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Article
Publication date: 26 November 2020

Aliye Emirali, Rachel O'Rourke and Caroline Friendship

This paper explores absconding from a new perspective. Literature has tended to focus on the risk factors linked with absconding. This paper aims to consider desistance…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper explores absconding from a new perspective. Literature has tended to focus on the risk factors linked with absconding. This paper aims to consider desistance factors for absconding for prisoners at higher risk of absconding in open prisons.

Design/methodology/approach

Stage 1 used logistic regression to identify factors associated with increased risk of absconding. Stage 2 identified new receptions with increased risk and used thematic analysis to analyse interviews with prisoners that did not abscond after three months.

Findings

Stage 1 found that the total number of previous offences predicted absconding. Stage 2 found three themes linked to desistance in absconding: “support”, “ownership” and “sense of self”.

Practical implications

This study highlights the importance of ensuring prisoners in open prisons are offered the appropriate emotional and practical support. It also identifies the importance of hope amongst prisoners in open conditions. Future research should further explore this idea in more depth.

Originality/value

Previous literature has looked at absconding from a risk factor perspective. This research identifies the desistance factors associated with absconding for individuals who have been identified as high risk of absconding. Improvements in factors associated with desistance from absconding may support a reduction in absconding from open prisons.

Details

The Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-8794

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 16 November 2012

Dave Hearn, David Ndegwa, Philip Norman, Natalie Hammond and Eddie Chaplin

Leave is an important part of life for both patients and clinicians in secure mental health and learning disability settings. Patients breaching leave conditions (i.e…

Abstract

Purpose

Leave is an important part of life for both patients and clinicians in secure mental health and learning disability settings. Patients breaching leave conditions (i.e. absconding or failing to return) represent a small percentage of leave episodes; however when incidents occur there can be far reaching negative outcomes for potential victims, the patient and the service. The purpose of this paper is to devise a risk assessment specifically for leave decision making based on the literature available.

Design/methodology/approach

Using the approach followed in the violence risk assessment field, a literature review was carried out of papers relating to absconding. The results were used to develop the leave/abscond risk assessment (LARA).

Findings

There are a number of problems with the available literature: there is a dearth of research, definitions for absconding are varied (often including escape) making comparisons difficult and much of the literature focuses on psychiatric acute wards making it difficult to translate into secure environments. Characteristics of absconders vary and are not idiosyncratic enough from which to develop a risk assessment. Socio‐environmental factors are perhaps more important and so the LARA was devised around assessment of these.

Research limitations/implications

The limitations of this paper are clear: a risk assessment tool is proposed that has not been evaluated or validated in any way. The authors feel that the process warrants publication and invite readers to use the tool for clinical and/or research purposes.

Originality/value

The LARA is proposed as a specific leave‐decision‐making risk assessment tool for teams working in secure environments.

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, vol. 6 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1282

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2007

Trisha Nichols

In the present climate of risk assessment and management, the risk posed by the mentally disordered offender might be considered central to the role of mental health…

Abstract

In the present climate of risk assessment and management, the risk posed by the mentally disordered offender might be considered central to the role of mental health professionals working with this population. To discipline risk is a challenge that involves making something uncertain somehow quantifiable, so that decisions about the short‐longer‐term future of another individual can be made and justified (Rose, 1998). Although unauthorised patient absence from secure hospitals in the UK is an infrequent phenomenon, there are often prominent repercussions, perpetuated by negative media coverage, often resulting in responses from the highest political level. This article will attempt to highlight known statistics on absconsion from secure hospitals, including frequency and consequences, and impact of negative media coverage and various reviews, inquiries and proposed recommendations, which have resulted in the proposed reforms of the Mental Health Act 1983. Finally, the article will outline the work conducted by the social work department at Chadwick Lodge and Eaglestone View (medium secure hospitals) in the development of an 'absconsion pack'. This development provides an example of safe practice through its use of collaborative inter‐professional and multidisciplinary team working, resulting in a procedure that should reduce the risks in the event of an absconsion from a medium secure hospital. The wider implications of this work will be discussed.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 14 December 2020

Beth Marsden

This paper draws on the archival records of the Victorian Education Department, literature produced by the governing authority of Tally Ho (the Central Mission), and…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper draws on the archival records of the Victorian Education Department, literature produced by the governing authority of Tally Ho (the Central Mission), and newspaper reports produced in the mid-20th century about school and education at Tally Ho. This paper also draws on material from the Victorian Aborigines Welfare Board and the Northern Territory Department of Welfare, as well as two historical key government inquiries into the institutionalisation of children.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper uses Tally Ho Boys’ Training Farm as a case study to examine the intersection of welfare systems, justice systems and schooling and education for Aboriginal children in institutions like Tally Ho in the mid-20th century. Further, it provides perspectives on how institutions such as Tally Ho were utilised by governments in Victoria and the Northern Territory to pursue different agendas – sometimes educational – particular to Aboriginal children. This paper also explores how histories can be reconstructed when archives are missing or silent about histories of Aboriginal childhood.

Findings

This paper demonstrates how governments used Tally Ho to control and govern the lives of Aboriginal children. By drawing together archives from a range of bodies and authorities who controlled legislation and policies, this paper contributes new understandings about the role of institutions in Victoria to the assimilation policies of Victoria and the Northern Territory in the mid-20th century.

Originality/value

Scholarship on the institutionalisation of children in the post-war era in Victoria, including the ways that schooling and justice systems were experienced by children living in care, has failed to fully engage with the experiences of Aboriginal children. Historians have given limited attention to the experiences of Aboriginal children living in institutions off Aboriginal reserves in Victoria. There has been limited historical scholarship examining the experiences of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children at Tally Ho. This paper broadens our understandings about how Aboriginal children encountered institutionalisation in Victoria.

Details

History of Education Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0819-8691

Keywords

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Expert briefing
Publication date: 30 July 2018

Asylum policies.

Details

DOI: 10.1108/OXAN-DB236449

ISSN: 2633-304X

Keywords

Geographic
Topical
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Article
Publication date: 2 September 2014

Sachin Patel

The purpose of this paper is to appraise local absent without leave/missing persons policy in use across the nine NHS mental health trusts providing services across the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to appraise local absent without leave/missing persons policy in use across the nine NHS mental health trusts providing services across the Greater London region.

Design/methodology/approach

A review of the literature on best practice management was conducted, evidence collated and an appraisal tool produced. This tool was used to systematically appraise individual policies.

Findings

Despite some core consistency in policy, there was some notable variability in guidance. Novel and unique approaches to management were also identified.

Research limitations/implications

It is recognised that policies often arise from pragmatic approaches using local multi-agency agreements and therefore some variability across London was expected. It is also recognised that the audit tool produced is unvalidated but does reflect the best available evidence.

Practical implications

The authors have shown policy variability in the management of what is a common psychiatric problem across a relatively homogenous population. Standardisation of policy is likely to improve the efficiency in managing these incidents as well as encourage sharing of innovative practice. The authors also illustrate practical implications for local policy benchmarking in the absence of clearly defined national standards.

Originality/value

This study has shown the variability of policy in managing a common problem faced on psychiatric wards. It also highlights issues related to policy development on a local and regional level.

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2006

Malcolm Rae

Abstract

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2000

Phillip Vaughan

There is not only an absence of guidelines for the development of medium and low secure units but also confusion over the definitions of these types of provision.

Abstract

There is not only an absence of guidelines for the development of medium and low secure units but also confusion over the definitions of these types of provision.

Details

The British Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6646

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Article
Publication date: 10 September 2018

Cosmas Ikegwuruka

Liberal democratic states have involved the use of private companies for purposes of detention and the debate is whether such involvement is only for immigration control…

Abstract

Purpose

Liberal democratic states have involved the use of private companies for purposes of detention and the debate is whether such involvement is only for immigration control or whether they are primarily for macro-economic benefits. This paper aims to present the argument that a State wishing to detain migrants must do so within the purview of immigration control and in conformity to international human rights standards rather than other latent reasons such as macro-economic benefits. The exponential growths of immigration detention over the years, this paper argues, smack of latent reasons with unarguably macro-economic benefits accruing to these States.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology is doctrinal research focusing on immigration detention and privatization. Doctrinal research is library-based and reliance will be placed on primary and secondary materials such as legislations, case laws, soft laws on the one hand and textbooks, journals, articles, legal encyclopedia, databases and many valuable websites on the other hand.

Findings

Findings have been made of similarities in State practice between the UK, the USA and Australia and conclude that the trend is worrying given that privatization of the detention estate lends credence to the fact that growing international prison industry influences prison and detention policies.

Research limitations/implications

These have portent implications for the violations of the rights of detainees and weaken the protection of rights under international human rights law.

Originality/value

The originality of this paper lies in its ability to unravel the legitimacy of immigration detention in the face of privatization and macro-economic benefits accruing to States, thereby querying the availability of the rights of migrants within the remit of State practice.

Details

International Journal of Law and Management, vol. 60 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-243X

Keywords

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Abstract

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

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