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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2006

Ching‐Chow Yang

The perceived advantages of the implementation of TQM are generating improved quality and efficiency, increasing customer satisfaction, thus improving competitiveness…

8734

Abstract

Purpose

The perceived advantages of the implementation of TQM are generating improved quality and efficiency, increasing customer satisfaction, thus improving competitiveness. However, there is a high failure rate in the implementation of TQM. The key issue in this regard is that companies have devoted relatively little attention to human resources management (HRM). Several academics and practitioners have asserted that synergy and congruence among HRM practices are critical to the implementation of TQM. However, there is relatively little empirical evidence to support this contention. The purpose of this research is to conduct an empirical study on high‐tech firms, in order to analyse the impacts of HRM practices on the implementation of TQM.

Design/methodology/approach

In this study, a research framework related to HRM practices, TQM practices, and quality performances was developed. Based on the framework, a questionnaire was designed and sent to the HR managers or chief executive officers (CEOs) of high‐tech companies in Taiwan to investigate the effect of HRM practices on the implementation and practice of TQM.

Findings

The study confirms that HRM significantly affects TQM practices. The study concluded that HRM practices have a significantly positive effect on the implementation of TQM. Implementing HRM practices can also have a significant effect on employee and customer satisfaction. It also positively affected “employees' quality awareness” and “corporate image”. The quality performances were also significantly affected by the implementation of TQM.

Research limitations/implications

The research limitation is that the empirical study was on high‐tech firms in Taiwan only. However, the framework can be easily extended to other industries if survey results are available.

Practical implications

Overall, successful implementation of TQM can lead to an increase in customer satisfaction, and then benefit corporate image. It can also improve the satisfaction and quality awareness of employees. Enterprises that devote themselves to the implementation of TQM also need to perform HRM aggressively, if they are to increase the firm's performance significantly.

Originality/value

In this research, a conceptual framework related to HRM practices and TQM practices was developed, which is a valuable reference for future research. This study confirms the impacts of HRM practices on the implementation of TQM, and several key practices can be investigated.

Details

The TQM Magazine, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-478X

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 18 August 2006

Miriam Erez

This chapter discusses the strengths and challenges posed by the chapter by Aumann and Ostroff entitled, “Multi-Level Fit: An Integrative Framework for Understanding HRM

Abstract

This chapter discusses the strengths and challenges posed by the chapter by Aumann and Ostroff entitled, “Multi-Level Fit: An Integrative Framework for Understanding HRM Practices in Cross-Cultural Contexts.” In addition, this chapter proposes an alternative multi-level model of culture, which consists of structural and dynamic dimensions with culture's strength as a moderator of the top-down bottom-up dynamic processes. This model assumes that there is a fit between the value system and the HRM practices, as they represent two layers of culture – visible and less visible. Yet, the fit can be interrupted when HRM practices are transferred across cultures. The chapter further discusses when HRM practices are rejected and when they are accepted despite the misfit.

Details

Multi-Level Issues in Social Systems
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-432-4

Article
Publication date: 26 April 2011

Boyi Wang

The purpose of this paper is to gain an understanding of the current status, major concerns and trends faced by Chinese HRM professionals in relation to Wayne Chen and Hay…

1924

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to gain an understanding of the current status, major concerns and trends faced by Chinese HRM professionals in relation to Wayne Chen and Hay Group China's engagement in its client organizations, also to identify the relationship between HRM research and practices in China.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reports an interview with an established HRM consulting practitioner, Wayne Chen, Managing Director of Hay Group Northeast Asia.

Findings

The gap in HRM professionals' skill set between China and Western countries may take years to close. The impact of Chinese culture in the workplace also indicates HRM practice is different to that in the West. The focal area of China HRM practices is to help organizations achieve their strategic goals by effectively managing and developing talents additionally, research informed HRM practice proves to be effective in enhancing the contributions of HRM practices to organizations.

Practical implications

The practical implication is obvious as the interviewee is with a leading consultant currently engaged in real world Chinese HRM practice. This paper also informs future research on Chinese HRM.

Originality/value

The interviewee, Wayne Chen, offers valuable insights for both HRM practitioners and researchers about current status and future trends in Chinese HRM practices.

Details

Journal of Chinese Human Resources Management, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8005

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 October 2022

Muhammad Burhan, Omar Abou Hamdan, Hussain Tariq, Zahid Hameed and Rana Muhammad Naeem

This study examines the influence of contextual factors (e.g. age and ownership type) on HRM formality (including the underlying functions of recruitment, selection…

Abstract

Purpose

This study examines the influence of contextual factors (e.g. age and ownership type) on HRM formality (including the underlying functions of recruitment, selection, training and development, performance appraisal and compensation) in SMEs.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected through a quantitative survey of 300 owners/managers of services, manufacturing and trade SMEs in Pakistan.

Findings

Firm age, association with a larger parent entity, existence of a strategic business plan and the presence of a human resource information system (HRIS) are positively related with higher HRM formality. Firm size, family ownership and exporting characteristics had no association with formality.

Practical implications

This study suggests a highly influential role for contextual factors in shaping HRM practices in Pakistani SMEs. Since the lack of a strategic approach towards human resource development is directly linked to the inferior performance of SMEs in Pakistan, this study provides an understanding of the contextual institutional setting that shapes the nature of HRM practices. The findings inform both SME owners/managers and policy makers.

Originality/value

Institutional influences on HRM systems have attracted attention but organisational factors are less often studied. Studies mostly relate to Western contexts and lack perspectives from SMEs. The findings of this empirical investigation highlight the importance of context specific research given the different nature of institutional settings.

Details

Employee Relations: The International Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

Keywords

Abstract

Details

The Ideological Evolution of Human Resource Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-389-2

Book part
Publication date: 18 August 2006

Kerstin A. Aumann and Cheri Ostroff

In recent years, theory and research have been increasingly devoted to understanding organizational behavior in cross-cultural and global contexts, with particular…

Abstract

In recent years, theory and research have been increasingly devoted to understanding organizational behavior in cross-cultural and global contexts, with particular attention being paid to the appropriateness of various human resources management (HRM) practices because practices that may be effective within one cultural context may not be effective in other cultural contexts. This chapter argues that a multi-level perspective is needed to explain the interplay between HRM practices and employee responses across cultural contexts. Specifically, the multi-level framework developed in this chapter elucidates the importance of fit between HRM practices, individual values, organizational values, and societal values. Societal values play a key role in the adoption of HRM practices, and the effectiveness of these HRM practices will depend largely on “fit” or alignment with the values of the societal culture in which the organization is operating. HRM practices also shape the collective responses of employees through organizational climate at the organizational level and through psychological climate at the individual level. For positive employee attitudes and responses to emerge, the climate created by the HRM practices must be aligned with societal and individual values. Building on these notions, the strength of the societal culture in which the organization is operating serves as a mechanism that links relationships between climate, value fit, and attitudes across levels of analysis. The chapter concludes with some recommendations for future research and implications for practice.

Details

Multi-Level Issues in Social Systems
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-432-4

Abstract

Details

The Emerald Handbook of Work, Workplaces and Disruptive Issues in HRM
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80071-780-0

Article
Publication date: 15 March 2011

Carol Gill and Denny Meyer

This research aims to answer the call for more empirical research on identity theory by exploring the role and impact of human resource management (HRM) policy, and the…

11525

Abstract

Purpose

This research aims to answer the call for more empirical research on identity theory by exploring the role and impact of human resource management (HRM) policy, and the gap between HRM policy and practice, on organizations and their employees. It looks at the role that soft policy plays in obscuring hard practice and considers the impact of unions and HRM role on policy.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses survey data collected from the senior members of the HRM function in 189 large Australian organisations.

Findings

The research found a gap between policy and practice with soft policy being used more often than soft practice. It found that a gap between policy and practice has a negative impact on outcomes. Strategic HRM (SHRM) positively impacts on the implementation of soft practices reducing the gap between policy and practice and impoverished HRM that lacks resources, power and time, has a larger gap between policy and practice. Unions did not improve outcomes by minimizing the gap between policy and practice.

Research limitations/implications

This paper used survey data from HRM managers, who whilst being the best single source of information, may have distorted their responses. Further research is required to confirm these results using several data sources.

Practical implications

Managers and HR functions should increase both soft policy and soft practice and ensure there is no gap between policy and practice. To achieve this, organizations should ensure that the HRM function is both strategic and effectively resourced.

Originality/value

This research makes a theoretical and empirical contribution to debates on the role that HRM rhetoric plays in organizations. It also adds value to SHRM research and practice.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 September 2019

Shaoheng Li, Christopher J. Rees and Mohamed Branine

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between employees’ perceptions of HRM practices and two outcomes, namely, employee commitment and turnover…

1807

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between employees’ perceptions of HRM practices and two outcomes, namely, employee commitment and turnover intention (TI), in small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) in mainland China.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper adopts a quantitative approach based on a sample of 227 employees working in 24 SMEs in eastern and western China.

Findings

Employees’ perceptions of HRM practices, such as training and development, reward management and performance management, are significant predictors of employee commitment. A negative direct relationship is found between employees’ perceptions about the use of HRM practices and TIs.

Research limitations/implications

Although data were collected from two representative provinces of eastern and western China, the size of the sample may limit the generalisability of the findings to the wider region.

Practical implications

The relationship between employees’ perceptions of HRM practices and employee outcomes in Chinese SMEs provides an effective way for SME owners and HR practitioners to generate desirable employee attitudes and behaviours, which, ultimately contribute to improving organisational performance.

Originality/value

This is an original paper which makes a contribution by helping to address the dearth of studies which have explored aspects of the effectiveness of HRM in SMEs in China. In contrast to the majority of China-focussed studies on this topic, it highlights HRM outcomes at the individual level rather than the organisational level. Further, the study involves SMEs in western China which is an under-explored region.

Details

Employee Relations: The International Journal, vol. 41 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2004

Barbara Myloni, Anne‐Wil K. Harzing and Hafiz Mirza

This paper concerns the transfer of human resource management (HRM) practices by multinational companies (MNCs) to their overseas subsidiaries. It investigates how factors…

14233

Abstract

This paper concerns the transfer of human resource management (HRM) practices by multinational companies (MNCs) to their overseas subsidiaries. It investigates how factors originating from the cultural and institutional framework of the host country impact on this transfer. Using data collected from MNC subsidiaries located in Greece and local Greek firms, we examine the degree to which several HRM practices in MNC subsidiaries resemble local practices. Our empirical findings indicate that subsidiaries have adapted their HRM practices to a considerable extent, although some practices are more localised than others. Specifically, practices that do not fit well with Greek culture or are in contrast to employee regulations show a low level of transfer. On the other hand, our interviews revealed that significant cultural changes are underway and that the institutional environment is gradually getting more relaxed, leaving more room to manoeuvre for MNCs.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 25 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Keywords

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