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Article
Publication date: 12 June 2020

Heini Taiminen, Kimmo Taiminen and Juha Munnukka

This study aims to understand how online weight loss services could help customers achieve a durable change. The particular focus is on exploring the roles of value…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to understand how online weight loss services could help customers achieve a durable change. The particular focus is on exploring the roles of value co-creation and well-being outcomes in reinforcing the transformative value potential, which is argued to be realized as customers’ intentions to continue a healthier lifestyle after the service period has ended.

Design/methodology/approach

Data was collected from the participants of an online weight loss service (n =498), and a conceptual research model was tested using structural equation modelling.

Findings

The results imply that compliance with the guidelines and social support are two value co-creation activities that can influence the well-being outcomes of transformative services (i.e. perceived behavioral control and satisfaction with one’s achievements). These well-being outcomes help attain the transformative value potential of online weight loss services. However, the actual weight loss affected the transformative value potential only through customers’ satisfaction with their achievements as a subjective well-being outcome.

Originality/value

This study provides insight into the transformative value potential of services in the weight loss context. This study contributes to the transformative service research by focusing on the role of online services in reinforcing a durable change through the co-creation of value and improvements in customers’ well-being.

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Article
Publication date: 8 February 2013

Julie A. Pirsch, Stacy Landreth Grau and Michael Jay Polonsky

The aim of this paper is to outline key social marketing issues apparent in deceptive weightloss advertising, from the perspective of government policy‐makers…

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1241

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to outline key social marketing issues apparent in deceptive weightloss advertising, from the perspective of government policy‐makers, manufacturers, the media, and consumers. The purpose is to examine the complexity of one aspect of the obesity battle and provide a framework for coordinated and integrated social marketing initiatives from a multiple stakeholder perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

The results of deceptive weightloss advertising are framed using the harm chain model, and the paper offers recommended solutions based on a framework of marketing, education and policy changes across the network of stakeholders.

Findings

This paper concludes that a resolution to the harm created by deceptive weightloss advertising can be achieved by the creation of a more holistic, system‐wide solution to this important health and policy issue. This networked approach must involve all aspects of harm in a multi‐stakeholder solution, including both upstream and downstream integration. Specific recommendations are made for policy‐makers, manufacturers, the media, and consumers to achieve this goal.

Social implications

From a marketing perspective, analyzing the issue of deceptive weightloss advertising using the harm chain allows for the creation of a more holistic, system‐wide solution involving stakeholders in all aspects of harm for this important health and policy issue.

Originality/value

This research examines the problem of obesity and weightloss advertising from the unique perspective of the harm chain framework. The authors make unified recommendations for various stakeholders including industry, media, government and consumers, in order to direct integrated social marketing and consumer‐oriented strategies within this industry.

Details

Journal of Social Marketing, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-6763

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Article
Publication date: 30 July 2020

Madeleine Besson, Patricia Gurviez and Julia Carins

When fighting the burden of overweight and obesity, diet remains a powerful preventive factor. The purpose of this paper is to stimulate more efficient interventions on…

Abstract

Purpose

When fighting the burden of overweight and obesity, diet remains a powerful preventive factor. The purpose of this paper is to stimulate more efficient interventions on diet change by synthesising knowledge of previous weight loss programmes based on the use of digital devices.

Design/methodology/approach

Following the preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses approach, a systematic literature review through five databases was undertaken focussed on the assessment of studies oriented towards diet change that incorporated digital devices including computers, tablets, mobile phones, portable and non-portable tracking devices. In total, 15 empirical studies (2004–2018) were identified and examined for efficacy and presence of theory and behaviour change techniques.

Findings

Digital devices supporting weight loss programmes have evolved rapidly over the past 15 years, from reminders using the short message system to self-quantification through mobile applications. Nine studies show a significant difference between conditions, in favour or one (or more) intervention arm. The remaining studies failed to find significance between conditions but were using a comparison with an active intervention, potentially indicating equivalent efficacy. A low level of theory use and use of behavioural techniques was evident.

Research limitations/implications

The literature review is limited to studies that have scientifically evaluated the (potential) weight loss associated with the weight loss intervention. This review could be put into perspective with other complementary research, in particular, qualitative research aimed at exploring participants’ motivations to use (or not) digital devices to lose weight.

Social implications

Given their low cost and the size of the overweight population, it appears that public health policies could integrate digital devices more strongly in their efforts to combat obesity. Social marketing can add its expertise to medical-based programmes which in return bring their need for more quantitative evaluation of the efficacy of the interventions.

Originality/value

Few previous reviews have examined the extent of the efficiency in digital diet change programmes. The review shows that, in general, digital interventions can support weight loss for adults; however, more studies are required to provide a strong evidence base for efficacy. Given their low cost and the size of the overweight population, public health policies could integrate these devices more strongly in their efforts to combat obesity. A theory-driven social marketing perspective could enhance development ensuring interventions are effective and valued by users.

Details

Journal of Social Marketing, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-6763

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2005

C.H.S. Ruxton, F. Hinton and C.E.L. Evans

Aims to carry out a consumer intervention study to evaluate the impact of an over‐the‐counter herbal weight management product (Zotrim®) on weight and waist circumference.

Abstract

Purpose

Aims to carry out a consumer intervention study to evaluate the impact of an over‐the‐counter herbal weight management product (Zotrim®) on weight and waist circumference.

Design/methodology/approach

Overweight women were recruited using local media and 61 passed initial screening to begin a four‐week intervention using a free sample of Zotrim at a dosage corresponding to manufacturers’ recommendations. A total of 56 subjects completed the study, but data on all 61 were included in the “intention to treat” analysis.

Findings

There was a self‐reported mean weight loss of 1.79kg (0.45kg per week) at week 4. Data on perceived hunger and fullness from three sets of questionnaires suggested that subjects felt less hungry between meals and fuller after meals at weeks 1 and 4 compared with base‐line. This is likely to have impacted on energy intake and may account for the weight loss. Average weight loss as a percentage of baseline was 2.3 per cent, but this masked a broad range, suggesting that some subjects benefited more than others. Taking into account adjusted guidelines for clinically significant weight loss, 23 per cent of subjects achieved this cut‐off, suggesting that their risk of chronic disease had reduced. Similarly, waist circumference (an independent measure of disease risk) decreased by an average of 4.3cm during the four‐week period. This reduced the number of subjects exceeding SIGN guidelines for central obesity from 93 per cent to 83 per cent.

Originality/value

Adds to the body of knowledge by proring that Zotrim can aid weight loss and help reduce waist circumference.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 35 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 29 November 2021

Yi-Fen Liu and I-Ling Ling

Weight loss services feature high consumer involvement that is sometimes marked by repetitive failures. These features can affect regret and its associated factors…

Abstract

Purpose

Weight loss services feature high consumer involvement that is sometimes marked by repetitive failures. These features can affect regret and its associated factors differently from the way that discrete failure can. The purpose of this study is to investigate consumer regret over repetitive failures in weight loss services as well as its antecedents (overeating and insufficient exercise), consequences (rumination and reflection) and moderators (failure experiences and required effort). This study also investigates how rumination and reflection affect persistence intention.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 318 samples were collected through three surveys, one of which contained a scenario, provided to consumers who experienced repetitive failures in weight loss. The proposed relationships were tested using structural equation modeling, dominance analysis and PROCESS modeling.

Findings

The results of this study reveal that overeating contributes to regret more saliently than does insufficient exercise. The effect of regret on rumination (thoughts about continuing to blame oneself and giving up the pursuit of goals) is stronger than on reflection (thoughts about learning from prior failures and willingness to try again), and greater reflection results in higher persistence intention. Moreover, the effect of insufficient exercise on regret and the effect of regret on rumination are augmented with cumulative failure experiences, whereas required effort enhances the impact of regret on reflection.

Originality/value

This study is the first to focus on regret over repetitive failures in weight loss. It advances the literature by clarifying the antecedents and consequences of regret, showing how failure experiences influence the relationships between regret and its associated factors as well as identifying interventions that benefit from regret.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Article
Publication date: 19 October 2021

So-young Kim and Meeyoung Kim

The study aimed to analyse the nutritional quality of self-proposed or prescribed weight-loss diets shared by female Korean adolescents through a social media platform and…

Abstract

Purpose

The study aimed to analyse the nutritional quality of self-proposed or prescribed weight-loss diets shared by female Korean adolescents through a social media platform and identified potential dietary problems.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 317 weight-loss diets, shared by 107 female adolescents between the ages of 12 and 18 in April 2019, were collected from three Kakao Open Chat rooms of which the main topic was “weight-loss diet”. The weight-loss diets were converted to daily energy and nutrient intake.

Findings

Approximately two-thirds of the subjects were normal or underweight, and more than half of them were limiting energy intake to less than half of the recommended daily amounts. The average daily intake of energy and most nutrients did not meet the standard intake levels. Approximately 20% of the subjects were breakfast skippers, while 8 and 5% were dinner and lunch skippers, respectively. Notably, meal skippers tended to fast longer and have an uneven distribution of daily energy intake per meal. The percentages of energy contribution from macronutrients, particularly carbohydrates, also deviated more from the acceptable range in the meal skippers. The weight-loss diets of the subjects with particularly low daily energy intake were categorised into simplified, unbalanced and nutrient-poor, energy-dense meals. Overall, the nutritional quality of the self-proposed or prescribed weight-loss diets was poor. More effective and proactive educational interventions in school environments should be developed to promote positive eating behaviours in adolescents and free them from their obsession with body image.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this study is the first attempt to analyse the nutritional quality of female adolescents' self-proposed or prescribed weight-loss diets.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 16 June 2021

Elif Didem Ors and Zeynep Goktas

Obesity is a chronic disease that is conjoined with increased mortality. Parallel to rising obesity rates, herbal dietary interventions to lose weight are also increasing…

Abstract

Purpose

Obesity is a chronic disease that is conjoined with increased mortality. Parallel to rising obesity rates, herbal dietary interventions to lose weight are also increasing. The purpose of this study is to assess and evaluate the use of herbal dietary interventions for weight loss among regularly exercising women.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 545 regularly exercising women (aged 19–64 years) were recruited from several local sports centers. A questionnaire form to evaluate demographic characteristics, nutritional habits and herbal dietary intervention habits was administered by a trained dietitian. Anthropometric measurements including weight, height, fat mass, total body water and fat free mass were measured using a bioelectrical impedance analysis device.

Findings

A total of 244 participants (44.8%) used herbal dietary interventions for weight loss within the last year. The most commonly used herbal dietary interventions were green tea (59.4%), lemon juice (27%), herbal tea mix (20.9%) and cinnamon powder (17.6%), respectively. Of the 244 women who used herbal dietary interventions for weight loss, 42.2% claimed that by using these products they experienced weight loss. Herbal dietary interventions were significantly higher among women with obesity (61.9%) than women with a healthy weight (37.5%). The use of herbal supplements increased among women who consider themselves as being overweight (p < 0.001). Furthermore, herbal dietary interventions decreased with more frequent attempts for a weight-loss diet (p < 0.001).

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this study represents a first attempt at assessing the use of herbal dietary supplements for weight loss among regularly exercising Turkish women. With the increase of body mass index and body perception being as overweight, herbal dietary interventions were also increased. In particular, women with obesity (61.9%) used more herbal dietary interventions than women with healthy weight (37.5%). Moreover, women with an overweight body perception used more herbal supplements than those who thought they had a healthy body weight.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science , vol. 51 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 14 June 2013

Stephanie Dellande and Prashanth Nyer

The purpose of this study is to shed greater light on the factors that influence consumer compliance behavior, e.g. SRF, in compliance dependent services (CDS). CDS, e.g…

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1066

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to shed greater light on the factors that influence consumer compliance behavior, e.g. SRF, in compliance dependent services (CDS). CDS, e.g. weight loss, retirement savings, education, credit repair, are long term in nature, often requiring lifestyle changes. In addition, and importantly, the customer's role in CDS extends beyond the face‐to‐face interaction and requires the consumer to comply with prescribed behaviors when away from the service provider.

Design/methodology/approach

The subjects were 243 female clients (aged 20 to 45) at a weight loss/fitness center located in south India. Subjects were selected from among the new clients who signed up for an eight‐week long weight loss and fitness program which seeks to help clients lose modest amounts of excess weight (averaging approximately ten pounds). On signing up, respondents completed a survey that included several scales of regulatory focus, and a question eliciting reasons for wanting to lose weight.

Findings

This study exams the role of self‐regulatory focus (SRF) in long‐term customer compliance behavior in weight loss. A specific measure of SRF led to better outcomes than the generalized measures of SRF.

Originality/value

Though this research project examines consumer behavior in the context of weight loss activities, it has far‐ranging implications for various services requiring consumers to engage in prescribed behaviors over the long run. For example, the success of debt counseling services and retirement savings programs require clients to engage in certain behaviors over the long run. Marketers of CDS programs will be able to use the findings of this research project to find new ways to increase long‐term customer compliance behavior.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. 36 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2005

C.H.S. Ruxton and E.J. Gardner

Over‐the‐counter (OTC) weight management products are popular with the public. Manufacturers frequently claim beneficial effects of these products, however current…

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1797

Abstract

Purpose

Over‐the‐counter (OTC) weight management products are popular with the public. Manufacturers frequently claim beneficial effects of these products, however current legislation does not compel them to support these claims with research. This paper identifies the key ingredients of OTC weight management products and evaluates evidence for their safety and efficacy.

Design/methodology/approach

Using Medline, published evidence on key ingredients and formulations was gathered. Contact was also made with manufacturers to ascertain whether unpublished data were available. All studies were assessed for quality. The efficacy and safety of the ingredients and formulations were then reviewed.

Findings

The results showed little evidence for most weight loss claims, with the exception of a formulation containing Yerba maté, Guarana and Damiana. In addition, studies on pyruvate, conjugated linoleic acid, and Citrus aurantium demonstrated positive effects on weight loss, suggesting that they may be useful in future formulations. Safety implications were noted for ephedrine.

Practical implications

Better labelling and supporting literature should be introduced by reputable manufacturers and retailers to help the public assess the efficacy of weight loss aids.

Research limitations/implications

Given the popularity of self‐treatment, there is a need for more manufacturers to submit their products to impartial clinical trials. OTC weight management products could be useful in addressing obesity, but most still need scientific evidence to demonstrate safety and effectiveness.

Originality/value

This review reviews the available evidence on ingredients of OTC weight management products, providing a unique guide to what works, and what doesn't.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 107 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 9 October 2012

Zoë Meleo-Erwin

Purpose – This chapter explores how discourses of obesity as addiction are taken up by weight loss surgery patients and medical and scientific professionals.…

Abstract

Purpose – This chapter explores how discourses of obesity as addiction are taken up by weight loss surgery patients and medical and scientific professionals.

Methodology/approach – Based on 14 semistructured interviews, I discuss the ways in which bariatric patients partially account for their presurgical bodies and contemporary struggles with weight loss and regain by referencing food addiction. This work is part of a larger project involving 35 interviews and participant-observation work and therefore these results should thus be considered preliminary.

Findings – I argue that bariatric patients and bariatric professionals portray weight loss surgery as an extraordinary tool that allows the “out of control” to become controllable. However, bariatric patients also emphasize the hard work that is entailed in both losing weight and maintaining a weight loss even after surgery.

Social implications – I suggest that this portrayal, in addition to being an accurate assessment of the potential for regain following weight loss surgery, is a technology of stigma management.

Originality/value – This work contributes to the sociology of the body and medical sociology literatures by illustrating that, within a neoliberal and anti-fat social context, highlighting the hard work involved in weight loss and weight maintenance allows bariatric patients to demonstrate proper subjectivity and thereby reclaim “proper selves” as they work toward a “proper bodies.”

Details

Critical Perspectives on Addiction
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-930-1

Keywords

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