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Book part
Publication date: 18 November 2019

Jack Donnelly

Abstract

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Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Human Dignity and Human Rights
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-821-6

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Book part
Publication date: 26 February 2016

Ursula Gorham, Natalie Greene Taylor and Paul T. Jaeger

This chapter summarizes the core human rights and social justice functions of libraries.

Abstract

Purpose

This chapter summarizes the core human rights and social justice functions of libraries.

Methodology/approach

After reviewing how each chapter of this edited volume offers evidence of libraries’ clear contributions in the area of human rights and social justice, this chapter explores in greater detail how the current environment in which libraries operate impacts their ability to promote human rights and social justice.

Findings

In many communities, libraries are the only institution capable of fulfilling a wide array of social justice and human rights roles. As they seek to fulfill these roles, however, libraries face significant challenges related to the lack of emphasis on considerations of human rights and social justice within the pedagogy, research, and practice of our field.

Originality/value

This chapter serves as a call to action for library practitioners, educators, and researchers to better articulate the social justice and human rights roles of libraries to policy-makers, funders, politicians, and community members.

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Perspectives on Libraries as Institutions of Human Rights and Social Justice
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-057-2

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Article
Publication date: 18 August 2021

Sheshadri Chatterjee, Sreenivasulu N.S. and Zahid Hussain

The applications of artificial intelligence (AI) in different sectors have become agendas for discussions in the highest circle of experts. The applications of AI can help…

Abstract

Purpose

The applications of artificial intelligence (AI) in different sectors have become agendas for discussions in the highest circle of experts. The applications of AI can help society and can harm society even by jeopardizing human rights. The purpose of this study is to examine the evolution of AI and its impacts on human rights from social and legal perspectives.

Design/methodology/approach

With the help of studies of literature and different other AI and human rights-related reports, this study has taken an attempt to provide a comprehensive and executable framework to address these challenges contemplated to occur due to the increase in usage of different AI applications in the context of human rights.

Findings

This study finds out how different AI applications could help society and harm society. It also highlighted different legal issues and associated complexity arising due to the advancement of AI technology. Finally, the study also provided few recommendations to the governments, private enterprises and non-governmental organizations on the usage of different AI applications in their organizations.

Research limitations/implications

This study mostly deals with the legal, social and business-related issues arising due to the advancement of AI technology. The study does not penetrate the technological aspects and algorithms used in AI applications. Policymakers, government agencies and private entities, as well as practitioners could take the help of the recommendations provided in this study to formulate appropriate regulations to control the usage of AI technology and its applications.

Originality/value

This study provides a comprehensive view of the emergence of AI technology and its implication on human rights. There are only a few studies that examine AI and related human rights issues from social, legal and business perspectives. Thus, this study is claimed to be a unique study. Also, this study provides valuable inputs to the government agencies, policymakers and practitioners about the need to formulate a comprehensive regulation to control the usage of AI technology which is also another unique contribution of this study.

Details

International Journal of Law and Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-243X

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Article
Publication date: 27 August 2021

Varsha Agarwal, Avnish Sharma, Aneesya Panicker, Syeda Shifa and Rohit Rammurthy

This research aims to discuss the key civil rights problems in mental well-being and the solutions to those challenges in standard-setting and institutional practice, as…

Abstract

Purpose

This research aims to discuss the key civil rights problems in mental well-being and the solutions to those challenges in standard-setting and institutional practice, as well as proposes an integrated approach to adapting the emerging principles of practice to divisive mental health concerns.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is based on review of literature focused on mental health and human rights with special reference to international standards and clinical practices. Recent articles related to mental health and human rights and mechanisms suggested by United nations were included to draw conclusion.

Findings

Review of literature suggested to switch from reactive to a constructive and pragmatic approach, which is community-based, emphasizing alliance, rather than action, when the client is still too damaged to agree. Treatment should go hand in hand with mental health and civil rights education in the neighbourhood, as well as opportunities for engagement in shared interests in the group and interaction of other individuals with living experience.

Originality/value

While consent to care is a vital issue for human rights, the view of individuals with psychiatric illnesses as dangerous and “out of reach” is perpetuated by a disproportionate emphasis on it. Treatment should go hand in hand with mental health and civil rights education in the neighbourhood, as well as opportunities for engagement in shared interests in the group and interaction of other individuals with living experience.

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International Journal of Human Rights in Healthcare, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4902

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Article
Publication date: 26 July 2021

Peace Njideka Iheanacho, Chisom Joy Mbadugha, Chinenye Juliet Anetekhai, Chinenye Ifeoma Ubah, Adaobi Lilian Obiekwu and Nonye Anne Chukwujama

Human right is a phenomenon universal to all but greatly significant for disadvantaged groups like people with mental illness who due to the limitations of their illness…

Abstract

Purpose

Human right is a phenomenon universal to all but greatly significant for disadvantaged groups like people with mental illness who due to the limitations of their illness cannot assert their rights. This study aims to assess the knowledge and attitude of nursing students regarding the human rights of people with mental illness.

Design/methodology/approach

A descriptive study was conducted among 72 nursing students purposively selected from two nursing schools in Enugu, Nigeria. Data were collected using a 38 item literature-based questionnaire developed by the researchers. The reliability of the instrument was established using Cronbach’s alpha model with 0.812 coefficients.

Findings

Participants 32 (44.4%) demonstrated moderate knowledge regarding the human rights of people with mental illness. The attitude of nursing students towards the right of people with mental illness was positive (2.81). There is no significant difference in knowledge between students of the two schools, p = 0.199 (>0.05). However, the study showed that students from basic nursing school had a more favourable attitude towards the rights of people with mental illness compared to the post-basic nursing students, p = 0.050 (<0.05).

Originality/value

The rising incidence of human right violation in mental health practice indicates the need to assess the knowledge and attitude of the future workforce who play a critical role in the care and management of people with mental illness. The nursing curriculum should provide nursing students in their various institutions of training, sufficient information on the human rights of people with mental illness. Also, a legal structure in Nigeria for people with mental illness is imperative to protect them from gross human rights violations.

Details

International Journal of Human Rights in Healthcare, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4902

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Book part
Publication date: 14 December 2015

Muhammad Azizul Islam, Annette Quayle and Shamima Haque

This chapter focuses on the development of corporate human rights standards since the United Nations Conference on Environment and Development, better known as the Earth…

Abstract

This chapter focuses on the development of corporate human rights standards since the United Nations Conference on Environment and Development, better known as the Earth Summit was held in Rio de Janeiro in 1992. One of the important agendas for this Summit was human rights (apart from the climate change issue). This chapter provides a critical evaluation of institutional change in human rights guidelines and associated corporate (non) accountability in relation to human rights in line with the RIO summit. Based on a review of the media reports, archival documents and a case study, we argue that while there are a number of international organisations working towards the creation of corporate accountability in relation to human rights, there is limited real change in corporate action when faced with no government regulation. A radical (reform-based) approach, such as mandatory monitoring (compliance audit) and disclosure requirements is necessary to ensure corporate accountability in relation to human rights.

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Sustainability After Rio
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-444-7

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Book part
Publication date: 16 May 2017

Hugh Breakey

What is the relationship between human rights and corruption? This question can take different forms, including moral, legal, socio-political and economic variants. This…

Abstract

What is the relationship between human rights and corruption? This question can take different forms, including moral, legal, socio-political and economic variants. This paper focuses on two key moral questions, asking whether corruption can violate or impact on people’s natural rights (on the one hand) or human rights (on the other). In answer, I aim to establish a strong conceptual link between (a) corruption’s ‘abuse of entrusted power’; (b) the ‘arbitrary power’ targeted by natural rights theorists like John Locke and the broader republican tradition and (c) the ‘arbitrary interference’ with protected freedoms prohibited by the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. I argue that the deep thematic links between systemic corruption and violations of human rights are stronger than have hitherto been recognized. In the twenty-first century, corruption should be recognized as a ‘standard threat’ (in Shue’s sense) to human flourishing and protected freedoms, vindicating the human right to freedom from systemic corruption.

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Responsible Leadership and Ethical Decision-Making
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-416-3

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Book part
Publication date: 14 October 2011

Mahin Gosine

A sociology of human rights is a modern challenge, and this study draws on the universalizing codification in the history of human rights documents from ancient societies…

Abstract

A sociology of human rights is a modern challenge, and this study draws on the universalizing codification in the history of human rights documents from ancient societies to the present challenges of modern society. Power contradictions and conflicts are analyzed in the case study of historic inequalities and the modern deprivation of human rights of the People of Indian Origin in their diaspora in the modern world. Insider perspectives are posed to increase awareness and knowledge to the forming of community identity and to challenge others to study these complex social conditions. A public sociology is assumed in this chapter, derived from the author's public speech to further the development of a sociology of human rights, one that will reflect the complexity, universality, and inclusiveness protected by the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Established methods and theories may be augmented by challenging their bases and working collaboratively to research contemporary human rights.

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Human Rights and Media
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76230-052-5

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Book part
Publication date: 3 August 2011

Leila Kawar

This chapter examines how international human rights law is shaping the politics of immigration. It argues that migrant human rights are neither conceptually nor…

Abstract

This chapter examines how international human rights law is shaping the politics of immigration. It argues that migrant human rights are neither conceptually nor practically incompatible with an international order premised upon state territorial sovereignty, and that the specific aesthetics of the contemporary international human rights system, namely its formalistic and legalistic tendencies, has facilitated its integration with a realm of policymaking traditionally reserved to state discretion. An exploration of two areas in the emerging field of migrant human rights traces the multi-scalar transnational legal processes through which these norms are formulated and internalized.

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Special Issue Human Rights: New Possibilities/New Problems
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-252-4

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Book part
Publication date: 9 April 2021

Irene Antonopoulos and Omar Madhloom

The global Clinical Legal Education (CLE) movement transcends borders as law teachers worldwide try to inculcate law students and future legal practitioners with social…

Abstract

The global Clinical Legal Education (CLE) movement transcends borders as law teachers worldwide try to inculcate law students and future legal practitioners with social justice values. One method of achieving this is through developing reflective practitioners. Kolb, finding common ground in the work of Lewin, Dewey, and Piaget, formulated the four stages in the experiential development of concrete experience, reflective observation, abstract conceptualization, and active experiment. Although Kolb’s model is used in legal education literature, students may not be provided with the relevant conceptual tools required to engage in reflective practice. This often results in students providing subjective analysis of their work, which fails to fully contribute to their educational experience. One of the reasons for omitting analytical tools is that reflective practice suffers from a lack of conceptual clarity. According to Kinsella, the “concept remains elusive, is open to multiple interpretations, and is applied in a myriad of ways in educational and practice environments”. A further issue hindering reflective practice relates to Donald Schön’s critique of the positivist approach adopted by law schools.

This chapter will apply a human rights framework to CLE to develop reflective practitioners. The two main reasons for this are, first, human rights as formulated by the Universal Declaration on Human Rights are universal, interrelated, and indivisible and, second, reflection based on these universal human rights values will benefit cross-jurisdictional societies in assisting vulnerable clients affected by emerging implied and direct human rights challenges.

Details

International Perspectives in Social Justice Programs at the Institutional and Community Levels
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-489-9

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