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Article
Publication date: 13 May 2014

Bruce Perrott

The purpose of this article is to build on the original Dunphy, Griffiths and Benn (2007) model by proposing a new model of organisational sustainability which includes…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to build on the original Dunphy, Griffiths and Benn (2007) model by proposing a new model of organisational sustainability which includes the economic dimension. There is a growing level of interest by senior executives in the role and potential impact that sustainability will have on their organisation’s future strategy and structure. Although management is keenly aware that sustainability is important in their future planning, there is much uncertainty about what level of involvement and commitment they should make towards sustainability endeavours.

Design/methodology/approach

This article reviews the existing organisational sustainability change model while building a case to have the important economic strand added to the original change dimensions relating to the human and the environmental strands.

Findings

This conceptual paper builds on previous work of sustainability organisational change theorists to produce an enhanced sustainability change model thus proposing a more comprehensive and integrated sustainability stage model that can guide managers in their quest to evolve effective and more sustainable organisations.

Originality/value

This is a conceptual paper that builds on previous work of sustainability organisational change theorists to introduce an enhanced sustainability change model that includes the important economic dimension to the widely accepted social and environmental dimensions, thus proposing a comprehensive and integrated sustainability stage model that can guide managers in their quest to evolve effective and more sustainable organisations.

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Article
Publication date: 20 April 2020

Olufunke Olufunmi Oladimeji, Heather Keathley-Herring and Jennifer A. Cross

This study investigates system dynamics (SD) applications in performance measurement (PM) research and practice. A bibliometric analysis was conducted to investigate the…

Abstract

Purpose

This study investigates system dynamics (SD) applications in performance measurement (PM) research and practice. A bibliometric analysis was conducted to investigate the maturity of this research area and identify opportunities for development.

Design/methodology/approach

A systematic literature review (SLR) was conducted to provide a comprehensive and rigorous review of the existing literature. The search was conducted on 10 platforms identifying 97 publications, which were evaluated using bibliometric analysis.

Findings

The analysis revealed that applications of SD are most commonly used in the PM system design phase to model organisational performance. In addition, the bibliometric results showed a highly dispersed author set, with most studies using exploratory methods, suggesting that the research is in a relatively early stage of development. The results also showed that over 50 per cent of the causal models were not validated, emphasizing an important methodological gap in this research area.

Research limitations/implications

This SLR is limited to indexed publications on 10 platforms, the search strategy was relatively precise and only available papers in English language were used for the literature review.

Practical implications

PM systems supported by SD can help managers understand and improve organisational behaviours by addressing dynamic complexities and relationship between variables. This study evaluates the maturity of this research area including information about the current development of this area and opportunities to build on existing knowledge.

Originality/value

This study identifies how SD approaches are applied to PM and highlights areas that require further research consideration. This paper is the first of two publications to result from this study and focuses on evaluating the current state of this research area.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. 69 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

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Article
Publication date: 13 July 2015

Eleni Papadonikolaki, Ruben Vrijhoef and Hans Wamelink

The purpose of this paper is to propose a methodology to integrate the construction Supply Chain (SC) through the application of Building Information Modeling (BIM) and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose a methodology to integrate the construction Supply Chain (SC) through the application of Building Information Modeling (BIM) and Supply Chain Management (SCM). It features a renovation case as a proof-of-concept.

Design/methodology/approach

After analyzing the relevant gaps in the literature, the research followed a modeling approach. The proposed model merged product-, process- and organizational models in a graph-based model to represent and analyze a BIM-based SCM project.

Findings

Presently, the information flows of the construction SC are vague. BIM is an aspiring integrator of information flows for construction. The proposed model for SC integration with BIM, offers an approach to identify the project complexities in relation to organizational structures, roles and interactions and integrate the industry.

Practical implications

Currently BIM-enabled SCM is not very widely applied in the industry. However, the authors report the increasing interest of most construction stakeholders to engage in the application of the two, after acknowledging the benefits from the individual approaches. Since this combination is quite rare, the research uses a retrospective real-world case study of a SC project with an imaginary application of BIM.

Originality/value

Thus far, there is no formal model to represent the interactions of the SC actors along with BIM. The unique combination of a product and a process model, i.e. BIM, with an organizational model aims at integrating the information flows of the SC. The proposed model aims at analyzing and supporting the BIM-enabled SCM in Architecture Engineering and Construction.

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Book part
Publication date: 28 July 2014

Bernd Lorenz Walter

The chapter develops a phase model of strategic planning in integrated corporate social responsibility (CSR) communication by presenting CSR as a mindset in communication…

Abstract

Purpose

The chapter develops a phase model of strategic planning in integrated corporate social responsibility (CSR) communication by presenting CSR as a mindset in communication processes.

Design/methodology/approach

The chapter provides rationales for establishing a new phase model of strategic planning in CSR communication by adapting existing models of strategic communications. In this context, the main focus is on the need to involve stakeholders in CSR communication processes (Morsing & Schultz, 2006).

Findings

The chapter argues that in the sense of CSR communication, stakeholders should be involved in the strategic planning process from the beginning, with respect to the issues that the corporation and targeted stakeholder groups have in common.

Research limitations/implications

The chapter concentrates on selected key aspects of CSR and CSR communication. In particular the aspects such as reputation, credibility, ethical alignment and stakeholder involvement are considered as prerequisites for understanding the construction of the phase model.

Practical implications

This chapter provides practical implications for developing communication concepts in CSR communication in daily business practice.

Originality/value

This chapter facilitates a comprehensive understanding of strategic CSR communication as part of CSR reflected in the development processes of communication concepts.

Details

Communicating Corporate Social Responsibility: Perspectives and Practice
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-796-2

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 25 June 2019

Falk Johannes Behmer and Roland Jochem

Quality managers today require a holistic, overreaching view on the organization and its goals in order to plan the quality management organization (QMO) effectively. The…

Abstract

Purpose

Quality managers today require a holistic, overreaching view on the organization and its goals in order to plan the quality management organization (QMO) effectively. The purpose of this paper is to present the concept of a web application that aims to support quality managers in organizational planning tasks. The basis for the implementation is a previously developed planning method that builds on Product and Technology Roadmapping as well as Quality Function Deployment. It supports the QMO’s strategic development in line with the organization’s overall strategy.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on previous research that systematically identified the requirements toward a suitable planning method and a consecutively designed framework, a web application was developed. This process followed agile software development approaches, including test-driven iteration cycles and validation through a case-based user trial.

Findings

Standardized quality criteria for software development together with identified requirements for a suitable planning method provided a specified guideline to develop a web application. This application enables quality managers to effectively deploy the previously developed planning method. It proved successful in an initial field trial and creates a basis for integrated, computer-aided QMO planning.

Originality/value

With an integrated planning method that was implemented through a web application, quality managers could be effectively supported in developing the QMO in line with the overall strategy. As organizational planning tasks are reoccurring but not day-to-day business, moderated workshops that use the web application as a guiding tool and enable quality managers to focus on delivering information inputs appear to be a highly promising approach.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 26 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 22 June 2012

Rachel Itabashi‐Campbell, Julia Gluesing and Sheri Perelli

The purpose of this paper is to provide empirical evidence of engineering knowledge creation in the context of product failure management, thereby extending knowledge…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide empirical evidence of engineering knowledge creation in the context of product failure management, thereby extending knowledge about organizational learning and mindfulness to a largely unexplored context. The study addresses a gap in the literature by illustrating “engineering epistemology” as a critical knowledge asset that gives rise to superior problem solving – and potentially – superior business performance.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted qualitative research based on phenomenological interviews with product engineers to generate a grounded theory about organizational knowledge creation. Rigorous analysis of narratives detailing the “lived lives” of problem solvers relied on a research protocol recommended by Corbin and Strauss.

Findings

The findings show that engineers' real‐world problem‐solving practices mirror Nonaka and Takeuchi's five phases of knowledge creation and the three stages of sensemaking in enactment theory, the genesis of Weick's notion of mindfulness. A synthesized model illustrates how a five‐step problem‐solving process facilitated by environmental conditions resulting in organizational learning is influenced by an “engineering epistemology”.

Research limitations/implications

The sample was limited to engineers based primarily in the US Midwest. While the authors' methodology (grounded theory) was appropriate for theory generation, the results invite quantitative testing involving a larger and more diversified sample of engineers.

Practical implications

The paper highlights the social aspects of engineering problem solving that firms can optimize for effective problem investigation and higher organizational learning.

Originality/value

The paper conceptualizes problem‐solving teamwork as epistemic collaboration, with the often un‐optimized potential of generating organizational learning. It is, to the authors' knowledge, the first research to concentrate on modeling the dynamics of knowledge creation in an engineering problem‐solving context.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 29 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1988

Andrew Chadwick

The introduction to this series (Vol 6/No 8, August 1988) explained the concept of organisational modelling and the three key processes by which it is made up. Here we…

Abstract

The introduction to this series (Vol 6/No 8, August 1988) explained the concept of organisational modelling and the three key processes by which it is made up. Here we explain the techniques for the extraction of information from the subject company in the analytical modelling stage, followed by a brief examination of the products of the synthetic and numerical modelling phases. The organisational modelling flowchart (Figure 1) will be used as an agenda for this discussion.

Details

Facilities, vol. 6 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2003

Marc J. Schniederjans and Gyu C. Kim

The primary objective of an enterprise resource planning (ERP) system is to help integrate an organization's business operations and processes effectively and efficiently…

Abstract

The primary objective of an enterprise resource planning (ERP) system is to help integrate an organization's business operations and processes effectively and efficiently. Not all firms have been successful in their ERP implementations and to that end research has helped to identify many factors that might be critical to a successful implementation. Such factors as the use of business process reengineering (BPR), and establishing a total quality management (TQM) culture have all shown to play important roles in ERP implementation. The focus of this survey research on US electronic manufacturing firms is to identify successful integration sequences of TQM and BPR with ERP. The findings reveal that both the sequence of implementation and the strategies selected to initiate ERP systems can significantly impact business performance successfulness.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 6 August 2018

Forrest Briscoe and Sean Safford

This paper develops an argument about how contentious changes unfold in organizational fields, focusing on the role of uncertainty – and the networks people use to address…

Abstract

This paper develops an argument about how contentious changes unfold in organizational fields, focusing on the role of uncertainty – and the networks people use to address uncertainty. We propose that as controversial practice gains traction and spreads, the nature of uncertainty facing organizational decision makers also evolves. This dynamic has important implications for how different actors and networks can influence change. We illustrate our argument with a mixed-methods case study on the diffusion of domestic partner benefits across US Fortune 500 companies. Our findings shed light on how – and when – social activists, corporate elites, and middle managers can influence the corporate decision-making process.

Details

Social Movements, Stakeholders and Non-Market Strategy
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-349-2

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 30 June 2016

Charn P. McAllister and Gerald R. Ferris

Although the concept of duty has a historic and philosophical foundations dating back to Aristotle, there is very little theory and research in this area of scientific…

Abstract

Although the concept of duty has a historic and philosophical foundations dating back to Aristotle, there is very little theory and research in this area of scientific inquiry. In an effort to address this lack of scholarship, a theoretical foundation and a model are presented that clearly delineate the construct of duty, and the nature of its development within an individual-organization relationship. Using social exchange theory and the three-component model of organizational commitment as the conceptual foundations, the proposed duty development model explains the individual-level antecedents and the phases of commitment that individuals may progress through during their tenure in an organization. The various types of exchanges and transactions inherent in the social exchange theory provide the basis for each phase of commitment individuals experience. It is proposed that certain antecedents make individuals more likely to form a sense of duty toward an organization, but the development of this type of relationship requires an organization to focus on commitment building efforts, such as perceived organizational support and organizational culture. Contributions to theory and research, organizational implications, and directions for future research are discussed.

Details

Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-263-7

Keywords

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