image, advertisement believability and attitudes toward advertisement.

Originality/value

The paper fills some theoretical as well as empirical gaps by showing how (in a within-brand comparative advertisement context) advertising skepticism and need for cognition relate to the consumers’ attitudes toward brand.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 36 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Liviu Florea, Sorin Valcea, Maria Riaz Hamdani and Thomas W. Dougherty

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how individual interviewers’ dispositional cognitive motivations may influence interview interactions and outcomes. More…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how individual interviewers’ dispositional cognitive motivations may influence interview interactions and outcomes. More specifically, this study explores the influence of the need for cognition, need for cognitive closure, and accountability on the relationship between first impressions and selection decisions.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 41 graduate students were assigned the role of interviewers and were tasked to interview 331 undergraduate students at a large Midwestern university. The selection interview was designed to recruit qualified undergraduate students to the MBA program of the university.

Findings

First impressions significantly influenced selection decisions, but did not influence interviewers’ behaviors. Moreover, multilevel analyses reveal that interviewers’ need for cognition and accountability moderate the relationship between first impression and selection decisions, albeit in different direction. Need for cognition strengthens, whereas accountability weakens the relationship between first impression and selection decision.

Research limitations/implications

A potential interviewer bias is apparent, where interviewers high on need for cognition tend to weight first impressions more in the decision process. However, this bias was not directly observable, since interviewers’ behaviors during the interview were not affected by first impressions.

Originality/value

The present study goes beyond previous research on first impressions in the employment interview, finding that dispositional differences account for the tendency to weigh first impressions in the selection decision.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 48 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Ruoh‐Nan Yan, Jennifer Yurchisin and Kittichai Watchravesringkan

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effect of apparel care label information presentation formats (i.e. symbols only, text only, and the combination) and the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effect of apparel care label information presentation formats (i.e. symbols only, text only, and the combination) and the individual trait of need for cognition on consumers' confidence in and risk perceptions about the post‐purchase activity of care of apparel items.

Design/methodology/approach

A scenario‐based experiment was conducted using a convenience sample of 275 undergraduate students for data collection. MANCOVA was conducted to test the hypotheses.

Findings

The findings of this research suggest not only that the text only format and the combination of text and symbols format are preferred to the symbols only format but also that the text only format was the most preferred among the three formats. Both the text only format and the combination format significantly increased consumers' confidence in and reduced consumers' risk perceptions about their care of apparel items.

Practical implications

The symbols only label does reduce apparel manufacturers' costs. However, because consumers may use care label information as a decision criterion for purchasing apparel items, industry practitioners need to also pay attention to the impact of end consumers' perceptions of these labels on their purchase decisions.

Originality/value

Examination of three different information presentation formats (symbols only, text only, and the combination of symbols and text) adds to the extant literature focusing on mainly two levels of formats (i.e. visual vs verbal).

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Rami Paasovaara and Harri T. Luomala

This paper aims to investigate how differences in message content and in need for cognition influence consumers' sensory evaluation, product attitudes and purchase…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate how differences in message content and in need for cognition influence consumers' sensory evaluation, product attitudes and purchase intentions in terms of spelt porridge and sea buckthorn juice.

Design/methodology/approach

Quantitative research methods were used. Four taste experiments were carried out among Finnish female consumers (n=129).

Findings

Health‐related product information had a positive impact on attitude towards and intention to purchase spelt porridge, and safety‐related product information had a positive impact on sensory experience of sea buckthorn juice. In addition, in the examination of the need for cognition effects revealed a tendency indicating that spelt porridge and sea buckthorn juice were experienced more positively among individuals high in need for cognition than among individuals low in need for cognition.

Research limitations/implications

The instrument of need for cognition is also applicable to investigating actual behavioural elements such as sensory evaluation.

Practical implications

This paper has implications for novel food marketing.

Originality/value

The findings advance understanding of the roles of subtle message differences and need for cognition in consumers' food product experiences.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 113 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Sreedhar Madhavaram, Vishag Badrinarayanan and Elad Granot

This paper aims to attempt to develop an integrative theoretical framework that approaches global industrial marketing from a managerial cognition perspective.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to attempt to develop an integrative theoretical framework that approaches global industrial marketing from a managerial cognition perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing from the managerial cognition research, business strategy research, and international business research, this paper develops a theoretical framework that is relevant to global industrial marketing.

Findings

Global industrial marketing research has much to gain from the managerial cognition literature. The framework developed in this article presents relevant managerial cognition variables, their individual and firm level antecedents, and desirable outcomes.

Research limitations/implications

The framework presented in this paper provides strong theoretical foundation for further theory development in global industrial marketing research and managerial cognition research. However, given the conceptual nature of our research, empirical scrutiny and further conceptual and empirical research are required.

Originality/value

Given the growing importance of global industrial marketing, the authors hope that this article provides a theoretical foundation for future research. For practitioners, the framework provides a useful starting point for evaluating managerial cognition in their firms and effective usage of the managerial cognition concept.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 26 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part

Joyce S. Osland, Michael Ehret and Lisa Ruiz

The rapidly growing body of global leadership literature still lacks research on both global change and global leader cognition. This chapter presents two case studies…

Abstract

The rapidly growing body of global leadership literature still lacks research on both global change and global leader cognition. This chapter presents two case studies describing large-scale global change efforts led by expert global leaders. This is complemented with the results of cognitive task analysis interviews with the two expert global leaders. The findings include task diagrams of the change process they employed and knowledge audits of the most difficult cognitive step in the change processes they led. The audit identifies the elements of expert cognition they utilized, the cues and strategies they employed, and the perceived difficulties novices would experience in similar situations. The findings confirm previous research, solidifying the role and nature of expert cognition in global leaders. We conclude with a discussion of the implications our analysis holds for research and practice.

Details

Advances in Global Leadership
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-698-3

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part

Jon J. Fallesen and Stanley M. Halpin

Pew and Mavor (1998) called for an integrative representation of human behavior for use in models of individual combatants and organizations. Models with integrated…

Abstract

Pew and Mavor (1998) called for an integrative representation of human behavior for use in models of individual combatants and organizations. Models with integrated representation of behavior have only been achieved at rudimentary levels according to those performing the studies (e.g. Pew & Mavor, 1998; Tulving, 2002) and those building the models (e.g. Warwick et al., 2002). This chapter will address aspects of cognitive performance that are important to incorporate into models of combat based on acceptance of theory, strength of empirical data, or for other reasons such as to bridge gaps where incomplete knowledge exists about cognitive behavior and performance. As a starting point, this chapter will assess which of Pew and Mavor’s recommendations are still appropriate as determined by a review of selected literature on cognition and its representation. We will also provide some review and extensions of key literature on cognition and modeling and suggest a way ahead to close the remaining gaps. Different aspects of cognition are described with recent findings, and most are followed by an example of how they have been represented in computer models or a discussion of challenges to their representation in modeling.

Details

The Science and Simulation of Human Performance
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-296-2

Content available
Article

Hung-Che Wu and Ching-Chan Cheng

The purpose of this paper is to explore the structural relationship between green persistence intentions and their seven drivers – green authenticity, green perceptual…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the structural relationship between green persistence intentions and their seven drivers – green authenticity, green perceptual evaluation, green co-creation, green experiential memorability, green experiential satisfaction, green passionate love and green need for cognition in a green hotel context.

Design/methodology/approach

The data used in this study were based on a sample of 589 customers staying at one green hotel in New Taipei City of Taiwan. The predicted relationship was tested using the structural equation modeling and the hierarchical regression analysis.

Findings

The results indicate that green perceptual evaluation, green co-creation and green experiential memorability influence green experiential satisfaction. Green passionate love is influenced by green experiential satisfaction. Green need for cognition moderates the effect of green experiential satisfaction on green persistence intentions. Green persistence intentions are influenced by green experiential satisfaction and green passionate love.

Practical implications

To increase green authenticity, green perceptual evaluation, green co-creation, green experiential memorability, green experiential satisfaction, green passionate love, green need for cognition and green persistence intentions, the study findings will help green hotels to develop and implement market-orientated product and/or service strategies.

Originality/value

This paper provides data that lead to a better understanding of the relationships among green authenticity, green perceptual evaluation, green co-creation, green experiential memorability, green experiential satisfaction, green passionate love, green need for cognition and green persistence intentions in a green hotel context.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 23000