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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2005

Wilco W. Chan

The over‐estimation of the energy requirements in new hotels would not only increase energy consumption but also result in other additional costs. To address this issue…

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Abstract

Purpose

The over‐estimation of the energy requirements in new hotels would not only increase energy consumption but also result in other additional costs. To address this issue, this study attempts to establish the benchmark of electricity consumption and models energy demand of hotels.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey of 17 hotels and two power suppliers was conducted. Two approaches, namely averaging and multiple regression, were used to analyze the data.

Findings

The former approach found that the average electricity usage was 313 kWh/m2/year for city hotels in subtropical areas. The multivariate analysis revealed two significant variables – cooling degree day and number of occupied rooms– which determine the level of electricity consumption. Based on these findings, projections on electricity consumption for hotels in the next few years were made.

Originality/value

This study provides a fine‐tuned norm of electricity consumption, confirms the best temperature of cooling degree days for modeling electricity demand and further highlights some practical measures on saving electricity.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Energy Economics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-780-1

Article
Publication date: 28 February 2022

Christophe Schinckus, Canh Phuc Nguyen and Felicia Hui Ling Chong

Given the growing importance of cryptocurrencies and the technique called “SegWit” that allows to compile more transactions in a mined block, the electricity consumed per…

Abstract

Purpose

Given the growing importance of cryptocurrencies and the technique called “SegWit” that allows to compile more transactions in a mined block, the electricity consumed per block might potentially decrease. The purpose of this study is to consider that the difficulty to mine a block might be a better indicator of the Bitcoin\Ether’s electricity consumption.

Design/methodology/approach

This study applies the vector error correction model to investigate data related to primary energy consumption and electricity production, supply and consumption for Bitcoin and Ether hashrates from 2016M1 to 2021M5.

Findings

The hashrate (difficulty of solving the cryptographic problem related to the validation of a transaction) is found to have a positive cointegration with energy and electricity consumption. Despite the launch of the Segregation Witness (SegWit) mechanism allowing blocks to handle a higher number of transactions per block, this Bitcoin and Ether growing need in electricity has significantly been increasing since October 2019.

Originality/value

The major contribution of this study is to investigate a more relevant indicator, namely, hashrate (computational difficulty to solve cryptographic enigma associated with cryptocurrencies-related transaction). The approach of this study can be justified by the fact that there exists a technical solution consisting in increasing the number of transactions per blocks so that less electricity might be required to validate a transaction.

Details

Studies in Economics and Finance, vol. 39 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1086-7376

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 July 2021

Amit Prakash Jha and Sanjay Kumar Singh

The Indian power sector is dominated by coal. Environmental awareness and advances in techno-economic front have led to a slow but steady shift towards greener…

Abstract

Purpose

The Indian power sector is dominated by coal. Environmental awareness and advances in techno-economic front have led to a slow but steady shift towards greener alternatives. The distributions of both fossil fuel resources and renewable energy potential are not uniform across the states. Paper attempts to answer how the states are performing in the sector and how the renewable energy and conventional resources are affecting the dynamics.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors employ a two-stage data envelopment analysis (DEA) to rank the performance of Indian states in the power sector. Multi-stage analysis opens up the DEA black-box through disaggregating power sector in two logical sub-sectors. The performance is evaluated from the point-of-view of policy formulating and implementing agencies. Further, an econometric analysis using seemingly unrelated regression equations (SURE) is conducted to estimate the determinants of total and industrial per-capita electricity consumption.

Findings

Efficiency scores obtained from the first phase of analysis happens to be a significant explanatory variable for power consumption. The growth in electricity consumption, which is necessary for economic wellbeing, is positively affected by both renewable and non-renewable sources; but conventional sources have a larger impact on per-capita consumption. Yet, the share of renewables in the energy mix has positive elasticity. Hence, the findings are encouraging, because development in storage technologies, falling costs and policy interventions are poised to give further impetus to renewable sources.

Originality/value

The study is one of the very few where entire spectrum of the Indian power sector is evaluated from efficiency perspective. Further, the second phase analysis gives additional relevant insights on the sector.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 29 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2021

Asia Kausar, Faiza Siddiqui, Abdul Khalique Gadhi, Saif Ullah and Omer Ali

This study aims to find out the dynamic and causal long-run and the short-run relationship between energy consumption (electricity usage) and energy production (electricity

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to find out the dynamic and causal long-run and the short-run relationship between energy consumption (electricity usage) and energy production (electricity creation) and also find out the relationship of these two variables based on past values for the SAARC nations (Pakistan, India, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka and Nepal).

Design/methodology/approach

Vector auto-regressive (VAR), auto-regressive distributive Lag (ARDL) and Granger causality test have been used in this study to estimate the dynamic and causal relationship between variables.

Findings

The unit-root tests were found insignificant at a magnitude but significant at the initial difference. VAR test results were found insignificant, which means co-integration among variables exists, which was tested by ARDL approach. Results suggested that energy consumption has a short-run relationship with energy production, but it was found insignificant in the other way round. The results of this study also suggest that both variables cause each other in the long run.

Research limitations/implications

This study was conducted in a limited environment as we do not have access to energy policies of SAARC countries, and also data access was limited; only five countries’ data was available. This study can help government bodies and policymakers to exchange the electricity across borders to diminish the electricity shortage in the SAARC region, as countries with abandoned resources can produce electricity at a little cost.

Originality/value

Penal data for this study was collected from World Development Indicators from the year 1971 to 2015.

Details

International Journal of Energy Sector Management, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6220

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 January 2018

Djula Borozan and Dubravka Pekanov Starcevic

The purpose of this paper is to explore the developments in final electricity consumption, estimate the portions of changes that can be attributed to national, sectoral or…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the developments in final electricity consumption, estimate the portions of changes that can be attributed to national, sectoral or regional factors, and to investigate determinants of the regional component (RC) in Croatia at the subnational level in the period 2001-2013.

Design/methodology/approach

In the first stage, the dynamic shift-share method is used to decompose final electricity consumption, and then, in the second stage, the panel population-averaged logit model is conducted to find the main determinants of the extracted RC.

Findings

The results show that both the sectoral factor and the regional factor are responsible for an increase in electricity consumption over the period considered, whereby the regional specificities had a larger impact in general. Thereby, the most developed regions, including the tourism-oriented ones, exhibited the largest average increase in electricity consumption mainly due to positive effects of the regional-specific factors, while the negative effects of these factors were mainly responsible for low average rates of changes in electricity consumption in less developed regions.

Practical implications

The results suggest that regional-specific energy conservation programs might be more effective in improving energy efficiency than the sector-oriented ones, as well as that socio-economic and contextual determinants matter when it comes to the probability of having a positive regional effect on the electricity consumption rate.

Originality/value

The paper investigated the determinants of the extracted RC which has not yet been addressed in the energy economics literature.

Details

International Journal of Energy Sector Management, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6220

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 May 2016

Markus Surmann, Wolfgang Andreas Brunauer and Sven Bienert

On the basis of corporate wholesale and hypermarket stores, this study aims to investigate the relationship between energy consumption, physical building characteristics…

Abstract

Purpose

On the basis of corporate wholesale and hypermarket stores, this study aims to investigate the relationship between energy consumption, physical building characteristics and operational sales performance and the impact of energy management on the corporate environmental performance.

Design/methodology/approach

A very unique dataset of METRO GROUP over 19 European countries is analyzed in a sophisticated econometric approach for the timeframe from January 2011 until December 2014. Multiple regression models are applied for the panel, to explain the electricity consumption of the corporate assets on a monthly basis and the total energy consumption on an annual basis. Using Generalized Additive Models, to model nonlinear covariate effects, the authors decompose the response variables into the implicit contribution of building characteristics, operational sales performance and energy management attributes, under control of the outdoor weather conditions and spatial–temporal effects.

Findings

METRO GROUP’s wholesale and hypermarket stores prove significant reductions in electricity and total energy consumption over the analyzed timeframe. Due to the implemented energy consumption and carbon emission reduction targets, the influence of the energy management measures, such as the identification of stores associated with the lowest energy performance, was found to contribute toward a more efficient corporate environmental performance.

Originality/value

In the context of corporate responsibility/sustainability of wholesale, hypermarket and retail corporations, the energy efficiency and reduction of carbon emissions from corporates’ real estate assets is of emerging interest. Besides the insights about the energy efficiency of corporate real estate assets, the role of the energy management, contributing to a more efficient corporate environmental performance, is not yet investigated for a large European wholesale and hypermarket portfolio.

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 16 August 2019

Sima Rani Dey and Mohammed Tareque

The purpose of this paper is to assess the empirical cointegration, long-run and short-run dynamics as well as causal relationship between electricity consumption and real…

1933

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess the empirical cointegration, long-run and short-run dynamics as well as causal relationship between electricity consumption and real GDP in Bangladesh for the period of 1971‒2014.

Design/methodology/approach

Autoregressive Distributed lag (ARDL) “Bound Test” approach is employed for the investigation in this study.

Findings

Both short-run and long-run coefficients are providing strong evidence of having positive significant association between electricity consumption and GDP. Our long-run results remain robust to different measurements and estimators as well. The study reveals the unidirectional causal flow running from per capita electricity consumption to per capita real GDP in the short run. The study result also yields strong evidence of bidirectional causal relationship between per capita electricity consumption and per capita real GDP in the long run with feedback. It is suggested that both electricity generation and conservation policy will be effective for Bangladesh economy.

Originality/value

In prior studies, lack of causality between electricity consumption and GDP is due to the omitted variables. Combined effects of public spending and trade openness on GDP and electricity consumption are also considerable.

Details

Journal of Asian Business and Economic Studies, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2515-964X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 August 2022

Olufemi Gbenga Onatunji

The current wave of decreasing electricity supply to meet the immediate demand of the populace is influencing not only economic growth but also the industrial productivity…

Abstract

Purpose

The current wave of decreasing electricity supply to meet the immediate demand of the populace is influencing not only economic growth but also the industrial productivity of the ECOWAS sub-region. In this context, this paper investigates the long-run and causal relationships between electricity consumption and industrial output in selected ECOWAS countries over the period 1971–2017.

Design/methodology/approach

The Autoregressive Distributed Lag (ARDL) bound testing approach is employed to determine the existence of relationships among the variables. The causal nexus between electricity consumption and industrial output is examined using both the Toda-Yamamoto causality test and the bootstrap-corrected causality technique.

Findings

The long run results indicated that increasing electricity supply enhances industrial output only in Benin, Cote d'Ivoire, Gambia, Guinea, Liberia, Nigeria, Senegal, and Sierra Leone. Furthermore, the causality test results confirmed the presence of all four hypotheses in this study, but the two causality tests agree, particularly in the evidence of growth and neutrality hypotheses. In the cases of Benin, Burkina Faso, Gambia, Ghana, Nigeria, and Sierra Leone, a unilateral causality running from electricity consumption to industrial output is found. However, no evidence of causality between electricity consumption and industrial production has been confirmed in Cote d'Ivoire, Guinea Bissau, Liberia and Niger.

Practical implications

The relevant energy stakeholders in the subregion need to reprioritize their policy framework to focus more on the electricity sector of their economies since electricity consumption is identified as an important driver of industrial growth in the West African countries.

Originality/value

This is the first study to provide a comparative and country-specific investigation of the nexus between electricity consumption and industrial output in Africa, particularly in the West African region.

Details

Journal of Economic and Administrative Sciences, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1026-4116

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 December 2021

Paul Nayaga, Frank Adusah-Poku, John Bosco Dramani and Paul Owusu Takyi

The quest for economic development has brought adverse effects on the environment through the release of greenhouse gases, such as carbon dioxide (CO2). This will counter…

Abstract

Purpose

The quest for economic development has brought adverse effects on the environment through the release of greenhouse gases, such as carbon dioxide (CO2). This will counter the efforts to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) by 2030. This study, therefore, investigates the effect of electricity consumption and urbanization on CO2 emissions in Ghana. Electricity consumption and urbanization are among the factors that can be used to reduce CO2 emissions.

Design/methodology/approach

Following the STIRPAT framework with the Hansen (2000) least squares threshold estimation strategy, the study employed annual time series data from 1971 to 2019.

Findings

The study revealed a single threshold effect of both electricity consumption and urbanization on CO2 emissions. Electricity consumption intensity reduces CO2 emission when electricity consumption is below the threshold (6287GWh) but increases when consumption passes the threshold. However, urbanization exerts a positive influence on CO2 emissions regardless the level of urbanization (either before or after the threshold point). Again, the empirical results revealed that the urbanization threshold moderates the effect of electricity consumption on CO2 emissions.

Research limitations/implications

Policymakers have to consider redesigning the current urbanization mode to include some new-type urbanization elements.

Originality/value

The threshold effect of electricity consumption and urbanization on CO2 emissions in Ghana is examined using the Hansen (2000) least square method.

Details

Management of Environmental Quality: An International Journal, vol. 33 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7835

Keywords

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