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Article

Andrea Geissinger and Christofer Laurell

The purpose of this paper is to explore the effects of fashion weeks on brand constellations of participating fashion companies in social media.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the effects of fashion weeks on brand constellations of participating fashion companies in social media.

Design/methodology/approach

The study analyses how brand constellations take form for seven Swedish fashion companies before, during and after Fashion Week Stockholm. In total, 3,449 user-generated contents referring to the sampled brands were collected and analysed.

Findings

On average, brand constellations of participating companies are increasingly incorporating other participating brands as a result of the fashion week. Based on the presented results, four brand constellation outcomes for participating fashion companies are identified: brand constellation amplification, concentration, division and dilution.

Research limitations/implications

As this paper is focussed on the Swedish market, additional results from fashion weeks taking place in other cities would be beneficial to verify the four brand constellation outcomes.

Practical implications

The results question the resilience of professionally curated brand constellations due to the emergence of user-driven constellations that also shape the position of fashion brands. Therefore, this development can potentially have a considerable impact on often carefully orchestrated brand positioning strategies executed by fashion companies.

Social implications

Digitally fuelled interdependences of brand constellations by professionals and consumers attest to the dilution of borders between consumers and producers.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the field of fashion marketing and management by identifying four different brand constellation outcomes in social media for participating fashion companies as a result of fashion weeks and how to managerially handle these respective outcomes.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

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Article

Junpeng Guo, Chunxin Zhang, Yi Wu, Hao Li and Yu Liu

Government social media profiles (GSPs) are increasingly used by government agencies during social crises, and the success of GSPs is highly dependent on netizens…

Abstract

Purpose

Government social media profiles (GSPs) are increasingly used by government agencies during social crises, and the success of GSPs is highly dependent on netizens’ participation behavior (NPB). Drawing upon the social support theory, the purpose of this paper is to propose a theoretical model to examine the determinants and outcomes of NPB during a social crisis.

Design/methodology/approach

To test the research model, a field survey was conducted in the context of Tianjin 2015 explosions in China. The authors adopted a two-step approach to test the models. First, the authors conducted exploratory factor analysis to evaluate the measurement properties of the reflective latent constructs. Then, the authors performed a structural equation analysis to test the hypotheses.

Findings

The results show that information support and emotional support are significant determinants of NPB and persona involvement moderates the relationships between them. Additionally, this study reveals that information source preference and increasing enthusiasm for becoming a civil journalist are two critical and significant outcomes of NPB.

Research limitations/implications

There are some limitations in this paper that must be taken into account when interpreting its findings. First, the study is designed on a single profile and concerns a single social crisis. Additionally, future research might consider incorporating factors beyond the individual level, e.g., community social capital (Putnam, 1993). Finally, with the emergence of various IT platforms, such as a government’s own website and online forms, future research can investigate how their characteristics can facilitate other social media platforms’ participation.

Practical implications

This paper offers a number of crucial research implications to the literature of social media in crisis management, thereby contributing to the explanation of NPB on GSPs in the management of social crises. Considering social support as a factor affecting NPB on GSPs, the authors also add personal involvement to the research on the functions of NPB on GSPs and include encouraging civil journalist and making GSPs the principal source of political information.

Social implications

The research provides participating netizens on GSPs with some suggestions about generating more cost-effective and useful interventions to improve netizen participation levels on GSPs. The findings highlight that governmental social media profiles must focus on continuous development, such as trying best to satisfy the habits of netizens, to motivate netizens to create dependence of information acquisition on the GSPs, called information source preference. On the other hand, the study reminds netizens of the importance of NPB on GSPs during crises and encourages them to act as civil journalist.

Originality/value

First, the study investigated the outcome effect of NPB on GSPs on netizens’ information source preference and civil journalist. Second, this study identifies the determinants of NBPs on GSPs from both the informational and the emotional support perspectives. Third, this study investigates the moderating effects of personal involvement on the relationships between determinants from social support and NPB on GSPs.

Details

Aslib Journal of Information Management, vol. 70 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-3806

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Book part

Rachel Kulick

Purpose – This paper explores how the interactive dynamics of peer education models within independent youth media outlets facilitate and impede youth engagement in media

Abstract

Purpose – This paper explores how the interactive dynamics of peer education models within independent youth media outlets facilitate and impede youth engagement in media activism and social change work, more broadly defined.Design/methodological approach – Ethnographic and participatory action research methods are used with the youth media hub, Youth Media Action (YMA), to examine the possibilities and challenges that peer media educators confront in cultivating a noncommercial space for the collective production of oppositional media. YMA specifically seeks to involve youth from marginalized communities.Findings – The results suggest that peer-to-peer education models do act as vehicles for political engagement as youth experience shared ownership, cultivate solidarity, and acquire community organizing skills through the collective production of oppositional media. At the same time, challenges can surface when peer educators juggle multiple roles and participating community youth groups espouse differing organizational values and pedagogical sensibilities.Research limitations/implications – This study offers a potential pathway for further research on how peer education and collective media making models influence youth citizenship and social change work.Originality/value – The focus on the organizational and social dynamics of peer education models is useful in understanding youth citizenship and digital access as a collective experience for youth living in disenfranchised communities that seek out these spaces for not only media making but also community building.

Details

Youth Engagement: The Civic-Political Lives of Children and Youth
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-544-9

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Article

Jenna Jacobson

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the 2012 Olympic opening ceremony with the goal of making a nuanced contribution to the discussion of online participation and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the 2012 Olympic opening ceremony with the goal of making a nuanced contribution to the discussion of online participation and engagement afforded by social media.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper applies a qualitative approach of sequential video analysis to the 2012 Olympic opening ceremony interpretive segment.

Findings

Despite the Olympics being a “networked media sport” where countries compete against each another in various sporting events, the paper argues that the overarching narrative of the London 2012 opening ceremony is one that breaks down traditional barriers, while simultaneously situating the individual at the centre of “networked spectatorship”.

Originality/value

Beyond merely watching media events, the paper proposes the term, “networked spectators” to identify how people participate in the content creation, social media moderation, and conversation using social media. Networked spectatorship moves away from the binary of active and passive participation, and rather reflects on the multiple ways people can engage in media events, which specifically includes social media monitoring/moderation as a form of participation.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 40 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

Keywords

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Article

Bidyut Hazarika, Alan Rea, Reza Mousavi and Kuanchin Chen

This study aims to investigate patterns of social media posting occurring during the initial post-disaster recovery period. In addition, the study investigates the…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate patterns of social media posting occurring during the initial post-disaster recovery period. In addition, the study investigates the antecedents of user engagement with Twitter posts or “tweets.”

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses Hurricane Harvey as the research focus because of its $125bn in damage and the recovery effort associated with it. Analyzing nearly 38,000 tweets related to 2017’s Hurricane Harvey and specifically focuses on rescuers who became to be known as the “Cajun Navy.”

Findings

The popularity of the tweet significantly influences social media engagement; disaster relief organizations first should seek out alliances and partnerships with those who already are well-known or influential in social media. In addition, by regularly monitoring and participating in social media, such as encouraging retweets and mentions even when not responding to a disaster, agencies will gain social media followers and influence when these are most needed.

Research limitations/implications

By analyzing patterns of social media posts during and after Hurricane Harvey, this study attempts to quantify social media’s effectiveness during this disaster, in particular with a focus on what characteristics of Harvey-related Twitter posts most influenced user engagement.

Practical implications

Findings underscore the need for agencies to strengthen their social media presence and use it in all three phases of disaster conceptualization. Beyond managing communication with other agencies and the community, which alone is critical for an agency’s impact, social media offers the world as a potential audience for agencies that can deftly leverage it.

Originality/value

Social media has revolutionized not only communication but also inter-connectivity as people have normalized its use. Its ubiquity and efficiency have seen its incorporation into the critical area of emergency management, both during and after disasters. The main objective of this paper is to investigate and evaluate the usefulness of social media in disaster recovery efforts, focusing on its advantages in relation to a recent disaster event.

Details

Global Knowledge, Memory and Communication, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9342

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Article

Zhenhua Wang, Shikui Dong, Zhihong He, Lei Wang, Weihua Yang and Bengt Ake Sunden

H2O, CO2 and CO are three main species in combustion systems which have high volume fractions. In addition, soot has strong absorption in the infrared band. Thus, H2O, CO2

Abstract

Purpose

H2O, CO2 and CO are three main species in combustion systems which have high volume fractions. In addition, soot has strong absorption in the infrared band. Thus, H2O, CO2, CO and soot may take important roles in radiative heat transfer. To provide calculations with high accuracy, all of the participating media should be considered non-gray media. Thus, the purpose of this paper is to study the effect of non-gray participating gases and soot on radiative heat transfer in an inhomogeneous and non-isothermal system.

Design/methodology/approach

To solve the radiative heat transfer, the fluid flow as well as the pressure, temperature and species distributions were first computed by FLUENT. The radiative properties of the participating media are calculated by the Statistical Narrow Band correlated K-distribution (SNBCK), which is based on the database of EM2C. The calculation of soot properties is based on the Mie scattering theory and Rayleigh theory. The radiative heat transfer is calculated by the discrete ordinate method (DOM).

Findings

Using SNBCK to calculate the radiative properties and DOM to calculate the radiative heat transfer, the influence of H2O, CO2, CO and soot on radiation heat flux to the wall in combustion system was studied. The results show that the global contribution of CO to the radiation heat flux on the wall in the kerosene furnace was about 2 per cent, but that it can reach up to 15 per cent in a solid fuel gasifier. The global contribution of soot to the radiation heat flux on the wall was 32 per cent. However, the scattering of soot has a tiny influence on radiation heat flux to the wall.

Originality/value

This is the first time H2O, CO2, CO and the scattering of soot were all considered simultaneously to study the radiation heat flux in combustion systems.

Details

International Journal of Numerical Methods for Heat & Fluid Flow, vol. 27 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0961-5539

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Article

Kofi Osei-Frimpong, Graeme McLean and Samuel Famiyeh

The purpose of this paper is to deepen the understanding on social media brand engagement (SMBE) practices by exploring the impact of consumer brand knowledge, perceived…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to deepen the understanding on social media brand engagement (SMBE) practices by exploring the impact of consumer brand knowledge, perceived social pressure, perceived social relatedness (PSR) and the role of brand trust.

Design/methodology/approach

A model is proposed to suggest the influence of consumer-level antecedents and moderators of SMBE. Following a survey design approach, data collected from 687 respondents on Facebook are examined through structural equation modelling using AMOS 23.0.

Findings

The findings reveal significant relationship between the examined antecedents (brand knowledge, perceived social pressure and brand trust) and SMBE. Examination of the moderation role of PSR revealed significant interaction effects on the relationship between brand knowledge and SMBE, as well as perceived social pressure and SMBE. The findings also suggest a lack of interaction effect of PSR on the relationship between brand trust and SMBE.

Research limitations/implications

This research provides empirical evidence in support of understanding SMBE practices by testing theoretically grounded hypotheses. The study focussed on technologically savvy respondents and only Facebook users in Ghana, which could limit the generalisation of the findings reported.

Practical implications

This study illustrates a need for managers to integrate multi-communication channels to enhance brand interactions and engagements. Firms must also adopt strategies that would enhance the sharing of interesting information about their brands on their social media platforms to attract others through customer networks.

Originality/value

The conceptualization of SMBE in this study zooms out our understanding of online SMBE by examining pertinent variables that drive or moderate consumer participation in SMBE activities. The integration of these variables brings out new empirical understanding and extends our knowledge on SMBE.

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Article

Barbara Case Fedock, Melissa McCartney and Douglas Neeley

The purpose of this paper is to explore how online adjunct higher education faculty members perceive the role of using social media sites as instructional approaches. A…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how online adjunct higher education faculty members perceive the role of using social media sites as instructional approaches. A purposeful sampling was used, and adjunct online higher education faculty members were invited to participate. An adjunct faculty member was defined as a person who taught part-time higher education courses; therefore, the faculty member was not hired as a full-time faculty member.

Design/methodology/approach

Qualitative researchers explore phenomena examining the lived experiences and participants behaviors; in this study, online adjunct instructors’ perceptions on classroom instructional social media online approaches were examined. Participants in this study were trained to teach higher education online courses and these teachers were the experts on the topic. The design for this study was an exploratory case study in which the participants were online adjunct instructors who taught at online higher education institutions in the Northeast. The case study approach was the most appropriate. The focus was the external events participants’ lives.

Findings

Three themes emerged from the analysis of the in-depth interview process. Based on the adjunct online higher education instructors’ perception on the use of social media teaching approaches in the classroom, the themes that emerged were uniformity of purpose vs personal beliefs need for justification importance student engagement and facilitation vs direct instruction. Themes reflected online teaching approaches higher education institutional missions and student learning and engagement outcomes.

Research limitations/implications

In this study, adjuncts’ perceptions expressed and themes found may not be characteristic of other adjunct instructors’ views. In qualitative studies, participants are asked open-ended interview questions, which may have been a limitation for this study. Quantitative questions, such as the impact of using social media as an instructional approach, were not asked. In this study, adjunct online higher education instructors were invited to share their views on the study topic. Additionally, qualitative researchers are limited by the data collection method and the data analysis process. Therefore, researchers who would like to repeat this study on adjunct online higher education teachers’ perspectives may be unable to duplicate the research.

Practical implications

The significance of this study is the need for a renewed global initiative in higher education to promote the use of social media training for online adjunct faculty members. Online higher education faculty members’ reflections on using social media tend to be recorded from a personal rather than a professional point of view.

Social implications

The implication for online higher education leaders is to review mission statements and reevaluate how the use of social media may impact student learning outcomes, student career readiness and student engagement opportunities.

Originality/value

The need for a renewed global initiative in higher education to promote the use of social media training for online adjunct faculty evolved as the significance of the study. Because inclusion requirements and workshop training for the use of social media in online higher education classrooms vary among higher education institutions, online adjunct faculty social media classroom practices and perceptions widely vary.

Details

Journal of Research in Innovative Teaching & Learning, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2397-7604

Keywords

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Article

H. Amiri, S.H. Mansouri and P.J. Coelho

The solution of radiative heat transfer problems in participating media is often obtained using the standard discrete ordinates method (SDOM). This method produces…

Abstract

Purpose

The solution of radiative heat transfer problems in participating media is often obtained using the standard discrete ordinates method (SDOM). This method produces anomalies caused by ray effects if radiative boundary conditions have discontinuities or abrupt changes. Ray effects may be mitigated using the modified discrete ordinates method (MDOM), which is based on superposition of the solutions obtained by considering separately radiation from the walls and radiation from the medium. The purpose of this paper is to study the role of ray effects in combined conduction‐radiation problems and investigate the superiority of the MDOM over SDOM.

Design/methodology/approach

The MDOM has been used to calculate radiative heat transfer in irregular geometries using body‐fitted coordinates. Here, the blocked‐off region concept, originally developed in computational fluid dynamics, is used along with the finite volume method and SDOM or MDOM to solve combined conduction‐radiation heat transport problems in irregular geometries. Enclosures with an absorbing, emitting and isotropically or anisotropically scattering medium are analyzed.

Findings

The results confirm the capability of the MDOM to minimize the anomalies due to ray effects in combined heat transfer problems, and demonstrate that MDOM is more computationally efficient than SDOM.

Originality/value

The paper demonstrates the application of MDOM to combined conduction‐radiation heat transfer problems in irregular geometries using blocked‐off method.

Details

International Journal of Numerical Methods for Heat & Fluid Flow, vol. 22 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0961-5539

Keywords

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Article

Wilson Ozuem, Kerry E. Howell and Geoff Lancaster

The proliferation of the internet and world wide web (WWW) in recent years has resulted in the creation of new social and marketing spaces, and a new form of interaction…

Abstract

Purpose

The proliferation of the internet and world wide web (WWW) in recent years has resulted in the creation of new social and marketing spaces, and a new form of interaction and identity formation. This paper aims to investigate this phenomenon.

Design/methodology/approach

Whilst cost benefits and profit derivation from the internet and other hypermedia mediated communication environments have been the focus of much research, the majority of these assessments have left many assumptions unarticulated. Questions of how contemporary communication content and interactivity is different from the singular “one‐to‐many” communication models have been avoided in this research. This paper investigates these deficiencies and goes on to suggest how academics and practitioners can realign their thinking in the light of these findings.

Findings

Computer mediated marketing environments provide organisations with a medium that can be used to deliver content in a variety of ways to consumers. This capability highlights the distinction between the information in marketing communication and the vehicle used to deliver the information: that is, content differs from communication.

Originality/value

The paper highlights how versatility of the internet as an instrument for mediated communication means that organisations can integrate different modalities of marketing communications into a strategy that combines on‐line and off‐line tactics to meet strategic objectives.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 42 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

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