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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2000

Dominic Medway, Gary Warnaby, David Bennison and Andrew Alexander

Building on an earlier publication in the International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, the following article investigates the reasons for retailers

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2105

Abstract

Building on an earlier publication in the International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, the following article investigates the reasons for retailers’ involvement in town centre management (TCM) schemes in the UK. Findings are drawn from interviews with representatives of independent traders and national multiples, and a questionnaire survey of town centre managers. The article reveals several key reasons for retailers’ involvement in TCM and identifies some significant differences between independents and multiples in this respect. The findings show that the overriding motivation for the participation of retailers in TCM is their belief that it may benefit their business in some way. Equally importantly, the research identifies a number of reasons why retailers do not become involved in TCM schemes. The article concludes by showing that an understanding of the reasons for retailers’ involvement in TCM can play a significant role in attracting retail support for the concept.

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International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 28 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 9 February 2010

Patrali Chatterjee

The purpose of this paper is to examine the role of consumer shopping orientations on consumer's channel choice, cross‐channel shopping behavior, and shopping outcomes.

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9482

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the role of consumer shopping orientations on consumer's channel choice, cross‐channel shopping behavior, and shopping outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

Using multiple sources of data including surveys of store, web, and cross‐channel shoppers and their transaction information, the impact of consumer shopping orientations on comparison‐shopping, likelihood of cross‐channel usage, purchase outcomes including unplanned purchasing, retailer satisfaction, intent to return/abandon purchases, and share of category purchases are investigated.

Findings

Results suggest that high‐thrift customers patronizing a cross‐channel retailer are less likely to search for competitive offerings online or offline than customers patronizing a multiple channel retailer. Further, retailer satisfaction is higher for cross‐channel compared to multi‐channel retailers irrespective of the transaction channel used by consumers.

Research limitations/implications

The data have external validity; however, they lack the control possible in laboratory experiments. Future research should examine if the findings can be replicated in multiple retail sectors.

Practical implications

These results suggest that brick‐and‐click retailers can exploit synergies between their channels through order online and pick up in store strategies for greater profitability than those who operate multiple independent channels.

Originality/value

This paper examines managerial implications of multiple independent channel vs cross‐channel strategies by retailers using data from customers of a commercial retailer.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1986

Peter A. Whitehead

Presents two distinct categories of braned merchandise in consumer purchasing goods, for today's market: proprietary or manufacturer‐owned; or the retailer‐owned or ‘own…

Abstract

Presents two distinct categories of braned merchandise in consumer purchasing goods, for today's market: proprietary or manufacturer‐owned; or the retailer‐owned or ‘own label’. Shows that own labels provide low levels of profit owing to competing manufacturers' willingness to supply the products. Whereas manufacturers marketing their own proprietary brands to consumers can directly influence the consumer's purchasing bent, and therefore promote long‐term franchise for their products. Goes on to discuss the methodology and the three separate processes involved: desk research; literature; and field research. Concludes that retailers and manufacturers need to heighten their highly interdependent social process but that the opportunity, challenge and solution are there to be grasped.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 20 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 4 July 2016

Alexander Hübner, Johannes Wollenburg and Andreas Holzapfel

Online retailing changes all retail systems significantly. The growing importance of online sales requires the creation of new fulfillment models. The purpose of this…

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13634

Abstract

Purpose

Online retailing changes all retail systems significantly. The growing importance of online sales requires the creation of new fulfillment models. The purpose of this paper is to investigate how retailers develop from separate multi-channel (MC) to integrated omni-channel (OC) fulfillment. OC retailing has an integrated perspective, with seamless interactions between online and bricks-and-mortar channels.

Design/methodology/approach

More than 60 internationally active retailers and experts from Germany participated in an exploratory survey. With a response rate of 40 percent the authors achieved the goal to adequately depict the German MC and OC retail market. It is currently the largest empirical study of MC and OC fulfillment.

Findings

It is the first study to comprehensively analyze the logistical development options open to retailers for integrated fulfillment. The authors discuss the conceptual development options and formulate propositions for an advanced OC fulfillment approach. OC retailers aim to pool their organizational units for fulfillment via different channels. Retailers with multiple channels develop their warehouse systems toward channel-integrated inventory enabling flexible and demand-driven inventory allocation. Retailers with channel-integrated inventory also organize their picking procedures in one common zone. The higher the outlet density, the more it becomes beneficial for retailers to introduce pick-up services.

Research limitations/implications

The research is based on insights from retailers and experts from companies based in Germany.

Practical implications

The findings provide an insight into designing OC fulfillment and distribution structures. The concepts themselves, archetypes, challenges and development paths are analyzed. Identified logistics levers can be adjusted to pinpoint the steps required to advance integration.

Originality/value

The authors contribute by deriving propositions and a framework for transitioning from basic MC to integrated, extended OC logistics. Because this research area is still comparatively young, the authors take a more comprehensive, exploratory view of OC fulfillment.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 46 no. 6/7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1999

Dominic Medway, Andrew Alexander, David Bennison and Gary Warnaby

Investigates the role that retailers play in the cash funding of town centre management (TCM) schemes in the UK. The findings are drawn from a detailed questionnaire…

Abstract

Investigates the role that retailers play in the cash funding of town centre management (TCM) schemes in the UK. The findings are drawn from a detailed questionnaire survey of town centre managers, and a series of interviews with retail business representatives. Reveals that although most TCM schemes attract some funding from retailers, the number who contribute is very low. Moreover, substantial financial involvement in TCM at a corporate level is restricted to seven major retail companies. It is also shown that retailers’ financial support for TCM can be classified into two basic types: “ring‐fenced” and “freestanding”. In conclusion, the implications of the relatively low level of retail funding for TCM are assessed, and some potentially useful areas of research are identified.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 27 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1999

Malcolm Kirkup

Advances in electronics have added sophisticated footfall monitoring to retailers’ information weaponry. Many retailers are reported to be experimenting with this new…

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1041

Abstract

Advances in electronics have added sophisticated footfall monitoring to retailers’ information weaponry. Many retailers are reported to be experimenting with this new technology, but limited discussion exists in the public domain on its potential role or retailer experiences. This paper utilises interviews with UK clothing multiples to help conceptualise the potential applications and examine the benefits and challenges of electronic footfall monitoring. The paper finds that, in spite of widespread experiments, only a small proportion of retailers have so far pursued full‐scale integration with existing information systems to exploit the claimed opportunities for improved market‐monitoring, diagnostic analysis, impact measurement and resource allocation. Concerns relate to the nature of the information generated, technical challenges, internal acceptability and broader organisational and management issues.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 11 September 2007

Andrew Cox, Daniel Chicksand and Martin Palmer

This paper aims to assess the findings of a research project that investigates the scope for lean strategies to be adopted in beef, lamb and pig supply chains.

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2588

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to assess the findings of a research project that investigates the scope for lean strategies to be adopted in beef, lamb and pig supply chains.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reports on action research carried out in three red meat supply chains. The methodology is inductive and qualitative, using a multi‐case, multi‐site approach. Each of the supply chains was analysed from farm gate to consumer, interviewing multiple participants at each stage of the supply chain.

Findings

The analysis demonstrates that, although a lean approach has been introduced in the pig supply chain, it is much more problematic in beef and lamb supply chains. Furthermore, the majority of participants in the UK pig supply chain – the first to adopt lean strategies – have not received the commercial improvement (the stairway to heaven” of higher returns) that was anticipated. On the contrary, the majority of participants in this supply chain are experiencing a strategic “treadmill to oblivion” of continuous lean operational efficiency, but with low commercial returns.

Research limitations/implications

The research is based upon three red meat supply chains – beef, lamb and pig. It would be beneficial if further in‐depth studies could be undertaken in other agri‐food supply chains to further validate the findings.

Practical implications

If government agencies and/or multiple retailers develop lean strategies in UK beef and lamb supply chains, it is not at all clear that this will benefit all parties in these chains. This raises important questions about the efficacy and appropriateness of lean strategies in supply chains that do not have the same demand, supply and power and leverage characteristics as those in which lean principles were first developed.

Originality/value

This paper should be of value to researchers in this area and to managers responsible for strategy formation in UK agri‐food supply chains.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 109 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1979

Christina Fulop and Tim March

Compares and contrasts the effects of the resale price maintenance abolition of 1964 emerging in different products and markets, with particular emphasis on the furniture…

Abstract

Compares and contrasts the effects of the resale price maintenance abolition of 1964 emerging in different products and markets, with particular emphasis on the furniture and footwear trades. Finds that the furniture trade has been more significantly affected, with a higher consciousness of consumer needs among its retailers.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 13 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 28 January 2020

Dilupa Nakandala, Meg Smith and Henry Lau

The purpose of this paper is to investigate supply chain relationships in an urban local fresh food system from a retailer perspective to examine the types of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate supply chain relationships in an urban local fresh food system from a retailer perspective to examine the types of relationships and the factors underpinning the development of such relationships.

Design/methodology/approach

Using the multiple case study method, interview data from twelve urban local fresh food retailers in Sydney were analysed using the thematic analysis.

Findings

This study finds that balanced power relationships in the supply chain allow reasonable power to sit with growers in product price determination irrespective of the dependency of small-scale growers on relatively large local retailers. Trust-based relationships are developed over multiple transactions, where shared values across the supply chain and consistently low opportunistic behaviour in reward sharing are demonstrated to be the crucial factors underpinning close relationships. This study also found evidence of horizontal supply chain linkages among retailers in a competitive environment.

Practical implications

Findings of this study have implications for policymakers in designing urban fresh food systems and for practitioners in large urban retailers including supermarkets that attempt to integrate local food into their product portfolio.

Originality/value

This study extends the local food system literature dominated by rural studies to include new knowledge about the dynamics of collaborations in contemporary urban local fresh food supply chains. It provides the first empirical evidence of lateral inventory transshipment between retailers in a competitive environment confirming previous simulation studies.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 122 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 30 July 2018

Abstract

Details

Marketing Management in Turkey
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-558-0

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