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Article
Publication date: 7 June 2021

Kyung-Min Kim, Benjamin Nobi, Sangwon Lee and Chad Milewicz

This research investigates three major research questions. First, how does brand alliance type, defined by a partner's location and brand quality, affect consumers'…

Abstract

Purpose

This research investigates three major research questions. First, how does brand alliance type, defined by a partner's location and brand quality, affect consumers' emotional value perceptions of higher education brand alliances for dual-degree programs? Second, does perceived brand fit mediate the relationship between brand alliance type and emotional value perceptions? Third, do individual differences in world-mindedness moderate the influence of brand alliance type on emotional value perceptions?

Design/methodology/approach

In total, two experiments are performed. Experiment one examines the effect of brand alliance type, at varying combinations of partner brand quality and partner location (domestic or foreign), on consumers' emotional value perceptions. Experiment two examines the moderating role of world-mindedness in the relationship between brand alliance type and consumers' emotional value perceptions.

Findings

Results provide evidence that consumers' perception of brand fit mediates the relationship between brand alliance type and consumers' emotional value perceptions of the alliance. Results also indicate that world-mindedness moderates the relationship between brand alliance type and emotional value perceptions.

Originality/value

This research extends the previous literature on higher education dual-degree brand alliances and introduces world-mindedness as an important consumer-based characteristic to consider in this line of research. It answers calls for more research on higher education branding and calls for research into the potential mediating role and importance of brand fit. It provides several theoretical and managerial implications relevant to the higher education brand alliances, particularly in dual-degree programs.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

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Article
Publication date: 25 September 2019

Casey E. Newmeyer, Efua Obeng and John Hulland

Drawing on the brand alliance, cause marketing and corporate social responsibility literatures, the authors introduce the notion of international cause alliances. The…

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing on the brand alliance, cause marketing and corporate social responsibility literatures, the authors introduce the notion of international cause alliances. The authors conceptualize international cause alliances as strategic partnerships between international causes and for-profit companies with the stated purpose of raising funds for the cause. Beyond signaling that companies are socially responsible, international cause alliances may also help companies increase brand awareness or expand into new markets. Because international cause alliances take many forms and differ in the extent to which the brands are integrated, they have very different strategic implications. The purpose of this paper is to discuss these implications in a framework as well as providing managerial direction for both for-profit companies and causes when forming such alliances.

Design/methodology/approach

Using literature on brand alliances, cause marketing, and corporate social responsibility as a foundation, the authors introduce the notion of international cause alliances. The authors review literature to understand the many forms of alliances and investigate the extent to which brands are integrated. The authors then use these implications to develop a framework that can guide managerial decision-making for both for-profit companies and causes when forming such alliances.

Findings

The research suggests that to effectively develop international cause alliances, the organization involved must be aware of the challenges and potential benefits that these partnerships produce. For instance, while highly integrated alliances involve large resource commitments they also facilitate brand image spillover. As such, these alliances are a great way for companies to alter customers’ perceptions of their brands. Alternatively, low integration alliances require fewer resources and facilitate market expansion.

Research limitations/implications

This research identifies strategies that companies and causes can use to either expand their markets or alter customers’ perceptions of their brands.

Originality/value

This paper presents a framework that companies and causes can use when forming international cause alliances.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 37 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

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Article
Publication date: 31 January 2020

Casey E. Newmeyer and Julie A. Ruth

Marketing managers have strategic choices when forming brand alliances. One such choice is integration, defined as the extent to which the offering is a fusion in the form…

Abstract

Purpose

Marketing managers have strategic choices when forming brand alliances. One such choice is integration, defined as the extent to which the offering is a fusion in the form and function of the partner brands. The paper aims to investigate how integration affects consumer attribution of responsibility to brand alliance partners.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper builds on the previous study on brand alliances and attribution theory. Multiple experiments are used to test three hypotheses.

Findings

This research shows that consumers are sensitive to the level of alliance integration, which, in turn, affects attributions of responsibility for the joint offering. Consistent with attribution theory, results show that responsibility for each brand varies systematically by integration and lead brand status vis-à-vis the alliance: while consumers perceive both brands as equally responsible for higher integration brand alliances, responsibility attributions diverge in lower integration alliances based on whether the brand is the alliance host. This pattern also holds for product-harm events.

Research limitations/implications

It is important to explore brand alliance characteristics and to date, the level of integration between the partners has not been considered from a consumer standpoint. Consumers are sensitive to the level of partner brand integration and this perception influences perceptions of responsibility.

Practical implications

Managers should be aware that the level of brand alliance integration and lead brand status lead to different attributions of responsibility, which is strategically important, as brands seek to take credit in positive contexts and avoid blame for negative events.

Originality/value

This paper explores brand alliances via the level of integration and leads brand status, which are key determinants of consumer attributions of responsibility.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 54 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 10 February 2012

Bendik Meling Samuelsen and Lars Erling Olsen

Brand managers must decide between extension and alliance strategies to grow their brands. This paper aims to describe testing of consumers' responses to two alternative…

Abstract

Purpose

Brand managers must decide between extension and alliance strategies to grow their brands. This paper aims to describe testing of consumers' responses to two alternative brand growth strategies: an extension strategy whereby a brand moves into a new category alone, and an alliance strategy whereby the same brand moves into the new category as a branded ingredient in a brand already established in that category. How far to stretch a brand is yet another strategic choice facing the brand manager, and the current research tests, under short and long category‐stretch conditions, the attitudinal responses to extension and alliance strategies.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper builds on the categorisation and incongruence literature. An experiment was employed to test the main hypotheses in the study.

Findings

Extensions outperform alliances, especially when the brand undertakes a long stretch, and short‐stretch strategies outperform long‐stretch strategies.

Practical implications

An extension strategy may be preferred to an alliance strategy, especially in situations in which the new growth opportunity requires a long stretch.

Originality/value

The paper compares, in the same study, the attitudinal effects of two important growth strategies widely employed by companies. Previous studies have assessed the performance of these two strategic options only separately.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 46 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2006

David Owen James

Since publication, Aaker and Keller's seminal paper on brand extensions has received acclaimed support and criticism. This paper aims to return to the original work and…

Abstract

Purpose

Since publication, Aaker and Keller's seminal paper on brand extensions has received acclaimed support and criticism. This paper aims to return to the original work and extend the frameworks presented to brand alliances. The study seeks to examine the dimensions used in the original model and attempt to identify whether the brand extension dimensions can be applied to brand alliances.

Design/methodology/approach

Using quantitative research techniques through a structured study using 11 real brands in eight hypothetical alliances over 260 respondents, the study examines the reapplication of the brand extension framework to brand alliances.

Findings

The study has found that, though some extension elements apply to alliances, the role of fit takes on particular importance, whereas difficulty of making assumes a minor role, and that the basic extension framework can be applied to brand alliances.

Research limitations/limitations

The study used real consumer brands in hypothetical extensions and alliances with student samples from the UK. Different results may be found using alternative samples and with real brands.

Originality/value

The paper adds value to the literature and to practitioners' understanding of brand leverage by identifying that, though Aaker and Keller's study framework is applicable to brand alliances, the role of fit between partners takes on a central role to the detriment of difficulty of making.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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Article
Publication date: 2 March 2012

Wei‐Lun Chang and Kuan‐Chi Chang

The purpose of this paper is to discuss corporate co‐branding value and create the model of evaluating co‐branding value. The connotation of the model is to consider the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss corporate co‐branding value and create the model of evaluating co‐branding value. The connotation of the model is to consider the compatibility of strategic partners such as strategic alliance compatibility and brand alliance compatibility; in addition, this research can estimate the corporate co‐branding value through this model to evaluate and discuss the effect of co‐branding effect for the future.

Design/methodology/approach

In the past, few researchers investigated the measurement of corporate co‐branding value in the marketing sector. The measurement of intangible assets, on the other hand, is well established in accounting finance. However, the concepts and methods of accounting finance cannot easily be applied to other areas. This paper provides a straightforward concept that uses a heuristic model to combine the notion of co‐branding synergy. According to the literature, the combination of strategic and brand alliances can affect the concept of co‐branding value. This research revises the concept of compatibility from Park and Lawson by replacing the concept of product attribute similarity with the ratio of sales growth, and the brand concept consistency with the ratio of market share after brand alliance.

Findings

This study verifies the proposed model synthetically with a real case (Sony‐Ericsson). Conversely, this research anticipates analyzing the model in different perspectives and observing the variation of different combinations to obtain potential managerial implications for corporate managers. This research concludes: brand alliance compatibility has limited effect on corporate co‐branding value; strategic alliance compatibility is the major power to drive the direction of corporate co‐branding value; and the trend of co‐branding value is the important indicator for business managers.

Research limitations/implications

Insufficient information may generate incorrect or unclear trends if the year of co‐branding is too short. This is also a major limitation of the authors' research. Thus, more real‐world cases can be conducted (such as Miller and Coors) in the future to elaborate upon the model.

Practical implications

The proposed model helps enterprises estimate their current co‐branding value using existing financial statements and market share data and identify the degree of alliance influence to their revise brand strategies. The estimated co‐branding values in this study can help managers identify their market position and execute existing co‐brand strategies. Managers can utilize this information to revise their management direction or strategies. Based on these arguments, this research enhances existing co‐branding knowledge and offers significant contributions by presenting more real cases (e.g. Miller and Coors) in the future. In other words, this work is both an avenue and a blueprint for future co‐branding research.

Originality/value

The paper devises a novel concept for estimating corporate co‐branding value based on the synergies between strategic and brand alliances. To illustrate the proposed model, this study analyzes the Sony Ericsson example since it has survived for several years. Analytical results reveal that strategic alliance and brand alliance variations have significant influences on co‐branding value changes. Results also reveal that strategic alliances have a greater effect on co‐branding value than brand alliances, which indicates that a good alliance strategy may generate a superior co‐branding effect.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. 41 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

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Article
Publication date: 21 May 2019

Yiran Su and Thilo Kunkel

The purpose of this paper is to examine the underlying mechanism of the spillover effect from a service brand alliance to its parent brand at the post-consumption stage.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the underlying mechanism of the spillover effect from a service brand alliance to its parent brand at the post-consumption stage.

Design/methodology/approach

Online surveys were used to collect both qualitative and quantitative data from participants of an actual event. Conceptual models were developed and tested on two cross-sectional samples using structural equation modeling.

Findings

Results demonstrate perceived brand contribution and consumer involvement mediate the relationship between the service brand alliance experience and the evaluation of its parent brand at the post-consumption stage. While perceived brand fit had an indirect effect on the parent brand, the spillover was mostly driven by service alliance experience and perceived brand contribution.

Practical implications

Findings indicate brand managers should focus on consumers’ brand experience of the service brand alliance to drive spillover evaluations to the parent brand, and organizations could extend brand alliances to services with low category fit to the parent brand if consumers are to have a good experience with the service brand alliance.

Originality/value

This research extends findings on brand alliance research that was based on hypothetical brands and indicated that the spillover effect from a brand alliance to the parent brand is influenced by perceived brand fit. The findings highlight the importance of consumer experiences in driving the spillover effect at the post-consumption stage, where consumers evaluate brand relationships from a value-added perspective that goes beyond the service category fit.

Details

Journal of Service Management, vol. 30 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

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Article
Publication date: 6 November 2018

Jin Kyun Lee, Byung-Kwan Lee and Wei-Na Lee

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of country-of-origin (COO) fit and consumer product knowledge on consumer brand attitudes in a cross-border…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of country-of-origin (COO) fit and consumer product knowledge on consumer brand attitudes in a cross-border strategic brand alliance (SBA).

Design/methodology/approach

An experimental study with 207 subjects was conducted using a series of 2 (COO fit: low vs high COO fit) by 3 (product knowledge: low vs moderate vs high knowledge) by 2 (time: pre- vs post-alliance attitudes) mixed factorial design.

Findings

The impact of COO fit on pre- and post-alliance changes in attitude toward the partner brand showed a nonlinear relationship from high-, to moderate-, to low-knowledge consumers. High COO fit significantly and positively affected pre- and post-alliance changes in attitude toward the partner brand more for high- and low-knowledge consumers than for moderate-knowledge consumers. In contrast, low COO fit significantly and positively affected pre- and post-alliance changes in attitude toward the partner brand more for moderate-knowledge consumers than for high- and low-knowledge consumers.

Practical implications

The effectiveness of cross-border SBAs differs with consumer product knowledge. For high- and low-knowledge consumers, high COO fit information had greater impact than low COO fit information in their product evaluation. However, when targeting moderate-knowledge consumers, providing sufficient product-related attribute information would help them to generate a favorable brand attitude.

Originality/value

This study attempted to identify the complex relationship between COO fit and consumer product knowledge on the consumer decision-making process.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 30 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2018

Baolong Ma, Feiyan Cheng, Jingjing Bu and Jiefan Jiang

Although brand alliance has become quite ubiquitous in the marketplace and attracted considerable interest amongst researchers, little research has investigated its…

Abstract

Purpose

Although brand alliance has become quite ubiquitous in the marketplace and attracted considerable interest amongst researchers, little research has investigated its effects on the brand equity of partners. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate why and how brand alliance affects the brand equity of the partners in an alliance.

Design/methodology/approach

The hypotheses were tested by analysing the data of 260 participants in China, which were collected from an experiment.

Findings

This research draws five conclusions: the brand equity of a pre-alliance partner has a positive effect on brand alliance evaluation; product fit and brand fit amongst partners also have a positive effect on brand alliance evaluation; alliance brand evaluation has a positive impact on the brand equity of a post-alliance brand; the brand equity of a pre-alliance partner exerts a positive effect on the brand equity of a post-alliance partner; and the spillover effect of brand alliance for a weak brand is stronger than that of a strong brand in an asymmetrical brand alliance.

Originality/value

This research introduces brand equity into the field of brand alliance. From the perspective of consumer perception, the authors measure brand equity and provide insights for a company to effectively enhance brand equity through brand alliance. The authors explore ways to increase the brand equity of partners through brand alliance. Additionally, the authors discuss the spillover effects of the brand equity of partners in symmetric and asymmetric brand alliances.

Details

Journal of Contemporary Marketing Science, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2516-7480

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Article
Publication date: 24 May 2013

Bashar S. Gammoh and Kevin E. Voss

The purpose of this paper is to investigate alliance formation competence and attitudes toward brand alliances as antecedents of the firm's propensity to brand ally. It…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate alliance formation competence and attitudes toward brand alliances as antecedents of the firm's propensity to brand ally. It aims to test the hypothesis that the relationship between alliance experience and alliance competence is moderated by the relative quality of the experience, which the authors call valence of alliance experience.

Design/methodology/approach

Research hypotheses were empirically tested with a national sample of senior marketing executives and brand managers.

Findings

The firm's propensity to engage in brand alliances is a function of well‐developed strategic alliance capabilities and positive managerial attitudes toward brand alliances. Importantly, when the firm's prior experience in alliances is relatively more positive the relationship between alliance experience and alliance competence is strengthened.

Originality/value

Not all alliance experience is the same. This study, one of the first studies to examine the relative quality of alliance experience, confirms that the relationship between alliance experience and alliance competence is significantly stronger when that experience has been relatively more positive. This study also contributes to the strategic alliance literature by providing empirical evidence for the importance of managers' attitudes toward brand alliances in driving the firm's propensity to brand ally. By choosing brand alliances as the context for the study the paper contributes to the brand alliance literature by investigating the brand alliance phenomenon from the firm's perspective.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 47 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

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