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Article
Publication date: 13 August 2021

Mohammad Alshuniaber, Omar Alhaj, Qasem Abdallah and Haitham Jahrami

This study aims to investigate the antihypertensive effect of camel milk hydrolysate in rats with fructose-induced hypertension.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the antihypertensive effect of camel milk hydrolysate in rats with fructose-induced hypertension.

Design/methodology/approach

The antihypertensive effect of fermented camel milk was determined using 6 groups comprising 36 Wistar male rats. Blood pressure of rats was altered via exposure to a 10% fructose (w/v) diet in drinking water for 3 weeks before conducting 21 days of treatment. The authors conducted the experiment for short and long term using different doses of 800 and 1,200 mg/kg body weight. Serum was used to assay total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride (TG), glucose and insulin levels using standard biochemical kits.

Findings

The group that received 1,200 mg hydrolysate camel milk (HM) has significantly (p = 0.003) reduced systolic and diastolic blood pressure after a short exposure time (4–8 h). These effects were significantly (p = 0.005) comparable to the nifedipine (NIF) drug group. Similar long-term (21 days) effects on blood pressure were observed in 1,200 mg HM and NIF groups. Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) activity and levels were also reduced in a correlation with blood pressure reduction only in HM1200 and HM800 treated groups. The authors observed no significant effect on blood pressure in groups receiving the 800 mg HM or 1,200 mg unhydrolyzed camel milk (UM). Rats receiving the 10% fructose diet showed significant differences from control rats regarding their blood biochemistry, including TG, TC, blood glucose and insulin levels. Rats in groups NIF, HM1200 and HM800 showed a significant (p < 0.05) reduction in serum glucose, insulin, TG and TC levels toward the baseline level.

Research limitations/implications

Further mechanistic investigation on the HM antihypertensive activity is highly recommended before suggesting HM as a product to reduce blood pressure. While drug–food interaction between HM and antihypertensive drugs, especially ACE inhibitors, is probable, UM seems not to affect blood pressure or ACE activity and therefore is expected to have no or minimal effects on the activity of other antihypertensive drugs. Investigation of ACE expression from various organs including lungs and leukocytes is highly recommended in future works using sodium dodecyl-sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and western blot analysis or reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction.

Originality/value

No previous studies have measured the antihypertensive activity of milk hydrolysate mediated by the reduction of ACE activity and levels in plasma. Mechanisms involved in attenuating the levels of ACE warrant further investigation.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science , vol. 52 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 July 2021

Ahmad F. Alenezi, Ahmed Aljowder, Mohamed J. Almarzooqi, Marya Alsayed, Rashed Aldoseri, Omar Alhaj, Sally Souraya, Graham Thornicroft and Haitham Jahrami

This paper aims to translate and validate an Arabic version of the Barriers to Access to Care Evaluation (BACE) BACE scale to make it appropriate for the targeted socio-cultural…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to translate and validate an Arabic version of the Barriers to Access to Care Evaluation (BACE) BACE scale to make it appropriate for the targeted socio-cultural and linguistic context.

Design/methodology/approach

This psychometric study has two main compounds: translating the BACE into Arabic and validating it. Using the back-translation method, the authors involved seven professional individuals to maximize the efficacy of the translated version. The authors began with the process of translating the scale from English into Arabic and vice versa followed by evaluation, compression and matching. Later, a pilot study with a sample size of 35 participants was conducted to receive feedback on the Arabic version of the scale. Finally, an online survey was generated and distributed among Arabic-speaking countries; a total of 630 participants were voluntarily involved in this study.

Findings

A total of 630 participants completed the survey with a mean age of 31.4 ± 12.9, and 402 (63.8%) were females. Cronbach’s alpha coefficient and McDonald's Omega coefficient were both greater than 0.9. The confirmatory factor analysis was found to fit highly satisfactory with the stigma-related barriers.

Research limitations/implications

The BACE was validated in Arabic and its psychometric properties were examined in-depth and found to be strong.

Originality/value

This paper fulfils an identified need to translate tools to make mental health more accessible to patients in need.

Details

Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 4 April 2023

Areej Alsaad, Kawthar Aleid, Layla Almadani, Omar Alhaj, Haitham Jahrami and Abdulrahman Janahi

This study aimed to assess the influence of the community-based campaign on weight loss and healthy lifestyle adoption among Bahrain's adult population.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aimed to assess the influence of the community-based campaign on weight loss and healthy lifestyle adoption among Bahrain's adult population.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross -sectional self-reported online questionnaire completed in February 2021. The survey evaluated the impact of the community-based campaign health program which includes (exercise, diet plan and psychological eating behavior) weight reduction using social media platforms. The authors employed data from young and middle-aged healthy adults (n = 842) between the ages of 18-55 years, of both sexes. The intervention group (n = 842) was made up of the supporters of the voluntary community initiative called Obesity does not Suit Me (n = 194), and the control group (n = 648) was made up of non-followers of the campaign.

Findings

The study showed a statistically significant difference among the followers of the community-based campaign health program in the following parameters: 3.90-4.23 kg less, 1.46-1.59 difference in BMI and 0.05-0.06 WHR. All changes were of low effect size.

Originality/value

Diet and exercise had significant impact on weight, BMI and WHR among the followers of the community campaign. However, more research is required for sponsorship to increase the motivation and rewards for the community campaign.

Details

Arab Gulf Journal of Scientific Research, vol. 42 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1985-9899

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 June 2021

Abdulrahman Ismaeel Janahi, Iman Fahmi Mahmoud, Ibrahim Mohammed Al Alhareth, Alaa Yousef Alnakhli, Sara Nasser Almisrea, Hadel Mohammed Aljohani, Omar A. Alhaj, Adla Bakri Hassan and Haitham Jahrami

The complex interaction between the gut flora and central nervous systems made probiotics one promising natural candidate for the management and treatment of depression. Hence…

Abstract

Purpose

The complex interaction between the gut flora and central nervous systems made probiotics one promising natural candidate for the management and treatment of depression. Hence, the purpose of this paper was to assess the knowledge, patterns of consumption and attitudes of patients with depression toward probiotics.

Design/methodology/approach

In this cross-sectional study, and through simple random sampling, 200 adults who were diagnosed with various depressive symptoms were selected. A link to a self-reported survey was sent to them with the aim of collecting sociodemographic data, assessing participants’ attitudes and knowledge toward probiotic consumption, and measuring their depression status via the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9).

Findings

A total of 164 participants (82%) provided usable responses. Approximately 55% of participants had moderate depression (PHQ-9). Participants (22.6%) tend to comply with their psychiatrists’ advice regarding probiotics more than other health specialists’ advice (p = 0.04). Only 59 (36%) had knowledge about probiotics and believed that probiotics should be consumed regularly and not only after an antibiotic course. However, many tended to follow marketing tricks and were willing to buy the most expensive and advertised probiotic products. Participants showed some differences in their attitude and knowledge toward probiotics according to symptoms severity; however, the differences were insignificant (p = 0.88).

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this study is believed to be the first investigation assessing the probiotics’ knowledge, patterns of consumption and attitude of patients with various depression symptoms in Bahrain. The findings of this study may help improve the well-being of depressive patients by addressing the probiotic knowledge gap among them, expand the market of probiotics and enrich nutritional psychiatry literature.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science , vol. 51 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 November 2018

Tom Parkinson, Tarek Zoubir, Shaher Abdullateef, Musallam Abedtalas, Ghana Alyamani, Ziad Al Ibrahim, Majdi Al Husni, Fuad Alhaj Omar, Hamoud Hajhamoud, Fadi Iboor, Husam Allito, Michael Jenkins, Abdulkader Rashwani, Adnan Sennou and Fateh Shaban

The purpose of this paper is twofold: first, to generate insight into the experiences of Syrian academics in exile in Turkey; and second, to explore approaches to collaboration…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is twofold: first, to generate insight into the experiences of Syrian academics in exile in Turkey; and second, to explore approaches to collaboration and community building among academics in exile and with counterparts in the international academic community.

Design/methodology/approach

The study employs a hybrid visual-autobiographical narrative methodology, embedded within a large group process (LGP) design.

Findings

Findings are presented in two phases: the first phase presents a thematic analysis of narrative data, revealing the common and divergent experiences of 12 exiled academics. The second phase presents a reflective evaluation of undertaking the LGP and its implications for community building and sustaining Syrian academia in exile.

Research limitations/implications

While this is a qualitative study with a small participant group, and therefore does not provide a basis for statistical generalisation, it offers rich insight into Syrian academics’ lived experiences of exile, and into strategies implemented to support the Syrian academic community in exile.

Practical implications

The study has practical implications for academic development in the contexts of conflict and exile; community building among dispersed academic communities; educational interventions by international NGOs and the international academic community; and group process design.

Originality/value

The study makes an original contribution to the limited literature on post-2011 Syrian higher education by giving voice to a community of exiled academics, and by critically evaluating a strategic initiative for supporting and sustaining Syrian academia. This represents significant, transferable insight for comparable contexts.

Details

International Journal of Comparative Education and Development, vol. 20 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2396-7404

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 June 2007

Omar A. Alhaj, Ara D. Kanekanian and Adrian C. Peters

The main aim of this study is to investigate the whey protein profiles of different commercially available fermented milk drinks that might have been influenced by the growth of…

1589

Abstract

Purpose

The main aim of this study is to investigate the whey protein profiles of different commercially available fermented milk drinks that might have been influenced by the growth of probiotics bacteria that have been added according to the claims made by the manufacturer.

Design/methodology/approach

The growth and the subsequent effect of probiotics on whey proteins were investigated through the peptide profiles of the hydrolysed whey protein. The profiles of whey proteins in skimmed milk and the four other probiotic fermented milk drinks were obtained by using the FPLC technique. Changes in whey proteins profiles in fermented milks were evaluated by comparing them with those of unfermented skimmed milk (control). The four samples were those of Yakult, Actimel, Muller and Tesco probiotic cranberry drinks.

Findings

This work has shown that all samples demonstrated a degree of protein hydrolysis. The high level of hydrolysis in “Yakult” and “Actimel” drink samples might have been due to the nature of the process, the length of time of fermentation or the high level of proteolytic activities of the micro‐organisms used. When compared with casein, it seems that whey proteins are more resistant to hydrolysis. The results also indicated that only traces of α‐lactalbumin were left in the whey sample from “Yakult” drink. There were noticeable reductions in the other three samples. Orotic acid, on the other hand, showed a decrease in their concentration in all whey protein samples when compared with the skimmed milk sample, except for the “Actimel” sample, which showed a noticeable increase.

Originality/value

This work has shown that there were distinct differences between the control sample (skimmed milk) and the four commercially available probiotic milk‐based fermented health drinks when a direct comparison was carried out between these samples.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 109 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 June 2023

Yen Vy Bao Nguyen and An Hoang Kim Vo

The priority of this study is to contribute to the literature by examining herding behavior at different periods of the COVID-19 pandemic. Furthermore, this study aims to…

Abstract

Purpose

The priority of this study is to contribute to the literature by examining herding behavior at different periods of the COVID-19 pandemic. Furthermore, this study aims to investigate the herding behavior conditioned on market liquidity and information demand.

Design/methodology/approach

This study investigates herding behavior in Vietnam's stock exchanges (Ha Noi Stock Exchange and Ho Chi Minh Stock Exchange) on a sample of daily stock closing prices of 425 firms from 2018 to the first half of 2022.

Findings

The research confirms the existence of herding behavior not only for the whole but also during and post-COVID periods. These results are robust in both bull and bear markets, further confirming the influence of COVID-19 on herding in Vietnamese background. Moreover, when the authors condition exogenous factors for each period, the herding tendency is more evident at the medium market liquidity level than at high and low levels. Besides, the pandemic causes herding behavior of investors with low and medium information demand.

Research limitations/implications

These findings imply some recommendations that facilitate investors, policymakers and researchers in the context of the COVID-19 crisis.

Originality/value

The study contributes to the herding literature by examining herd behavior during the post-COVID period, suggesting the long-term impact of the health crisis. Furthermore, the research provides new evidence of herding behavior conditioned on market liquidity and information demand during different COVID sub-periods.

Details

Journal of Economic Studies, vol. 51 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3585

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 June 2020

Muhammad Ilyas Nadeem, Yasrul Izad Abu Bakar, Sana Akram and Atif Amin Baig

This study aims to determine the correlation of anthropometric measurements with serum lipid profile among Malay subjects in Kuala Terengganu, Malaysia.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to determine the correlation of anthropometric measurements with serum lipid profile among Malay subjects in Kuala Terengganu, Malaysia.

Design/methodology/approach

This cross-sectional study was conducted in Kuala Terengganu on a total of 193 individuals aged 18-60 years. Subjects were recruited via direct interview as per inclusion criteria and anthropometric measurements, i.e. body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), hip circumference (HC), waist-to-hip ratio (WHR), waist-to-height ratio, abdominal volume index and conicity index, were taken using International Standards for Anthropometric Assessment Guidelines. Fasting blood samples were collected for serum lipid profile analysis that measures triglyceride (TG), total cholesterol (TC), high-density lipoproteins (HDL), low-density lipoproteins (LDL), TG/HDL, TC/HDL and LDL/HDL. Besides socio-demographic characteristics, means and association of anthropometric parameters with lipid profiles were performed using simple linear regression and multivariate-adjusted regression analysis.

Findings

The mean age of obese (male [39.2 ± 8.7] and female [41.1 ± 1.0]) and non-obese (male [29.8 ± 1.3] and female [33.3 ± 1.3]) respondents was compared. Means of anthropometric indices and lipid profile were significantly (p < 0.001) higher in obese than in non-obese group. Multivariate-adjusted regression showed that weight and BMI increased risks for prevalent high TC, TG, LDL, TC/HDL, TG/HDL, LDL/HDL, hypercholesterolemia, hypertriglyceridemia and dyslipidemia. Regardless of sex, age and prevalent obese status, WHR increased risks for high prevalence of TC, TG, LDL, TC/HDL and LDL/HDL, and presents an independent risk factor for hypercholesterolemia and dyslipidemia. WC was highly associated with TG, while HC was associated with atherogenic lipid profile ratios: TC/HDL, TG/HDL and LDL/HDL.

Originality/value

In conclusion, the lipid profile (TC, TG and TG/HDL) of triglyceridemia and hypercholesteremia is highly correlated with anthropometric measurements (BMI, WC and WHR) of central obesity that predict obesity-associated cardiac risks.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science , vol. 51 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 13 February 2024

Tarig Zeinelabdeen Yousif Ahmed, Mawahib Eltayeb Ahmed, Quosay A. Ahmed and Asia Adlan Mohamed

The Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) of countries has some of the highest electricity consumptions and carbon dioxide emissions per capita in the world. This poses a direct…

Abstract

Purpose

The Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) of countries has some of the highest electricity consumptions and carbon dioxide emissions per capita in the world. This poses a direct challenge to the GCC government’s ability to meet their CO2 reduction targets. In this review paper the current household electricity consumption situation in the GCC is reviewed.

Design/methodology/approach

Three scenarios for reducing energy consumption and CO2 emissions are proposed and evaluated using strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats (SWOT) as well as the political, economic, social, technical, legal and environmental (PESTLE) frameworks.

Findings

The first scenario found that using solar Photovoltaic (PV) or hybrid solar PV and wind system to power household lighting could save significant amounts of energy, based on lighting making up between 8% to 30% of electricity consumption in GCC households. The second scenario considers replacement of conventional appliances with energy-efficient ones that use around 20% less energy. The third scenario looks at influencing consumer behavior towards sustainable energy consumption.

Practical implications

Pilot trials of these scenarios are recommended for a number of households. Then the results and feedback could be used to launch the schemes GCC-wide.

Social implications

The proposed scenarios are designed to encourage responsible electricity consumption and production within households (SDG12).

Originality/value

All three proposals are found viable for policymakers to implement. However, to ensure successful implementation GCC Governments are recommended to review all the opportunities and challenges associated with these schemes as laid out in this paper.

Details

Arab Gulf Journal of Scientific Research, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1985-9899

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 December 2022

Shallu Batra, Mohit Saini, Mahender Yadav and Vaibhav Aggarwal

This study aims to conduct a comprehensive bibliometric analysis to determine the intellectual structure of cross-listing studies and suggests a road map for future research in…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to conduct a comprehensive bibliometric analysis to determine the intellectual structure of cross-listing studies and suggests a road map for future research in this field.

Design/methodology/approach

A step-by-step procedure was carried out. With the help of a defined search string, 580 articles from reputed journals have been retrieved from the Scopus database. Bibliographic coupling and keyword analysis were executed to understand the current research scenario and future research directions in this research field. In addition, R Studio combined with VOSviewer was employed to analyse and visualise the data.

Findings

The results provide a deeper insight into publication trends, most prolific countries, institutions and journals in the area of cross-listing. The highest collaboration was observed between the authors in the USA and Canada. Moreover, the results contradict Bradford's and Lotka's laws. A thorough review of the literature identifies five clusters in this domain. Finally, keyword analysis offers a future road map in cross-listing research.

Originality/value

Researchers have shown greater interest in cross-listing topics over the past decades. Even though the research volume on this subject is increasing, the current retrospective is still insufficient. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this study is the first to provide valuable insights to practitioners, academicians, and prospective researchers about the intellectual structure of cross-listing and also offers future avenues in this research field through bibliometric analysis.

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