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1 – 10 of 31
Article
Publication date: 7 March 2019

Yuhee Jung and Norihiko Takeuchi

Although social exchange theory has long been used to explain employees’ positive work attitudes in response to perceived investment in employee development (PIED), few…

Abstract

Purpose

Although social exchange theory has long been used to explain employees’ positive work attitudes in response to perceived investment in employee development (PIED), few studies have examined this theoretical mechanism by introducing a direct measure of social exchange between employees and their personified organization. Furthermore, most studies have focused solely on one type of exchange (i.e. social exchange) and have ignored another type of exchange characterized as economic exchange. The purpose of this paper is therefore to uncover the process by which PIED affects employees’ attitudes, including affective organizational commitment and job satisfaction, by examining the mediating roles of both social and economic exchanges.

Design/methodology/approach

To test the hypothesized mediating model, this study conducted a three-phase, time-lagged questionnaire survey and collected data from 545 full-time employees. The model was tested based on structural equation modeling with a bootstrap test of indirect effects.

Findings

In line with social exchange theory, the findings showed that social exchange perceptions positively mediated the relationships between PIED and affective commitment/job satisfaction, whereas economic exchange perceptions negatively mediated them. Additionally, social and economic exchange perceptions were found to partially mediate the relationship between PIED and affective commitment but fully mediate the relationship between PIED and job satisfaction.

Practical implications

These results suggest that employers would benefit from investing in employee development, provided workers see the training investment as the employer’s side of social exchange, which in turn leads to increased affective commitment and job satisfaction. When employers do not achieve the expected returns from the training investment, they should check not only hard data (e.g. training attendance rate, hours of training, etc.) but also soft data (e.g. employees’ perceptions of training investment, social exchange, etc.) by conducting employee surveys and communicating with line managers.

Originality/value

The main contribution of this study is that it provides important empirical support for social exchange theory in the context of organizational training investment and employees’ attitudinal outcomes, by directly testing the positive mediating role of social exchange and the negative role of economic exchange.

Article
Publication date: 8 February 2016

Anders Dysvik, Bård Kuvaas and Robert Buch

The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether the relationship between perceived investment in employee development (PIED) and taking charge is moderated by perceived

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether the relationship between perceived investment in employee development (PIED) and taking charge is moderated by perceived job autonomy.

Design/methodology/approach

Self-report data were obtained from 737 employees. In addition, manager ratings of taking charge were obtained for 154 employees from their respective managers. Hierarchical moderated regression analyses were used to test the hypotheses.

Findings

The results revealed a positive relationship between PIED and both self-reported and manager-rated taking charge only for employees who perceived high levels of job autonomy.

Research limitations/implications

Given the cross-sectional nature of the data, no causal inferences can be drawn.

Practical implications

Managers and organizations may benefit from providing work conditions that facilitate a felt obligation to reciprocate, but at the same time provide sufficient levels of perceived job autonomy to actually do so with respect to increasing the levels of employees’ voluntary and constructive efforts to improve work situations.

Social implications

Greater levels of employee taking charge behaviors may offset the decline of businesses and thus aid in reducing long-term unemployment in the society at large.

Originality/value

This study contributes to a more complete understanding of how job characteristics may facilitate or inhibit the influence of antecedents for taking charge.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 December 2019

Sanat Kozhakhmet, Sharmila Jayasingam, Nauman Majeed and Samia Jamshed

The purpose of this paper is to explore the effect of perceived investment in employee development (PIED) on knowledge sharing (KS) behavior by examining the mediating…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the effect of perceived investment in employee development (PIED) on knowledge sharing (KS) behavior by examining the mediating role of psychological capital and moderating role of organizational identification.

Design/methodology/approach

Questionnaires were used to collect data from 340 employees from largest MNCs working in Kazakhstan.

Findings

The results show that psychological capital mediates the relationship between PIED and knowledge sharing behavior (KSB). Moreover, it was found that organizational identification moderates the association between individuals’ psychological capital and their KSB. The mediated moderation analyses supported the hypothesized model.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to a more complete understanding of how investment in employee development may support or build employees’ psychological capital which in turn facilitates KS.

Article
Publication date: 27 November 2018

Jatinder Kumar Jha, Jatin Pandey and Biju Varkkey

This paper aims to examine the relationship between perceived investments in employeesdevelopment (PIED) on work engagement and the moderating effects of psychological…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the relationship between perceived investments in employeesdevelopment (PIED) on work engagement and the moderating effects of psychological capital on this relationship for liquid knowledge workers, employed in the Indian cutting and polishing of diamond industry (CPD).

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire composed of established scales was administered to 134 liquid knowledge workers. Having established convergent and discriminant validity using structural equation modelling, the model was further analysed using the Process macro to check for direct and moderating effects.

Findings

The research findings suggest that the perceived investment in employee development and psychological contract enhancement (relational and transactional) made by CPD units for liquid knowledge workers positively influenced their work engagement level. The study also finds that relational contract (not transactional contract) positively moderates the relationship between perceived investment in employee development and work engagement.

Research limitations/implications

This is a cross-sectional single source study; future studies could look at longitudinal and multisource perspective.

Practical implications

The study presents a “star matrix of engagement” that guides the application of the two strategies of perceived employee development and psychological contract enhancement for liquid knowledge workers. This has implications for design and implementation of human resource management practices and policies for employee management.

Originality/value

The study makes significant contributions to existing literature on antecedents of work engagement of liquid knowledge workers by examining the direct and moderating influences.

Article
Publication date: 17 December 2018

Hannah Vivian Osei, Ahmed Agyapong and Kwame Owusu Kwateng

Interest has been generated for a while in unpacking the “black box” and providing a contingency approach to understanding the effects of human resource management (HRM…

Abstract

Purpose

Interest has been generated for a while in unpacking the “black box” and providing a contingency approach to understanding the effects of human resource management (HRM) practices. This study aims to investigate the possibility that the relationship between human capital development and task performance is mediated by work self-efficacy and work engagement – and that this mediation depends on the degree of perceived investment in employeesdevelopment.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on a synthesis of theories –systems, social cognitive and social identity theories – a moderated mediation model is tested using data from 220 academic employees and Heads of Departments from multiple Higher Educational Institutions in Ghana. AMOS and Hayes Conditional Process analysis were used to analyze the data.

Findings

The study finds support for a bundle of human capital investments boosting work self-efficacy and motivating work engagement, as well as task performance. Consistent with expectations, the mediation in human capital investments to task performance via work self-efficacy is conditional on the degree of perceived investment in employeesdevelopment.

Originality/value

The study provides the first attempt at studying a conditional process model in human capital development by addressing whether, how and when human capital system functions more or less effectively, and provides knowledge on the “black box” in HRM.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 27 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 26 February 2020

This paper aims to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting-edge research and case studies.

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting-edge research and case studies.

Design/methodology/approach

This briefing is prepared by an independent writer who adds their own impartial comments and places the articles in context.

Findings

Investing in training and development HRM practices enables companies to show their employees that they are valued. Employee response is likelier to be positive when the investment is perceived in terms of social exchange reflecting a long-term relationship based on mutual trust rather than more impersonal economic exchange where concern for the employee is minimal.

Originality/value

The briefing saves busy executives and researchers hours of reading time by selecting only the very best, most pertinent information and presenting it in a condensed and easy-to-digest format.

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. 35 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 October 2017

Karin A. King

Navigating a dynamic global landscape, businesses must not only define talent strategy but apply it effectively in practice. By intentionally establishing consistent…

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Abstract

Purpose

Navigating a dynamic global landscape, businesses must not only define talent strategy but apply it effectively in practice. By intentionally establishing consistent talent practices, discernible to employees, organisations signal priorities for talent, establishing a psychological “climate for talent” to sustain talent development over time. The strong talent system and talent climate are introduced. The purpose of this paper is to introduce the importance of organisational context to talent management.

Design/methodology/approach

A strategic climate for talent and strong talent system are theorised with “strong situation” specifications: distinctiveness, consistency, consensus and context.

Findings

A strategic climate for talent is defined. Empirical study is required to develop and validate the talent climate construct.

Practical implications

Employees’ interpretations of talent practices as signals of organisational priorities will influence the effectiveness of talent strategy implementation. This paper highlights the importance of a contextually relevant, consistently implemented talent system which signals the organisation’s invitation to employees to develop their potential in alignment with business strategy, enhancing career outcomes and supporting employees’ perceptions of inclusion and procedural fairness in talent management (TM). It supports management practice in an increasingly dynamic context to implement sufficiently distinct, consistent and contextually relevant talent practices.

Originality/value

The strategic climate for talent, perceivable by individual employees and resulting from a strong talent system, is introduced. This paper extends strategic human resources management, TM and climate literatures introducing a cross-level model of strategic organisational climate which examines proximal employee outcomes of TM practices.

Details

Journal of Organizational Effectiveness: People and Performance, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2051-6614

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 August 2018

Badrinarayan Srirangam Ramaprasad, Sethumadhavan Lakshminarayanan and Yogesh P. Pai

The purpose of this paper is to advance the research on the relationship between developmental human resource management (HRM) practices and voluntary intention to leave…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to advance the research on the relationship between developmental human resource management (HRM) practices and voluntary intention to leave among information technology (IT) professionals from the Indian IT sector by investigating the mediating role of affective commitment.

Design/methodology/approach

This study adopted a cross-sectional design at the individual-level of analysis. Data on the study constructs (i.e. developmental HRM practices, affective commitment, and voluntary intention to leave) were collected from 752 IT professionals from 17 Indian IT organizations from the city of Bengaluru through a web-based survey between February 2016 and March 2017. Further, this study used the confirmatory factor analysis technique to establish reliability and construct validity for the study constructs. Furthermore, this study tested the research hypotheses empirically through mediated multiple-regression analysis using the bootstrap procedure.

Findings

Empirical results of the present study suggest that espousal of robust developmental HRM interventions enhances affective commitment and significantly attenuates the voluntary intention to leave among employees. Further, the results of this study have indicated that the relationship between developmental HRM practices and voluntary intention to leave was partially mediated by affective commitment.

Originality/value

Past empirical studies on HRM – turnover discourse, in the IT sector, have predominantly examined the direct influence of HRM systems and/or internal labor market strategies on turnover intentions and actual turnover behavior. Rarely have the past studies in the IT domain attempted to examine the intervening role of employee attitudes in the relationship between HRM practices and employee-level outcomes. Addressing this gap, the present study enunciates the critical role of affective commitment and situates it as an important variable that mediates the relationship between developmental HRM practices and voluntary intention to leave among IT professionals in India.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 50 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2002

George K. Chacko

Develops an original 12‐step management of technology protocol and applies it to 51 applications which range from Du Pont’s failure in Nylon to the Single Online Trade…

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Abstract

Develops an original 12‐step management of technology protocol and applies it to 51 applications which range from Du Pont’s failure in Nylon to the Single Online Trade Exchange for Auto Parts procurement by GM, Ford, Daimler‐Chrysler and Renault‐Nissan. Provides many case studies with regards to the adoption of technology and describes seven chief technology officer characteristics. Discusses common errors when companies invest in technology and considers the probabilities of success. Provides 175 questions and answers to reinforce the concepts introduced. States that this substantial journal is aimed primarily at the present and potential chief technology officer to assist their survival and success in national and international markets.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 14 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 July 2008

Herman Aguinis, Mahfooz A. Ansari, Sharmila Jayasingam and Rehana Aafaqi

Based on the leadership, entrepreneurship, and issue selling literature, we hypothesized that entrepreneurs who are perceived to be successful can be differentiated from…

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Abstract

Based on the leadership, entrepreneurship, and issue selling literature, we hypothesized that entrepreneurs who are perceived to be successful can be differentiated from unsuccessful entrepreneurs based on their degree and type of social power. We conducted a field experiment including 305 Malaysian managers with considerable experience in working with entrepreneurs and in entrepreneurial environments. Entrepreneurs perceived to be successful were ascribed greater referent, information, expert, connection, and reward power; less coercive power; and similar legitimate power than unsuccessful entrepreneurs. These results provide evidence in support of social power as a distinguishing individual characteristic of successful entrepreneurs and make a contribution to theories linking social capital with entrepreneurial success. Aspiring entrepreneurs need to be aware that their social power profile is associated with various degrees of perceived success. Our paper points to the need to investigate variables beyond personality and that are more directly relevant to social and interpersonal interactions that may differentiate entrepreneurs perceived to be successful from those who are not.

Details

Management Research: Journal of the Iberoamerican Academy of Management, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1536-5433

Keywords

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