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Article
Publication date: 26 November 2020

Aliye Emirali, Rachel O'Rourke and Caroline Friendship

This paper explores absconding from a new perspective. Literature has tended to focus on the risk factors linked with absconding. This paper aims to consider desistance…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper explores absconding from a new perspective. Literature has tended to focus on the risk factors linked with absconding. This paper aims to consider desistance factors for absconding for prisoners at higher risk of absconding in open prisons.

Design/methodology/approach

Stage 1 used logistic regression to identify factors associated with increased risk of absconding. Stage 2 identified new receptions with increased risk and used thematic analysis to analyse interviews with prisoners that did not abscond after three months.

Findings

Stage 1 found that the total number of previous offences predicted absconding. Stage 2 found three themes linked to desistance in absconding: “support”, “ownership” and “sense of self”.

Practical implications

This study highlights the importance of ensuring prisoners in open prisons are offered the appropriate emotional and practical support. It also identifies the importance of hope amongst prisoners in open conditions. Future research should further explore this idea in more depth.

Originality/value

Previous literature has looked at absconding from a risk factor perspective. This research identifies the desistance factors associated with absconding for individuals who have been identified as high risk of absconding. Improvements in factors associated with desistance from absconding may support a reduction in absconding from open prisons.

Details

The Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-8794

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Book part
Publication date: 9 April 2021

Umesh Chandra Pandey

United Nation’s Standard Minimum Rules for Treatment of Prisoners, popularly known as Nelson Mandela Rules categorically advocates for the Prison Education and its…

Abstract

United Nation’s Standard Minimum Rules for Treatment of Prisoners, popularly known as Nelson Mandela Rules categorically advocates for the Prison Education and its integration with the educational system of the country. Moreover, principles for the treatment of prisoners, adopted by United Nation in 1990, guarantee that prisoners retain the human rights and fundamental freedoms set out in Universal Declaration of Human Rights, which includes right to take part in education also. However, there is little sensitization about the rights of prisoners in many countries. The issue has gained prominence as several international organizations have now raised concern on these matters.

Education of jail inmates has attracted the attention of Open and Distance Learning (ODL) systems in India. Among all the ODL institutions, Indira Gandhi National Open University (IGNOU) has been the major role player. Right from its first initiative to have a special study center in Tihar Jail in 1994, IGNOU’s network for jail inmates has undergone significant expansion. The university has now strong presence in the prisons. Under a special collaborative arrangement with Ministry of Home Affairs, IGNOU has started free education to jail inmates from 2010. This chapter gives a glimpse about the model being followed by IGNOU for providing education inside prisons, highlights its good practices, gaps in its functioning and makes recommendations for further strengthening of this network.

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Book part
Publication date: 10 February 2012

Keramet Ann Reiter

Supermaxes across the United States detain thousands in long-term solitary confinement, under conditions of extreme sensory deprivation. Almost every state built a…

Abstract

Supermaxes across the United States detain thousands in long-term solitary confinement, under conditions of extreme sensory deprivation. Almost every state built a supermax between the late 1980s and the late 1990s. This chapter examines the role of federal prisoners’ rights litigation in the 1960s and 1970s in shaping the prisons, especially supermaxes, built in the 1980s and 1990s in the United States. This chapter uses a systematic analysis of federal court case law, as well as archival research and oral history interviews with key informants, including lawyers, experts, and correctional administrators, to explore the relationship between federal court litigation and prison building and designing. This chapter argues that federal conditions of confinement litigation in the 1960s and 1970s (1) had a direct role in shaping the supermax institutions built in the subsequent decades and (2) contributed to the resistance of these institutions to constitutional challenges. The history of litigation around supermaxes is an important and as-yet-unexplored aspect of the development of Eighth Amendment jurisprudence in the United States over the last half century.

Details

Studies in Law, Politics, and Society
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-622-5

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Article
Publication date: 2 April 2020

Ferid Azemi

This study aims to focus on understanding the prison environment, inmates’ behavior and perceptions of the prison environment, analyzing the degree of awareness…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to focus on understanding the prison environment, inmates’ behavior and perceptions of the prison environment, analyzing the degree of awareness, rehabilitation and the programs that apply to prisons in both countries. It is assumed that the data that emerge from this research will contribute to a better understanding of the prisoner’s world of their perception about the prison environment in Kosovo and Finland. The study focused on inmates’ perception about the prison environment and their attitudes toward their sentences.

Design/methodology/approach

Qualitative study through in-depth interviews.

Findings

The results of this study indicated that inmates in Kosovo perceived the prison environment in a very negative light. The main reasons for this were the dissatisfaction with their status of being inmates and also lack of an appropriate classification of inmates. However, even though inmates in Finland perceived prison environment in a positive light, they still think that more educative programs are needed.

Practical implications

The results of this study indicated that Kosovo Correctional Service should implement more rehabilitative programs and improve its classification system. Criminal Sanction Agency in Finland as per results should increase efforts for implementation of new programs and aftercare action plans.

Originality/value

To the best of the author’s knowledge, it is the first research on inmates in two countries Kosovo and Finland, and this added new knowledge to the existing information about the prison environment in Kosovo and Finland. The results of this research gave an idea to respective institutions to add new rehabilitative and aftercare programs.

Details

Journal of Criminological Research, Policy and Practice, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-3841

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2004

Azrini Wahidin and Dot Moss

This article discusses themes emerging from two independent research projects. In order to understand how women negotiate and transgress time frames, we critically explore…

Abstract

This article discusses themes emerging from two independent research projects. In order to understand how women negotiate and transgress time frames, we critically explore and make visible the strategies used by two very different groups, who are placed in different locales and time orderings. The first group are women in later life and in prison and the second group, women students in higher education. It is by inserting the words of women into debates on time, agency and space that we are able to make visible the strategies that women harness in order to do, make and reclaim time. Within this article we discuss the different research strategies employed by the authors. First, we look at conceptualisations of time and gender. Then we discuss how these respectively inform our research. Azrini Wahidin discusses the role and meaning of time in relation to how female elders in prison come to understand and simultaneously negotiate coercive time use in prison and the passing of time on the outside. She focuses on how the strictures of disciplinary time and the lack of choice create innovative ways of negotiating and resisting the disciplining of institution time in prison. Dot Moss discusses the everyday practice and experience of women students, who, in contrast, have relative freedom to time‐structure their day. She focuses on the ways in which space and time to study are both socially and personally constructed out of other’s time and time for other things (Davies 1990). Common themes arising in relation to the analysis of gender and time are then discussed.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 24 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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Book part
Publication date: 10 October 2014

Maggy Lee and K. Joe Laidler

This chapter aims to examine the ways in which gender has featured in Hong Kong’s prison system from its colonial origins to its contemporary form as a politically…

Abstract

Purpose

This chapter aims to examine the ways in which gender has featured in Hong Kong’s prison system from its colonial origins to its contemporary form as a politically autonomous region of China. We conclude with a discussion on the reasons for these recent trends of imprisonment.

Design/methodology/approach

We draw from the concepts of patriarchy and colonialism to examine how gender has operated and shaped Hong Kong’s prison system. Our analysis is based on historical and contemporary government reports and other documents and secondary data.

Findings

Similar to other locales around the world, Hong Kong’s prison system was designed for and by men in its early colonial days, as expected given that most prisoners were male. Although a few prison administrators attempted to provide some programs for women and voiced concern over the conditions of women’s imprisonment to colonial authorities during the latter part of the 1800s, it was not until the 1930s that the first female prison was established. Since then, Hong Kong prison authorities have faced the challenge of a phenomenal and rapid growth in women’s imprisonment, which resulted in a historical reversal of shifting male prisoners to alternate accommodation to make room for their female counterparts.

Originality/value

This study is among the few which have examined how gender operates in the context of imprisonment in a colonial and postcolonial context. This chapter does this by examining how colonial authorities managed competing political debates about the purpose of punishment and cultural understandings of race and difference, and the limited recognition of gender and difference. It also examines how, in postcolonial Hong Kong, authorities have placed gender center stage and the reasons for this in coping and dealing with the growth in women’s imprisonment.

Details

Punishment and Incarceration: A Global Perspective
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-907-2

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Article
Publication date: 5 December 2016

Christopher Muzavazi

The purpose of this paper is to present a preliminary study exploring the perception of prison officers in England and Wales regarding violence in their workplace.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a preliminary study exploring the perception of prison officers in England and Wales regarding violence in their workplace.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were gathered through questionnaires administered to 152 of Her Majesty’s Prison establishments throughout England and Wales, ranging from high secure to open prisons where officers are affiliated to the Prison Officers Association. In total, 45 officers responded, seven from women’s prisons and the remainder from male adult and youth prisons. In addition, descriptive data from the Ministry of Justice statistical data set on incidents of violence are incorporated where possible.

Findings

Results indicated that violence, both prisoner on staff and prisoner-to-prisoner, is a major concern among prison officers, across all prison categories. The prison officers who took part considered there to be an absence of what they perceived to be serious measures to prevent and manage violence. Officers view the prison disciplinary system as ineffective, with reluctance for external charges to be considered against prisoners committing acts of violence within the prison.

Research limitations/implications

The research is limited by a lack of external measures being obtained (e.g. observation of aggressive incidents) and the fact that the participants were self-selecting, with only a small proportion of respondents. However, it suggests a need for more detailed research into prison violence, one that integrates the views of prison staff as well as prisoners, with the former lacking in the research base to date. It also indicates a need for more focussed action from management, staff representatives and reform lobbies to explore collectively how to prevent violence in prison. Only by adopting a multidisciplinary and multifaceted approach can a comprehensive attempt at management be achieved.

Practical implications

Prison violence has a negative impact on correctional settings and their mission to provide a safe working environment for staff and safe environment for prisoners. Consequently, a focussed management approach on the problem is required, one that captures the view of a range of staff and prisoners. Prisoner’s violent conduct, whether assault on staff or peers, constitutes further criminal conduct. This has to be addressed through formal processes such as prison reports, police charges and potential prosecution. The latter has been under-applied. Determining the barriers to pursuing police charges and possible prosecution would be valuable to pursue. Violence against staff needs to be more thoroughly understood and not considered solely as an occupational hazard, but as a means of safe-guarding both staff and prisoners.

Originality/value

This study is the first that has sought to incorporate prison workforce perception on the problem of escalating levels of prison violence, using a sample from a wide set of prison environments.

Details

Journal of Criminological Research, Policy and Practice, vol. 2 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-3841

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2009

Phil Reed, Yousef Alenazi and Fenella Potterton

Prisoners from two institutions (a low security and a high security prison) were studied to explore the coping strategies used in stressful situations, and the…

Abstract

Prisoners from two institutions (a low security and a high security prison) were studied to explore the coping strategies used in stressful situations, and the relationship between prison sentence length and the coping strategies employed. Prisoners completed the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire, and the Ways of Coping Scale. Coping strategies that focused on emotions, rather than on the source problem, were found to be most often employed. Shorter‐term prisoners adopted problem‐focused strategies more than longer‐term prisoners, while longer‐term prisoners adopted emotion‐focused strategies more than shorter‐term prisoners. These results are discussed with reference to the influence of the environment on coping strategy.

Details

International Journal of Prisoner Health, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-9200

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2006

Andrew Gray, Sarah Pearce and Linda Marks

In the context of the transfer of the responsibility for prison health from the Prison Service to the National Health Service, a survey of doctors working in prisons

Abstract

In the context of the transfer of the responsibility for prison health from the Prison Service to the National Health Service, a survey of doctors working in prisons reveals doctors’ own high priorities for training in the distinct patient contexts found in prison as well as in certain clinical conditions. The analysis identifies exclusive competences required only for doctors working in prisons and special interest competences that although applicable to practice in the community are particular strengths of doctors working in prisons because of the prevalence of conditions they are required to address.

Details

International Journal of Prisoner Health, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-9200

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

Azrini Wahidin and Jason Powell

Drawing from Foucault’s methodological terms of archaeology and genealogy this article critically engages with understanding the inter‐relationship between old age and…

Abstract

Drawing from Foucault’s methodological terms of archaeology and genealogy this article critically engages with understanding the inter‐relationship between old age and prison life.We draw out the relevance of a Foucauldian paradigm for investigating how penal discourses and actual prisoners experiences exemplify issues of power, knowledge and surveillance in institutional settings. We draw out how violence impinges on the lives of older people in prisons by pointing out the implications of such experiences for both a critical ontology and epistemology of ageing. It is by transgressing the boundaries of the conventional understanding of the prison and by casting a critical gaze that will gain greater understanding of how elder abuse in secure settings goes unregulated.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 24 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

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