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Article
Publication date: 28 October 2013

Hanna Gendel-Guterman and Shalom Levy

This study's aim is to apply the personal involvement approach to store brand products' buying proneness. With respect to the conflicting perspectives of narrow “latitudes…

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2807

Abstract

Purpose

This study's aim is to apply the personal involvement approach to store brand products' buying proneness. With respect to the conflicting perspectives of narrow “latitudes of acceptance” and “extensive search”, are presumed different levels and different types of personal involvement. The aim is to formulate a conceptual framework integrating three types of relevant consumer values: functional involvement, symbolic involvement and economic involvement, along with two well established mediating variables, and two consumer characteristics as exogenous variables.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected through a survey of 914 shoppers randomly recruited from 11 grocery stores. The study employs an exploratory factor analysis method following path analysis, using structural equation modeling (SEM).

Findings

The results show the significance of a multifaceted perspective of consumers' personal involvement in grocery shopping conditions. This perspective leads to the possibility of high personal involvement in grocery products shopping. Regarding consumers' store brand buying intention, personal involvement facets have only a marginal effect, while the direct substantial effects are derived from familiarity and value for money.

Practical implications

Retailers are advised to go beyond their efforts to persuade consumers that their products have economic value; they should encourage consumers to compare and evaluate the functional attributes of their store brands. For the social-symbolic consumer, they should employ different products' quality layers and different appealing brand names.

Originality/value

The originality of this study lies in the multifaceted alternative approach of consumers' personal involvement in grocery shopping processes, and the conceptual framework proposed to examine the effect of personal involvement facets on store brand buying intentions.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 30 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Article
Publication date: 28 March 2008

Pam Allis and Michael O'Driscoll

The paper seeks to examine whether spillover from “nonwork” to work contributes to individuals' well‐being.

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2977

Abstract

Purpose

The paper seeks to examine whether spillover from “nonwork” to work contributes to individuals' well‐being.

Design/methodology/approach

An online survey was administered to New Zealand local government employees. Positive (facilitation) and negative (conflict) spillover from two “nonwork” domains (family and personal benefit activities) to work were investigated. The survey also assessed psychological involvement (in work, family and personal benefit activities), time devoted to each domain, and self‐reported well‐being in each area.

Findings

Levels of nonwork‐to‐work facilitation were moderate, and significantly higher than nonwork‐to‐work conflict, and well‐being was moderately high (although greater for the family and personal benefit domains than for work). There were significant positive relationships between psychological involvement in the nonwork domains and levels of facilitation from these domains to work, and nonwork‐to‐work facilitation was associated with higher well‐being. Time invested in family and personal activities was not linked with greater nonwork‐to‐work conflict. Mediation analyses indicated that psychological involvement (in family and personal activities) was associated with increased facilitation, which in turn enhanced well‐being.

Practical implications

Engagement in family and personal benefit activities yields positive outcomes for individuals, in terms of their psychological well‐being and facilitation of work‐related outcomes. Encouragement to engage in these areas can therefore be beneficial for both individuals and their employing organizations.

Originality/value

The main contribution of this research is that involvement in personal benefit activities (as another component of the “nonwork” domain, in addition to family activities) can have positive outcomes for individuals, resulting in facilitation of work outcomes and positive well‐being.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Article
Publication date: 23 March 2010

Gerard P. Prendergast, Alex S.L. Tsang and Cherry N.W. Chan

Globalization and outsourcing have decoupled country of origin into the country of origin of manufacture (COM) and the country of origin of the brand (COB). This study…

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11510

Abstract

Purpose

Globalization and outsourcing have decoupled country of origin into the country of origin of manufacture (COM) and the country of origin of the brand (COB). This study seeks to extend the work of Gurhan‐Canli and Maheswaran and Lee et al. by investigating the interactive influence of COB and personal involvement with a product on purchase intention.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 168 young adults in Hong Kong were intercepted for mall interviews and presented with mock advertisements for personal computers ostensibly with brands originating in Japan and Korea. Their personal involvement with such products was measured using an instrument designed by Zaichkowsky, and their purchase intentions were self‐assessed.

Findings

COB was found to predict purchase intentions among consumers with a low level of personal involvement with computers, but not among consumers with a high level of personal involvement.

Research limitations/implications

First, to improve internal validity, the study involved a single product type and a sample limited to 15‐34 year olds. However, this improvement in internal validity places limitations on generalisability. Second, a median split was used to divide the subjects into low and high involvement groups. Third, only one dependent variable, purchase intention, was studied.

Practical implications

For marketers whose product is branded in a country with a favorable image, emphasizing the COB would be appropriate when communicating with low involvement consumers. Marketers whose product is branded in a country with a less favorable image ought to emphasize other peripheral cues when communicating with low involvement consumers.

Originality/value

By finding that COB has a significant impact on the purchase intentions of low involvement consumers, but not with those more highly involved, this research constitutes a small but important extension of the conclusions of Gurhan‐Canli and Maheswaran and Lee et al.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2009

Alex Wang

This paper aims to examine the effect of cross‐channel integration of an advertiser's television spot that invited viewers to play an online game and web site that…

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2399

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the effect of cross‐channel integration of an advertiser's television spot that invited viewers to play an online game and web site that featured the game on consumers' perceived media engagement and brand attitudes. An important factor, personal involvement is also to be examined.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 185 college students participate in an experimental study on participation and involvement. Participants fill out surveys and personal involvement is determined using various advertisements.

Findings

The results reveal that interaction effects are evident between cross‐channel integration of advertising and personal involvement on media engagement and brand attitudes.

Research limitations/implications

This study is limited, investigating only one brand, one product category, and two media that can feature advertising messages regarding cross‐channel integration. Future studies should investigate the cross‐channel integration effect on different segments of target consumers.

Practical implications

Advertisers should consider enhancing their media strategies. In particular, advertisers should manage a media plan that includes specific sets of contacts to enhance the effects of cross‐channel integration of advertising.

Originality/value

The paper helps substantiate the strategic value of cross‐channel integration of advertising on branding by assessing the value of cross‐channel integration of advertising.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 32 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2001

Abdullah H. Aldlaigan and Francis A. Buttle

This study reports an empirical test of two involvement scales: Zaichkowsky’s personal involve‐ment inventory (PII) and Kapferer and Laurent’s consumer involve‐ment…

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4359

Abstract

This study reports an empirical test of two involvement scales: Zaichkowsky’s personal involve‐ment inventory (PII) and Kapferer and Laurent’s consumer involve‐ment profile (CIP). The purpose of this study is to identify whether these two scales are applicable to financial services. Eight financial services are investigated: the use of a cheque book, overdraft facility, the use of Switch services, the use of a cash machine, savings account, investment services, mortgage services, and personal loan. The empirical findings show that the two scales indicate different levels of involvement in the eight financial services. The PII measure indicates that mortgage, investment and cash machine use are high involvement services. The use of savings account, personal loan, a chequebook, overdraft facility, and Switch services are found to be medium involvement services. The CIP shows that investment, mortgage, and savings accounts are rated as high involve‐ment services. Personal loans, overdraft facilities, Switch card, cash machine, and chequebook usage are in the middle range of involvement. Being a multidimen‐sional scale, the CIP provides more data about involvement. More investigation is needed in order to understand the links between consumer involvement in financial services and customer behaviour. The authors conclude with recom‐mendations for further research into consumer involvement in financial services and its effect on bank customer behaviour.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 19 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2001

Jung‐Im Seo, Jan M. Hathcote and Anne L. Sweaney

The expanding nature of the men’s casual apparel market represents a considerable economic growth area in the apparel industry. Of particular interest is the demand for…

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1793

Abstract

The expanding nature of the men’s casual apparel market represents a considerable economic growth area in the apparel industry. Of particular interest is the demand for casual clothing by college‐age men. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the influences of casualwear involvement (high, medium, low) on the purchasing behaviour of male students in relation to their shopping dimensions, personal characteristics, buying behaviour, shopping attributes and information sources. Data were collected using a questionnaire delivered by e‐mail to a systematically selected sample, with 176 male college students responding from 18 colleges in Georgia, USA. The results revealed that there were unique shopping patterns which differ according to casualwear involvement, indicating a deep interest in casualwear and appearance. Most male students had a medium to high casualwear involvement sum score; however, as age increased this score decreased. Both the personal and the market information sources indicated that customers with high involvement were more experienced than either the low or medium involvement groups. The medium involvement casualwear group was composed of consumers who were likely to make purchases during the sale season. The low involvement cohort was moderate casualwear buyers in terms of volume and purchased expensive casualwear. This study shows that classifying male college students by involvement can be helpful in marketing to this group. Apparel marketers are well advised to focus on this neglected cohort of male casualwear consumers.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

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Article
Publication date: 17 April 2009

Her‐Sen Doong and Hui‐Chih Wang

This paper aims to argue that individuals' use of personal knowledge management systems (PKMS) differs significantly as a result of their underlying innovativeness and…

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1089

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to argue that individuals' use of personal knowledge management systems (PKMS) differs significantly as a result of their underlying innovativeness and involvement traits. Based on the literature, this paper seeks to propose that while more involved users utilise PKMS more frequently, more‐innovative users utilise more functions of PKMS.

Design/methodology/approach

A field survey was conducted to collect data. Correlation techniques and regression analysis were used to test the proposed relationship between constructs.

Findings

The findings indicated that while both traits were significantly associated with PKMS usage behaviours, users' involvement was the primary predictor of PKMS use frequency, while users' innovativeness predominated in the prediction of the number of PKMS functions they used. That is, although more involved users may use fewer functions compared with more innovative users, they are more likely to become long‐term supporters of PKMS because their use frequency is significantly higher than that of more innovative users.

Practical implications

The paper informs scholars and managers that using a single approach – that is, only using frequency or the number of functions used – to evaluate the performance of a PKMS may lead to a biased result.

Originality/value

After half a century of development of information technology, this paper addresses the importance of taking a step further and verifying the behaviours related to the use of PKMS with different approaches, such as use frequency and the number of functions used. In particular, the paper presents a pioneering piece of research in the information systems discipline, revealing that individuals' underlying innovativeness and involvement contribute to different PKMS use behaviours.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 33 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

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Article
Publication date: 5 October 2012

Marietta Peytcheva and Peter R. Gillett

The purpose of this paper is to investigate practicing auditors' beliefs regarding the effect of prior involvement on the occurrence of quality threatening behaviour (QTB…

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2669

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate practicing auditors' beliefs regarding the effect of prior involvement on the occurrence of quality threatening behaviour (QTB) during an audit. The authors examine the extent to which auditors' beliefs about QTB are consistent with the theoretical framework of Kanodia et al., according to which prior involvement in audit work would increase the likelihood of auditors suppressing evidence inconsistent with earlier audit decisions.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conduct an experiment in which auditors assess the likelihood of perceived reputation threats associated with encountering disconfirming evidence late in the audit, and the likelihood that such evidence will be suppressed.

Findings

Auditors participating in the study believe that prior involvement will induce a perception of personal reputation threats in an auditor encountering evidence inconsistent with the conclusions of earlier audit work. Participants perceive an auditor with prior involvement in the audit work to be more likely to suppress audit evidence than an auditor with no prior involvement; this effect is largely explained by the personal reputation threats believed to be induced by prior involvement.

Research limitations/implications

The findings provide important information, from the perspective of practicing auditors, about a situational antecedent of QTB that is present on most audit engagements. Prior involvement is perceived by auditors to induce a conflict of interest in reporting troublesome evidence uncovered late in the audit. These perceptions suggest it is important to raise reviewers' awareness of the possibility of undesirable behavior in such situations. Potential limitations of the study relate to generalizability of the results under different levels of misstatement risk and under different environments in audit practice. Also, the authors do not measure auditors' actual behaviour, but their assessment of hypothetical situations and beliefs about others' actions. Future research can examine actual auditor behaviour in the presence of prior involvement.

Originality/value

The paper provides evidence on auditors' beliefs about the effects on QTB of prior involvement, a factor that has not been previously studied in this line of research. The authors show that auditors' beliefs about QTB are consistent with Kanodia et al.'s theoretical framework. The study is the first to measure auditors' assessments of perceived reputation threats and to show their mediating effect on the predicted behavior of audit professionals.

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Article
Publication date: 12 June 2017

Fran Walsh and Anna Tickle

The purpose of this paper is to explore how those engaged in service user involvement (SUI) initiatives perceive involvement and recovery; whether involvement is related…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how those engaged in service user involvement (SUI) initiatives perceive involvement and recovery; whether involvement is related to their recovery process and, if so, how.

Design/methodology/approach

An exploratory qualitative method, social constructionist grounded theory, was adopted throughout the research process. Nine semi-structured interviews were undertaken with participants who self-defined as having current or previous mental health problems and who were engaged in SUI initiatives.

Findings

Most participants identified explicit links between their own experiences of SUI and recovery. These links represented a connection between the characteristics they perceived to be inherent to involvement and their personal definitions of recovery. In contrast, experiences of consultation and involvement as patient service users was limited and identified as an area for improvement. The core of the tentative grounded theory constructed suggests that individuals found in involvement elements which were concordant with and supported their own definitions of recovery and which were not apparent in their experiences as patients.

Research limitations/implications

The small sample and narrow constituency of participants limit the nature of the claims made by the study.

Practical implications

This study highlights the value of involvement in promoting recovery and indicates the merit of promoting meaningful involvement across the spectrum of the service user experience.

Originality/value

This study offers a unique contribution to the current literature, highlighting the links made between involvement and personal recovery.

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2003

Yungwook Kim

As moderators of the health campaign process, involvement is divided into enduring and situational involvement. Based on the review of interdisciplinary literatures, a new…

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2613

Abstract

As moderators of the health campaign process, involvement is divided into enduring and situational involvement. Based on the review of interdisciplinary literatures, a new health campaign model and optimal strategies are proposed. The new model has two dimensions (enduring and situational involvement) and four strategies: an affect‐evoking, an information‐oriented, a cue‐emphasizing, and a balanced‐argument strategy. For the empirical research, a 262 experiment with 143 undergraduate students using four different advertisements was conducted. Generally, the moderating effects of both enduring and situational involvement were supported. Regardless of some deviations from the proposed model, optimal strategies fit into the designated involvement level. Public relations practitioners will be able to choose the optimal message strategy after identifying the characteristic of targeted publics for health‐related campaigns.

Details

Corporate Communications: An International Journal, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-3289

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